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charlitfc

Moving to America with a Severe Illness/Disability

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Hi there,

 

I'm soon to be a military spouse and the plan is to move to California from the UK with my SO late next year. I believe I'll be covered by the military as his spouse, but my mother is my dependent. She has (non-contagious) blood diseases which cause her a lot of medical problems. She is legally disabled and unable to work here so gets government benefits. My question is would I be able to insure her with my own insurance plan or would no one be willing to cover her? And if that's the case is there another way to help pay for medical costs?

She keeps telling me how she'll never cope on her own if I leave without her..

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Is your mother a US Citizen?


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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5 minutes ago, USS_Voyager said:

But if you move to the US next year, how is she going with you?

I echo this question.   

 

But assuming there's a plan for that, you would find it difficult to find a health insurance company that will allow a parent that is dependent on your own insurance policy, especially with pre-existing conditions.

 

 

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Like the other members here are wondering, you will not be able to bring over your mother with you. In fact, it will be a long time for her to even be able to immigrate to the US. Parents can only be petitioned by US citizens, so you would have to become a US citizen first. You spouse can not apply for your mother as there are no mother-in-law visas.

 

To give you an idea of we it takes, after you come to the US and become a permanent resident. You can apply for citizenship in 3 years. Then after you become a citizen by naturalization, you can apply for your mother which takes another year. So in total, you are looking at plus or minus 5 years before your mother can even immigrate here through you.

 

But to answer your question, when it comes time for your mother to immigrate, you must show that your mother will not become a public burden. So you will have to provide insurance and medical costs for her. Yes it can be done, but it is going to be very expensive.

 

But until then, you should reevaluate your plan if you can't leave your mother behind.


“When starting an immigration journey, the best advice is to understand that sacrifices have to be made; whether it is time, money, or separation or a combination of any or all.” - NuestraUnion

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Posted (edited)

I appreciate all of the responses. I know it's a stupid question, but I'm scraping the bottom of the barrel so to speak. The immigration rules in England are a lot easier than other places. I have to go to California with him if we're to stay together. He'll be stationed there permanently with the guard. The initial intention was not to have her come with me, but she is causing me so much stress over leaving her that I'm now looking for any available way to bring her.

 

Also she used to live and work in the states, and had a green card. However I'm not sure for how long and I imagine it the card has definitely expired by now 

Edited by charlitfc

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On what basis will she be moving to the US.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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You may want to look specifically into California insurance laws. I know that there are coverage options in that state for those that are not traditional and not employer based. I think they have coverage options for those that are undocumented or here on non-residency visas. Your mother may be able to come for a longer visit on her visa, but couldn't move here. But maybe that would help her ease into the transition of being able to care for herself and she could have one of those unique CA insurance coverages during that time. It wouldn't be a permanent solution, but sometimes giving parents a short-term plan helps ease their anxiety as they transition into a new phase of life.

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12 minutes ago, charlitfc said:

 

Also she used to live and work in the states, and had a green card. However I'm not sure for how long and I imagine it the card has definitely expired by now 

When was the last time she lived and worked in the States? When did she move back to the UK? If it's more than 1 year ago, it is likely that she has abandoned her green card. You can only sponsor her if you're a US citizen.

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25 minutes ago, charlitfc said:

I appreciate all of the responses. I know it's a stupid question, but I'm scraping the bottom of the barrel so to speak. The immigration rules in England are a lot easier than other places. I have to go to California with him if we're to stay together. He'll be stationed there permanently with the guard. The initial intention was not to have her come with me, but she is causing me so much stress over leaving her that I'm now looking for any available way to bring her.

 

Also she used to live and work in the states, and had a green card. However I'm not sure for how long and I imagine it the card has definitely expired by now 

Sounds like my MIL.  She was very against my then fiancé coming over, but she is fine now.  Sure she issues the guilt trip on Katya occasionally, but she is fine.  As others have mentioned, the options are limited and time consuming here, so you will have to make a tough choice very soon.  Good luck!


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Looks like we are looking at 2025 ish an a lot can happen in that sort of time period, so not an issue for the moment. If she wants to visit then check the price and availability of travel insurance.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, charlitfc said:

I appreciate all of the responses. I know it's a stupid question, but I'm scraping the bottom of the barrel so to speak. The immigration rules in England are a lot easier than other places. I have to go to California with him if we're to stay together. He'll be stationed there permanently with the guard. The initial intention was not to have her come with me, but she is causing me so much stress over leaving her that I'm now looking for any available way to bring her.

 

Also she used to live and work in the states, and had a green card. However I'm not sure for how long and I imagine it the card has definitely expired by now 

No. You are doing the right thing. You are researching options. you have to start somewhere.

 

If she previously lived in the states, under what visa or status was she? Also, how long ago was this? This would help with any options you may have.

Edited by Unlockable

“When starting an immigration journey, the best advice is to understand that sacrifices have to be made; whether it is time, money, or separation or a combination of any or all.” - NuestraUnion

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Posted (edited)

In regards to military, there is a possiblity for your mother to become a dependent (secondary) of your spouse. Here's the link for information,  Secondary Dependency
https://www.dfas.mil/militarymembers/SecondaryDependency/SDC.html .

 

I'm not certain if that same principle of secondary dependency can be used for immigration. However, there is a dedicated department within uscis for military members and families. It never hurts to call. 

 

Good luck!

Edited by Coolbeginning

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