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coagulationfactor

B2 for Girlfriend & her Parents to Visit Non-Resident USC Boyfriend in USA

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Hello! I'm new here and seeking some advice. 

 

Background:

I'm a non-resident US citizen (27years old), living in Costa Rica. If it matters, I was born with Costa Rican, German and US citizenships, currently enrolled at a university. I have family all over the place, but my paternal family lives in the USA. My girlfriend (28years old) of 6 years is Thai and lives in Thailand. She and her parents are applying for B2 visas to visit me and my family for 2 weeks. Obviously, I'll be visiting temporarily and then returning to Costa Rica during that time. 

 

-My girlfriend is a college graduate, employed since 2014, stable job and salary. 

-Her father works for the Thai Government, stable job and salary. 

-Her mother is a home maker and has been since girlfriend was born. Before that she was employed.

 

I would classify them as middle-middle class. They own the land and house that they live in (I believe it's all under the mother's and/or the father's name). They own 2 cars and  2 motorcycles, although I am unsure if the officer cares about that. Financially, they have more than enough to fund an entire 2 week visit to the USA (plane tickets, travel/medical insurance, car rentals, etc). They are healthy. No criminal history. They have documents to support and prove all these details. They plan on purchasing tickets after they know whether they are approved. Nothing about their situation would indicate (at least to me) that they are trying to immigrate to the USA.   

 

1. They will be staying with me in my grandparents home. My grandparents wrote an invitation letter (hand signed and with copies of IDs to verify the address of the home) explaining "who, what, where, when and why". Would this be helpful?

 

2.Should I write some form of letter addressing the officer?  I feel that explaining that I am a USC but permanently living abroad and providing evidence of this (certification of my status as an active student, my own return ticket to Costa RIca, copy of passport with entry stamps, proof of my address abroad etc) would reduce the concern of whether my gf & her family would be a risk due to me. On the other hand, I am unsure this may be seen as going overboard and hurt her chances. I know they will ask my gf, and she will not lie about it, but it seems her explanation regarding me without evidence might not be enough. Any advice on this? Does it even matter that I don't live in the USA and have not for 10 years?

 

 

Any personal experiences or advice would be helpful and much appreciated.  

Thanks!

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Wales
Timeline

1. No

 

2. No

 

This is their application not yours.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Nigeria
Timeline

I know a person that worth over 2billion in Nigeria currency and he was still denied a visa despite all the companies and factories he owns...the embassy could care less about how much they are worth,the consular just wanna make sure they will return after their short visit in the States... Sometimes, they won't even look at the documents, they just wanna see how you answer and respond to their questions. 

Edited by Austin
Typo

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See, now this really confuses me..

 

if people are legitimately thinking of having a “Vacation” somewhere, the last thing that’s ever on their mind is all of the above mentioned by the OP.. 

 

I’ve visited over 15 countries including the USA.. I have multi-citizenship and a USC husband and not once have I thought about anything mentioned here.. 

 

genrally speaking, tourists simply apply for tourist visas via the appropriate channels, vary rarely do they think to join various forums etc to obtain information about things that would never normally come to mind. Letters of invite? Letters from non resident usc boyfriend, Cars, houses, property, and all this research etc etc just sets off my alarm bells, as I’m sure it does with immigration officials also..

 

your providing a letter saying your overseas has no reference.. as a usc you can drop right out of uni stay in the USA, marry this woman and file AOS at the drop of a hat.. 

 

this is their visa, let them apply like a normal person answering the questions asked, like a regular visitor.. 

Edited by Duke & Marie

AOS Journey

  • I-485 etc filed 23 April 2020 
  • NOA1 I-485 June 3 2020 
  • NOA1 EAD 23 April 2020
  • Biometrics 5 Jan 2021
  • EAD approved 12 March 2021
  • Interview Completed 24 March 2021
  • EAD Card Received 1 April 2021  
  • Case under review 2 April 2021
  • New Card is Being Produced 25 September 2021
  • 10 Year Green Card Approved and Mailed 27 September 2021 🙌🙌🙌🙌🙌

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I think this sums it up pretty well, as usual:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/us-visas/tourism-visit/visitor.html

Quote

Note: Visa applicants must qualify on the basis of the applicant's residence and ties abroad, rather than assurances from U.S. family and friends. A letter of invitation or Affidavit of Support is not needed to apply for a visitor visa. If you choose to bring a letter of invitation or Affidavit of Support to your interview, please remember it is not one of the factors used in determining whether to issue or deny the visa.

 

Edited by geowrian

Timelines:

ROC:

Spoiler

7/27/20: Sent forms to Dallas lockbox, 7/30/20: Received by USCIS, 8/10 NOA1 electronic notification received, 8/1/ NOA1 hard copy received

AOS:

Spoiler

AOS (I-485 + I-131 + I-765):

9/25/17: sent forms to Chicago, 9/27/17: received by USCIS, 10/4/17: NOA1 electronic notification received, 10/10/17: NOA1 hard copy received. Social Security card being issued in married name (3rd attempt!)

10/14/17: Biometrics appointment notice received, 10/25/17: Biometrics

1/2/18: EAD + AP approved (no website update), 1/5/18: EAD + AP mailed, 1/8/18: EAD + AP approval notice hardcopies received, 1/10/18: EAD + AP received

9/5/18: Interview scheduled notice, 10/17/18: Interview

10/24/18: Green card produced notice, 10/25/18: Formal approval, 10/31/18: Green card received

K-1:

Spoiler

I-129F

12/1/16: sent, 12/14/16: NOA1 hard copy received, 3/10/17: RFE (IMB verification), 3/22/17: RFE response received

3/24/17: Approved! , 3/30/17: NOA2 hard copy received

 

NVC

4/6/2017: Received, 4/12/2017: Sent to Riyadh embassy, 4/16/2017: Case received at Riyadh embassy, 4/21/2017: Request case transfer to Manila, approved 4/24/2017

 

K-1

5/1/2017: Case received by Manila (1 week embassy transfer??? Lucky~)

7/13/2017: Interview: APPROVED!!!

7/19/2017: Visa in hand

8/15/2017: POE

 

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17 minutes ago, Duke & Marie said:

See, now this really confuses me..

 

if people are legitimately thinking of having a “Vacation” somewhere, the last thing that’s ever on their mind is all of the above mentioned by the OP.. 

 

I’ve visited over 15 countries including the USA.. I have multi-citizenship and a USC husband and not once have I thought about anything mentioned here.. 

 

genrally speaking, tourists simply apply for tourist visas via the appropriate channels, vary rarely do they think to join various forums etc to obtain information about things that would never normally come to mind. Letters of invite? Letters from non resident usc boyfriend, Cars, houses, property, and all this research etc etc just sets off my alarm bells, as I’m sure it does with immigration officials also..

 

your providing a letter saying your overseas has no reference.. as a usc you can drop right out of uni stay in the USA, marry this woman and file AOS at the drop of a hat.. 

 

this is their visa, let them apply like a normal person answering the questions asked, like a regular visitor.. 

I think my girlfriend has a bad impression of what the B2 application/interview process will be like, based on her friend's and coworker's negative experiences. Honestly I don't know what to expect either, so we may be working ourselves up over trying to show that I am not a reason for her to immigrate to the USA. She's been told by many that Thai women are generally given a no, that applying with family could be seen negatively, and other confusing sometimes contradicting information.  I see your point about that the letters of invite not being a factor and probably useless, however I don't see why other things like property/assets and employment information would "ring alarm bells" when sufficient ties need to be demonstrated with evidence (perhaps I'm misunderstanding what you meant exactly). Sorry if my post was confusing, but Really, this is a simple vacation lol. She (we) are just trying to make sure she's done her best to show there's no intent to immigrate.       

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Wales
Timeline
15 minutes ago, coagulationfactor said:

I think my girlfriend has a bad impression of what the B2 application/interview process will be like, based on her friend's and coworker's negative experiences. Honestly I don't know what to expect either, so we may be working ourselves up over trying to show that I am not a reason for her to immigrate to the USA. She's been told by many that Thai women are generally given a no, that applying with family could be seen negatively, and other confusing sometimes contradicting information.  I see your point about that the letters of invite not being a factor and probably useless, however I don't see why other things like property/assets and employment information would "ring alarm bells" when sufficient ties need to be demonstrated with evidence (perhaps I'm misunderstanding what you meant exactly). Sorry if my post was confusing, but Really, this is a simple vacation lol. She (we) are just trying to make sure she's done her best to show there's no intent to immigrate.       

The information required is entered on the application form.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Vietnam
Timeline

In reality interview will prob be 5-10min. It’s basically a confirmation one way or the other on how the CO will issue or not issue a visa.  They need to just apply and see what happens.


ROC Timeline

Service Center: Vermont

90 Day Window Opened....08/08/17

I-751 Packet Sent..............08/14/17

NO1 Dated.........................

NO1 Received....................

Check Cashed....................

Biometrics Received..........

Biometrics Appointment.....

Approved...........................

 

IR-1/CR-1 Visa

I-130 NOA1: 22 Dec 2014
I-130 NOA2: 25 Jan 2015
NVC Received: 06 Feb 2015
Pay AOS Bill: 07 Mar 2015
Pay IV Bill : 20 Mar 2015
Send IV/AOS Package: 23 Mar 2015
Submit DS-261: 26 Mar 2015
Case Completed at NVC: 24 Apr 2015
Interview Date: 22 Sep 2015
Visa Approved: 22 Sep 2015
Visa Received: 03 Oct 2015 

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Philippines
Timeline

When I had my interview (both for B2 and K1) in Thailand, I saw applicants who seemed to have a lot (assets/money) got denied and some who were simple office workers (like me) got approved. So like what the others have already said, it really depends on their ties and the sincerity of the intent. COs are trained to see that through all the documents and the way we look and answer questions during the interview. 

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Indonesia
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17 hours ago, Duke & Marie said:

See, now this really confuses me..

 

if people are legitimately thinking of having a “Vacation” somewhere, the last thing that’s ever on their mind is all of the above mentioned by the OP.. 

 

I’ve visited over 15 countries including the USA.. I have multi-citizenship and a USC husband and not once have I thought about anything mentioned here.. 

 

genrally speaking, tourists simply apply for tourist visas via the appropriate channels, vary rarely do they think to join various forums etc to obtain information about things that would never normally come to mind. Letters of invite? Letters from non resident usc boyfriend, Cars, houses, property, and all this research etc etc just sets off my alarm bells, as I’m sure it does with immigration officials also..

 

your providing a letter saying your overseas has no reference.. as a usc you can drop right out of uni stay in the USA, marry this woman and file AOS at the drop of a hat.. 

 

this is their visa, let them apply like a normal person answering the questions asked, like a regular visitor.. 

 

No offense, but you are an Australian citizen. I am guessing it isn't difficult to get a visa to go pretty much anywhere. That's not the case for everyone. 

 

And while it raises alarm bells for you, some of those documents help or are required for visa applications to other countries. For instance, it helps for Indonesians (and probably Thai) to provide a letter of invite when applying for a visa to visit Japan. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs even provides a form letter: 

https://www.mofa.go.jp/files/000137089.pdf

 

And a Letter of Guarantee:

https://www.mofa.go.jp/files/000262545.pdf

 

I think other East Asian countries like South Korea are similar. Also, with the Schengen  tourist visa, applicants have to provide bank statements for the last 3 months, pay stubs, etc. 

 

In other words, while none of that is needed for a B2 visa, it is those other visa experiences that I'm sure lead to people wondering if the same is true for the B2... 

 

 

 


Removing Conditions Timeline

Aug. 10, '17: Mailed in I-751

Aug. 21, '17: NOA1

October 23, '18: NOA2- approval

October 30, 18: 10-year GC received

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ghana
Timeline
20 hours ago, coagulationfactor said:

Hello! I'm new here and seeking some advice. 

 

Background:.   

 

1. They will be staying with me in my grandparents home. My grandparents wrote an invitation letter (hand signed and with copies of IDs to verify the address of the home) explaining "who, what, where, when and why". Would this be helpful?

 

2.Should I write some form of letter addressing the officer?  I feel that explaining that I am a USC but permanently living abroad and providing evidence of this (certification of my status as an active student, my own return ticket to Costa RIca, copy of passport with entry stamps, proof of my address abroad etc) would reduce the concern of whether my gf & her family would be a risk due to me. On the other hand, I am unsure this may be seen as going overboard and hurt her chances. I know they will ask my gf, and she will not lie about it, but it seems her explanation regarding me without evidence might not be enough. Any advice on this? Does it even matter that I don't live in the USA and have not for 10 years?

 

 

Any personal experiences or advice would be helpful and much appreciated.  

Thanks!

   

1. Yes although most people here would say otherwise and the US Consulate website and DOS website also says it’s not a factor in decision making. It sure doesn’t hurt.

 

2. Not necessary at all and of dubious maybe negative value

 

Being middle class from Thailand they have an approximately 80% chance of approval as extracted from the visa statistics crudely.

 

https://travel.state.gov/content/dam/visas/Statistics/Non-Immigrant-Statistics/RefusalRates/FY18.pdf

 

Some would say COs are trained to see that through all the documents and the way we look and answer questions during the interview. My response is CO’s get fooled all the time, that’s why the USA has several million undocumented people who came in with a visa and never left plus several million who are now citizens and permanent residents who initially came in with visitor visas and adjusted status.

 

They definitely should give it a shot, odds are decent. My opinion is based on successfully inviting sixteen people (of widely varying financial status, background and international travel experience) to the USA over the years.


ᴀ ᴄɪᴛɪᴢᴇɴ ᴏғ ᴛʜᴇ ᴡᴏʀʟᴅ 

 

مواطن من العالم

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My now wife is Thai, and has gotten visas for over 4 different countries( South Korea, Dubai, Russia, and somewhere in Europe, and she followed all the rules and left in time, no overstays) before she applied at the embassy in Thailand to come to the US on a visitors visa. It was the biggest waste of 160.00 ever. She walked in, didn't even get a chance to sit down in the chair in front of the IO, he just slipped the denial paper under the glass and said have a nice day. Now, her friend who is a complete waste, with no travel history, no stable residence, no job, no nothing goes for her interview the next week and gets the Visa with no problems. She flew to the US back in early 2018 and hasn't left ( Even I knew this would happen). it is the luck of the draw I honestly believe, I think the CO/IO whatever you want to call them just flip a coin to decide.


Here on a K1? Need married and a Certificate in hand within a few hours? I'm here to help. Come to Vegas and I'll marry you Vegas style!!   Visa Journey members are always FREE for my services. I know the costs involved in this whole game of immigration, and if I can save you some money I will!

 

 

 

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On 1/27/2020 at 12:50 PM, Ray.Bonaquist said:

1. Yes although most people here would say otherwise and the US Consulate website and DOS website also says it’s not a factor in decision making. It sure doesn’t hurt.

 

2. Not necessary at all and of dubious maybe negative value

 

Being middle class from Thailand they have an approximately 80% chance of approval as extracted from the visa statistics crudely.

 

https://travel.state.gov/content/dam/visas/Statistics/Non-Immigrant-Statistics/RefusalRates/FY18.pdf

 

Some would say COs are trained to see that through all the documents and the way we look and answer questions during the interview. My response is CO’s get fooled all the time, that’s why the USA has several million undocumented people who came in with a visa and never left plus several million who are now citizens and permanent residents who initially came in with visitor visas and adjusted status.

 

They definitely should give it a shot, odds are decent. My opinion is based on successfully inviting sixteen people (of widely varying financial status, background and international travel experience) to the USA over the years.

Thanks for your input.

 

How should she answer certain questions?

For example, "what is the purpose of your visit?"

Obviously to visit my family and I is the purpose. I'm guessing a large part of approval/denial is how you answer too.

 

What if she says (on behalf of herself and her parents since parents don't speak English) something to the effect of "My boyfriend will be on vacation from university visiting his family in the USA between x and x months for 2 weeks.We were able to request time off from our jobs so we accepted their invitation to visit and meet his paternal family for the first time." ?

 

I can also see that there might not be a single "right" way to answer...  

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Ghana
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1 hour ago, coagulationfactor said:

Thanks for your input.

 

How should she answer certain questions?

For example, "what is the purpose of your visit?"

Obviously to visit my family and I is the purpose. I'm guessing a large part of approval/denial is how you answer too.

 

What if she says (on behalf of herself and her parents since parents don't speak English) something to the effect of "My boyfriend will be on vacation from university visiting his family in the USA between x and x months for 2 weeks.We were able to request time off from our jobs so we accepted their invitation to visit and meet his paternal family for the first time." ?

 

I can also see that there might not be a single "right" way to answer...  

Consular officers typically have very little average time allotted to one applicant. They prefer answers short and sweet since they can ask follow up questions if necessary. Long rambling explanation type answers risks incurring their ire. I’m visiting my boyfriend and his grandparents for two weeks.


ᴀ ᴄɪᴛɪᴢᴇɴ ᴏғ ᴛʜᴇ ᴡᴏʀʟᴅ 

 

مواطن من العالم

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