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Suss&Camm

How old work experience is relevant?

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I'm updating my resumé which I've now gotten down to 2 pages! lol :D

As this VJ member: 

I'm also wondering about what to take out/leave in.

 

Layout:

On top I have ofc the contact details below this a two sentence description of my current career goals. This is followed by educational merits and then work merits each in chronological order with most recent first. Finally at the bottom I have listed "Additional Qualifications" that are specific to my field. Each work experience also has a brief description of main job duties. 

 

1. Does this layout seem alright?

2. How far back should I go time wise for it to still be relevant?

3. Which is more important, to not have any time gaps in employment (back home this is important and they'll ask you about it) OR for the job to be relevant to the field? I'm asking cause I have a totally unrelated job-experience.

4. Any tips on how to shorten it further? :ph34r:

 

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Generally speaking if you have employment gaps, if you manage to get an interview, you will be asked about. You don't have to list it down to the day, most people just put the Month/Year and that's enough. I think some people even just go by year alone and drop the month.

 

I don't know what field you're applying in, but I never used a "Career goals"/"Objective" on my resume. It just seemed to hog up too much precious space since we only use 1 page in the US. Also, a lot of the time it's kind of obvious what your goals/objectives are, and you can always just write it in the email cover letter in order to save space for more important info on your resume. Included References for sure. If you run out of space just make it like this:
 

Quote

 

References:

Available upon request.

 

About the "time gaps" versus "relevant jobs" question: that's a tough call. Are you sure it's totally unrelated? Sometimes even a random side job could have some soft skills or benefits, it's hard to say. I'm just thinking maybe it's better to list the job, even if irrelevant, because it's better than making it look like you were unemployed perhaps. Generally speaking, recent experience is more valued, but if you have some awesome experience from 10 years ago that is going to make you stand out from the rest, it's probably worth listing as well.

 

Also: IT NEEDS TO BE ONE PAGE. Sorry for yelling but that's just so expected in the States, lol. Nobody will ever look at the second page! Maybe if you're an academic or applying for some super prestigious job, the Euro style C.V. would be in order, but for just about everything else: short and simple is the way to go.

 

Things to consider deleting: objective/career goals, detailed job descriptions (make it a one liner, for example "Managing specialist & client coordinator" or something short and to the point), educational merits: honestly unless it's field-specific, just put your university degree only. What are "work merits"? I'm just curious because I've never seen that before....most people just break it up into "Education" & "Experience" categories.

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6 minutes ago, millefleur said:

Generally speaking if you have employment gaps, if you manage to get an interview, you will be asked about. You don't have to list it down to the day, most people just put the Month/Year and that's enough. I think some people even just go by year alone and drop the month. I have month year, so I'll leave it at that then :)

 

I don't know what field you're applying in, but I never used a "Career goals"/"Objective" on my resume. It just seemed to hog up too much precious space since we only use 1 page in the US. Also, a lot of the time it's kind of obvious what your goals/objectives are, and you can always just write it in the email cover letter in order to save space for more important info on your resume. Included References for sure. If you run out of space just make it like this: Pharmaceutical/Analytical Chemist, but this is a good point. I will convey it through email or the cover letter instead :yes:

 

About the "time gaps" versus "relevant jobs" question: that's a tough call. Are you sure it's totally unrelated? Sometimes even a random side job could have some soft skills or benefits, it's hard to say. I'm just thinking maybe it's better to list the job, even if irrelevant, because it's better than making it look like you were unemployed perhaps. I worked for a while as a traffic controller/dispatcher for a cab company. I guess maybe managerial skills and definitely multi-tasking (those Saturday nights were crazy hahahah) could be possible soft skills from that

 

Generally speaking, recent experience is more valued, but if you have some awesome experience from 10 years ago that is going to make you stand out from the rest, it's probably worth listing as well. Sooo.. last.. say six years unless really good one?

 

Also: IT NEEDS TO BE ONE PAGE. Sorry for yelling but that's just so expected in the States, lol. Nobody will ever look at the second page! Maybe if you're an academic or applying for some super prestigious job, the Euro style C.V. would be in order, but for just about everything else: short and simple is the way to go. I'll make sure I get it down to one, thnx for stressing that :lol: a question about that though... Part of my work experience is in academic research, but you mean if that's what the application is for right?

 

Things to consider deleting: objective/career goals, detailed job descriptions (make it a one liner, for example "Managing specialist & client coordinator" or something short and to the point), educational merits: honestly unless it's field-specific, just put your university degree only.

All good points, I'll take you up on all of those actually:innocent:

 

What are "work merits"? I'm just curious because I've never seen that before....most people just break it up into "Education" & "Experience" categories. Oh, by work merits I just meant work experience - language fail :P unless you meant the "Additional Qualifications" which in that case for me is experience working with/troubleshooting and interpreting results from specific analytical chemistry equipment and software.. these are pretty much universal :)

 

Forgot to mention the references, I have that exact sentence :dance:

 

Great stuff! Now I have something to do with my afternoon! thank you for your thought through answer. (F)

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8 minutes ago, Suss&Camm said:

 

Great stuff! Now I have something to do with my afternoon! thank you for your thought through answer. (F)

Sounds good! Last six years seems fine, I guess you'd only need to go back farther if the job specified 10+ years experience....or as I said if it's something you feel really proud of and want to talk about it at your interview.

 

Since you have academic research experience, I'm not sure where I'd put that. Hmm. Try googling for a resume of some other Pharmaceutical/Analytical Chemists and see how they formatted it? Real world examples are always great to steal from! :D

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9 minutes ago, millefleur said:

Sounds good! Last six years seems fine, I guess you'd only need to go back farther if the job specified 10+ years experience....or as I said if it's something you feel really proud of and want to talk about it at your interview.

 

Since you have academic research experience, I'm not sure where I'd put that. Hmm. Try googling for a resume of some other Pharmaceutical/Analytical Chemists and see how they formatted it? Real world examples are always great to steal from! :D

I'm on it! :D (maybe I'll call it be inspired by.. ;) )

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2 hours ago, TabeaK said:

The resume/CV length is experience and job specific. The "It has to be one page" mantra maybe true when applying for an entry level job, but certainly not universal.

 

If you are an academic and applying to research type positions in either academia or industry and this is not your first job 2 pages are very common, and so are three. My resume has three pages (I am biomedical pharmaceutical research scientist) and I have had no issues with it in the US. I deal with lots of applications in my job as well and have never seen a resume with less than two pages.

 

So don't bang yourself up too much concerning the length.

I see :) thank you for sharing that. 

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9 minutes ago, Suss&Camm said:

I see :) thank you for sharing that. 

I'm a little confused now about the resume length. I've been specifically told by a recruiter that, unless you have like 20+ years of relevant work experience, your resume should only be one page, showing the most recent relevant positions you had. 

My field is Marketing. 

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My resume is 4 pages long and I've had no trouble getting jobs I've applied for. 5 years ago, I got the only job (non-supervisory) I applied for (still my current job) when I only had 10 years of previous experience (now I have 15 years of experience, obviously, and my resume is now at 4.25 pages, and that's cutting out the irrelevant stuff). 

 

(Government & security-related work)

 

So, clearly, I think the format and length depend on one's field.

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Most recruiters prefer a one page resume. Something to show your experience and point out some achievements/tasks. If you're called for an interview, your experience will be discussed more in-depth then.

 

I'm in hotel management and have 12+ years of management experience. I've been responsible for recruitment at both jobs I've held since moving to the US.  Every single American resume I see at work is one page long. Whenever I see a resume that's longer than one page, it ALWAYS belongs to a foreigner. Not saying that a two page resume will not be considered but it will certainly be frowned upon. At my previous job, we always found it funny that our General Manager with 41 years' work experience was able to present a one page resume yet we sometimes get people (foreigners) applying for receptionist or waitress jobs with a two page resume. 

 

Not to mention that following the American layout for a resume shows that you've done your research and know how to present yourself over here.

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I think the resume length does depend on the position level and the field and how competitive the position/field is.

 

It seems like if you're a highly qualified specialist, there are few of you around so a longer resume is not going to deter HR. Also, it might show off your knowledge better.

 

If the competition is high, let's say the get 100+ applicants, I tend to feel that a longer resume can be a negative. They simply aren't going to look at longer resumes or will skip the extra pages if they have to look through numerous applications. Also, recruiters tend to go with the "keep it to one page" mantra, as you've seen in this thread.

 

The best bet is: google for examples of US formatted resumes in your specific field. I think that will probably be the best guide. Or talk to others who work in that specific field as well. For specialists/highly qualified people, it seems the "one page" rule doesn't always apply.

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My resume is 2 pages and I dont have issues with callbacks. 

I keep references separate though.  Often they're asked for indivudually if not on the job application.  I personally would call references before even calling about scheduling an interview, but in the USA you have an interview, maybe even a second interview before a background check or references are ever contacted.  It's a waste of everyones time imho. 

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Thanks for all your input.. I found a nice little guide for chemists that I'm looking at... basically it recommends 1 page for BSc and 2 pages for graduate students and additional if a lot of work experience... I feel like all your combined advice fits pretty well with this :)

 

I'll probably keep it at two but I'll optimize it..


http://careers.scs.illinois.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/EXAMPLE-resumes-Chemistry.pdf

Edited by Suss&Camm

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