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Lauren E

Neither my fiancé nor do I meet income requirements for k-1

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My fiancé is Venezuelan living in Peru, I met him there and we’ve been together for over a year. I want to bring him to the US, but neither he nor I have a stable income. What other options do we have? I know that we could get a joint sponsor, but who could that be? Is there a way he could get refugee status considering the situation in Venezuela ? 

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You need either to increase the income of the US Citizen or get a joint sponsor.   That can be anyone who lives in the US


March 2, 2018  Married In Hong Kong

April 30, 2018  Mary moves from the Philippines to Mexico, Husband has MX Permanent Residency

June 13, 2018 Mary receives Mexican Residency Card

June 15, 2018  I-130 DCF Appointment in Juarez  -  June 18, 2018  Approval E-Mail

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1. Find a second job or a better job. Go back to the US and improve your life situation.

2. Find a joint sponsor. 

3. Your foreign fiance income doesnt matter. 

 

If you dont have a stable income then how are you going to support him when he comes to the US and cant work for months? How are you going to support him through AOS?

 

Dont count on the refugee status in order to skip the whole thing. It's not going to happen. 


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He lives in Peru why would he need to claim asylum because he is originally from Venezuela?

 

Sounds like just trying to circumvent the financial responsibility tbh


 

 

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14 hours ago, Lauren E said:

but neither he nor I have a stable income

You will need income to live, to support him, to get a US visa approved, for many reasons.  Others in your situation go out and find a job, two jobs, three jobs, whatever is necessary to be together.  I had an Uber driver the other day who makes a net income of $1,000 a week after expenses just driving for Uber.  Unemployment is at an all-time low in most areas so there are jobs out there if you want to overcome this, you can.

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I’m looking for a job now, it shouldn’t be a problem to get some sort of job, but how far back to they look? I heard for 2 years they need to see income stability, does that mean I need to keep a job from now on for 2 years before we can even apply? 

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9 hours ago, Randyandyuni said:

He lives in Peru why would he need to claim asylum because he is originally from Venezuela?

 

Sounds like just trying to circumvent the financial responsibility tbh

Yes, because I don’t have an income right now, so I would love to find a way to go around that requirement, I could support him for a while with my savings, I know he could get a job here quickly, he is young, strong and a hard worker.

4 hours ago, carmel34 said:

You will need income to live, to support him, to get a US visa approved, for many reasons.  Others in your situation go out and find a job, two jobs, three jobs, whatever is necessary to be together.  I had an Uber driver the other day who makes a net income of $1,000 a week after expenses just driving for Uber.  Unemployment is at an all-time low in most areas so there are jobs out there if you want to overcome this, you can.

Thanks you for your encouragement, I did just apply to be an Uber driver and delivery apps as well. 

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17 hours ago, Roel said:

1. Find a second job or a better job. Go back to the US and improve your life situation.

2. Find a joint sponsor. 

3. Your foreign fiance income doesnt matter. 

 

If you dont have a stable income then how are you going to support him when he comes to the US and cant work for months? How are you going to support him through AOS?

 

Dont count on the refugee status in order to skip the whole thing. It's not going to happen. 

What is AOS and also how many months does one usually need to wait before being able to work?

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6 minutes ago, Lauren E said:

 

Thanks you for your encouragement, I did just apply to be an Uber driver and delivery apps as well. 

It's faster to have evidence of extra income when you're an employee than when you're self-employed - something to keep in mind if you'd like him to join you sooner.  

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Lauren E said:

I know he could get a job here quickly, he is young, strong and a hard worker.

Then get married and apply for a spousal visa. He will then be able to work from the minute his passport is stamped on arrival. As it is, you’ve chosen (assuming you stick with the K-1) the most expensive visa that forbids him from working for many months. Why so many people still see this as the best option is beyond me. I understand for some there is no alternative but for many there is a much more logical alternative, especially when money is tight. 

Edited by JFH

 

 

 

 

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59 minutes ago, Lauren E said:

What is AOS and also how many months does one usually need to wait before being able to work?

AOS = Adjustment of Status

 

EAD/AP (work- and travel permit) currently take 5-7 months right now.

Green Card depends on your local office, and can take anywhere from 3 months to 1+ years.

 

Please educate yourself on this process. Knowledge is key. Without proper knowledge you can bump into RFE's, unpleasant surprises down the road and even denials. 

Read the guides on here (https://www.visajourney.com/k1-fiance-visa/) and the instructions on the USCIS website.

 

And as other said, without proper income there's no chance your fiancé will get a visa. You need to be able to proof at least 6 months of stable 125% poverty line income (K1 requires 100%, but for AOS you need 125% and some IO's at the embassy won't give out the visa if you make only 100%), so get a stable job and find a co-sponsor, just in case you need one.

 

Keep in mind, barely making the 125% is no guarantee that a visa will be granted or AOS will be accepted. Many, many stories on VJ where people barely made the 125% and were required to get a co-sponsor. 

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