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  1. Thanks
    US-UK reacted to SusieQQQ in Mom came on B2..Now she wants to stay   
    Bookmarking for next time a Nigerian complains their parents can’t get B visas to visit the US.
  2. Like
    US-UK reacted to Boiler in Immigration/marriage fraud   
    There are strong women in every country.
  3. Like
    US-UK reacted to J+J in Location of the lawyer for a K1 visa   
    I don't think anybody is saying that having a lawyer means the immigration process itself is easier or faster.  I'm certainly not saying that.
     
    However you could argue that for the document gathering process and compiling the application, a knowledgeable attorney could help a not-so-knowledgeable applicant get that together faster and with a lower chance of errors (if the attorney is competent!).  Yes, of course you could DIY with help from this forum, as most do, but IMO a competent attorney would get you there faster, if you are just starting and know nothing.   
     
    By the way I advocate the DIY approach, but this person is asking about attorneys so I figured I'd answer the question rather than just say "you don't need that".
  4. Like
    US-UK reacted to J+J in Location of the lawyer for a K1 visa   
    This forum is very quick to say you don't need a lawyer, while knowing nothing of your case.  If you want one then I will try to answer your question.
     
    You have a tough situation where it sounds like you wouldn't be able to meet your lawyer face to face, if the lawyer is in the US.  The phone always can work if you are comfortable enough with that option.  
     
    To find a lawyer you should go to avvo.com and find a highly rated lawyer who specializes in immigration only.  I don't know that it matters what state.  Make sure they are "tech savvy" and are able to use email and file sharing apps like Dropbox because you will be exchanging a lot of documents.  You may have to pay for a phone consult, that's normal, but attorneys may roll that into their cost if you hire them.  Expect to pay $2000-$3000 to get you all the way through AOS.  Ask lots of questions before hiring.
     
    Good luck.
     
     
     
     
  5. Like
    US-UK reacted to SusieQQQ in Time allowed for tourist visa   
    Back to basics.
    One of the most important factors in getting a B visa/using it to enter is to show ties to home country.
    hard to argue you have those ties when you are in the US for 6 months, out a short time, try to come back for 6 months.
    as above, she may meet a lenient cbp Officer. But she may not.
  6. Like
  7. Like
    US-UK reacted to geowrian in A Question about the AP approval timelines and traveling after AP approval but before receipt of card in the mail   
    Bingo. You always get data about the people who fall ahead of the average sooner than those who fall at or behind the average.
    Say there are 100 people in a sample who filed on the exact same day. If 20 of them report getting approved at an average of 100 days, does that make the sample's average 100 days? Clearly no. The average might be 160 days and those 20 were just within 1 or 2 standard deviations. There would be no way to know - or even make a reasonable estimate - the average after only 20 people reported their results.
  8. Thanks
    US-UK reacted to SusieQQQ in LPR CHILD UNDER 21 (15 years old)..F2A..Priority date 7/2018   
    Also don’t claim you didn’t know any of this. You knew well in advance, as is clear from the first post in this thread 
     
     
  9. Like
    US-UK reacted to geowrian in LPR CHILD UNDER 21 (15 years old)..F2A..Priority date 7/2018   
    So it wasn't really a hole but a combination of not doing research + deciding to immigrate even though their child couldn't as well.
  10. Like
    US-UK reacted to SusieQQQ in LPR CHILD UNDER 21 (15 years old)..F2A..Priority date 7/2018   
    Many immigrants face the same “hole”. Your in-laws had legal options. There were legal choices. Please don’t try justify breaking the law.  You are incredibly lucky that she is a minor or she would have a ten year ban from the US, and it would all be the fault of your in-laws making bad choices. 
  11. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from Jorgedig in Tourist Overstay Thoughts   
    That is work. Even if unpaid. Her sister could, and should, have hired a (legal) caregiver if she needed help.
  12. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from KittyKat3072 in K1, but confused if this is the right one   
    Aside from the timing to get the visa, please consider how difficult it is for any woman to find an OB to take her as a new patient so late in the pregnancy which, in your case, would probably be even harder given increased liability risk for the OB (for a variety of reasons) as a result of her ex-US prenatal care. Also think about the cost of a delivery in the US and be sure her insurance (and insurance for the baby) is well in place before she sets foot in the US.
  13. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from little immigrant in Tourist Overstay Thoughts   
    That is work. Even if unpaid. Her sister could, and should, have hired a (legal) caregiver if she needed help.
  14. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from SusieQQQ in Attorney Quote on us getting married on (her) Visitor's Visa   
    Moving across the country is a little different. Most people leaving their homes permanently —- or at least for the duration of AOS— would need to quit a job, break a lease, sell their car, close bank and other accounts, pack or sell all of their belongings, say goodbye to friends and family... 
     
    I personally can’t imagine the cost and aggravation just to replace my clothes, shoes, makeup, etc. if I packed to go somewhere for 90 days and ended up staying 6+ months.
  15. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from debbiedoo in K1, but confused if this is the right one   
    Aside from the timing to get the visa, please consider how difficult it is for any woman to find an OB to take her as a new patient so late in the pregnancy which, in your case, would probably be even harder given increased liability risk for the OB (for a variety of reasons) as a result of her ex-US prenatal care. Also think about the cost of a delivery in the US and be sure her insurance (and insurance for the baby) is well in place before she sets foot in the US.
  16. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from Bill & Katya in Tourist Overstay Thoughts   
    That is work. Even if unpaid. Her sister could, and should, have hired a (legal) caregiver if she needed help.
  17. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from Jpoy in K1, but confused if this is the right one   
    Aside from the timing to get the visa, please consider how difficult it is for any woman to find an OB to take her as a new patient so late in the pregnancy which, in your case, would probably be even harder given increased liability risk for the OB (for a variety of reasons) as a result of her ex-US prenatal care. Also think about the cost of a delivery in the US and be sure her insurance (and insurance for the baby) is well in place before she sets foot in the US.
  18. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from Boiler in Tourist Overstay Thoughts   
    That is work. Even if unpaid. Her sister could, and should, have hired a (legal) caregiver if she needed help.
  19. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from NikLR in Attorney Quote on us getting married on (her) Visitor's Visa   
    Moving across the country is a little different. Most people leaving their homes permanently —- or at least for the duration of AOS— would need to quit a job, break a lease, sell their car, close bank and other accounts, pack or sell all of their belongings, say goodbye to friends and family... 
     
    I personally can’t imagine the cost and aggravation just to replace my clothes, shoes, makeup, etc. if I packed to go somewhere for 90 days and ended up staying 6+ months.
  20. Like
    US-UK reacted to dentsflogged in Skype marriage (pakistan) spouse visa (merged)   
    You mean... he needs to get legally married in a way that is recognised and accepted as legal by the US government and more specifically by USCIS? 
     
    Marriage laws in Pakistan have no bearing in this discussion unless the marriage happened in Pakistan. It didn't - it happened, essentially, "online" which is what is causing this mess.   "Registering" it will not solve this issue - OP's friend going to Pakistan (or whatever 3rd country, since apparently OP & friend are convinced that OP isn't "allowed" to go there during his Green Card years) and getting properly legally married while physically in the same place as his wife - WILL solve the issue.
  21. Like
    US-UK reacted to Bill & Katya in Attorney Quote on us getting married on (her) Visitor's Visa   
    What the lawyer did not tell you is that you would still be responsible for gathering all the documents, and then their paralegal would fill out the forms for you.  Hiring a lawyer is a personal choice, but with a simple case, it is usually better to save the money and do it yourself.
     
    Good Luck!
  22. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from Bill & Katya in Attorney Quote on us getting married on (her) Visitor's Visa   
    Moving across the country is a little different. Most people leaving their homes permanently —- or at least for the duration of AOS— would need to quit a job, break a lease, sell their car, close bank and other accounts, pack or sell all of their belongings, say goodbye to friends and family... 
     
    I personally can’t imagine the cost and aggravation just to replace my clothes, shoes, makeup, etc. if I packed to go somewhere for 90 days and ended up staying 6+ months.
  23. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from Bill & Katya in Attorney Quote on us getting married on (her) Visitor's Visa   
    There wouldn’t be much, if any, love if it required not working, not traveling, potentially not driving, and not having my clothes and shoes... so it’s a good thing the OP is not marrying me (and also the reason we went for an EB1 rather than an Elvis wedding in Vegas). 
  24. Like
    US-UK got a reaction from Jorgedig in Attorney Quote on us getting married on (her) Visitor's Visa   
    There wouldn’t be much, if any, love if it required not working, not traveling, potentially not driving, and not having my clothes and shoes... so it’s a good thing the OP is not marrying me (and also the reason we went for an EB1 rather than an Elvis wedding in Vegas). 
  25. Haha
    US-UK reacted to Nitas_man in RFE - Not above 125% income   
    Describe the exact process of having a social security income letter Apostilled please
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