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I want to join my husband (the beneficiary/applicant) for his interview to support him. He is very concern this will put more pressure on both of us to answer correctly if I get asked questions also. Does the consulate officer make it harder if both spouses are there? Are there differences in the type of questions they ask each party? What has been your experience so far?

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6 minutes ago, HanQ said:

I want to join my husband (the beneficiary/applicant) for his interview to support him. He is very concern this will put more pressure on both of us to answer correctly if I get asked questions also. Does the consulate officer make it harder if both spouses are there? Are there differences in the type of questions they ask each party? What has been your experience so far?

It depends on the embassy.  The embassy that my interview will be at actually prefers both parties go to show commitment and to answer any questions that may arise.  The interview should still be mainly focused on the beneficiary.  The petitioner, as far as I have seen, does not get many directed questions.  Any question they ask him/ her though, I assume you would also know the answer!  You can contact the embassy or check their page to see if spouses are allowed.  If they're allowed and you are able to go, I recommend going as I have seen positive outcomes when both parties are present.  Good luck!

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15 minutes ago, HanQ said:

I want to join my husband (the beneficiary/applicant) for his interview to support him. He is very concern this will put more pressure on both of us to answer correctly if I get asked questions also. Does the consulate officer make it harder if both spouses are there? Are there differences in the type of questions they ask each party? What has been your experience so far?

It really depends on the embassy on wither they allow both of you to be there for the interview. Some embassies like Pakistan do not allow it but the Philippines does allow it. I would say if you can go there then I would because it would be great for the both of you. I went to my wife's interview for her K1 visa and it was great. The CO talked to me more than he talked to my then fiance. 

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After reading the US Embassy review for Vietnam, it does look like they allow spouse to join for the interview. My husband is just the super careful meticulous type while I'm the carefree type so he doesn't want us to fail accidentally by answering a question wrong or to cause a suspicion unnecessarily. 

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55 minutes ago, HanQ said:

After reading the US Embassy review for Vietnam, it does look like they allow spouse to join for the interview. My husband is just the super careful meticulous type while I'm the carefree type so he doesn't want us to fail accidentally by answering a question wrong or to cause a suspicion unnecessarily. 

I think the advice generally is to attend the interview if the embassy allows for it.  I've never seen it work against a couple, only in their favor.  But do whatever you feel most comfortable with of course.  Best of luck!

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12 hours ago, HanQ said:

After reading the US Embassy review for Vietnam, it does look like they allow spouse to join for the interview. My husband is just the super careful meticulous type while I'm the carefree type so he doesn't want us to fail accidentally by answering a question wrong or to cause a suspicion unnecessarily. 

Yes, the Consulate in HCMC allows petitioner to join the beneficiary for the interview. I've been there a couple of times. My observation is most of the time, they only ask questions directed toward the beneficiary, and completely ignore the petitioner. You're just there to provide moral support mostly, but it's a show of good faith and shows you care enough to make the trip, so that counts for something. Very rarely that they would ask petitioners questions, and I am almost 100% sure that in those cases, they already have their suspicions before the interview ever took place and it just serves to confirm their suspicions.

 

The moral of the story though is, if you relationship is real, you have nothing to worry about. There is no trap. The COs just do their jobs, which is trying to determine the validity of your relationship. They're not their to make your life hell (although, be prepared for one hot morning because there is no AC where the interviewees sit, and the weather in HCMC is as you know, HOT). The system works, just have to follow the steps.

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I went to my fiance's interview at the Consulate in HCMC. They interview the beneficiary first. If they have questions for you, they will ask you to come to the window. I watched a lot of interviews and most only took 10 minutes. My wife's interview was probably 10-15 minutes and my portion was about 10 minutes (I had to explain some financial and divorce records). Both of you should attend. A few tips:

 

*Get to the Consulate about 30 minutes early and get in ASAP. DO NOT talk to people on the street - they are hustlers and scammers.

*Don't drag a bunch of stuff with you. Just take your papers and backpack. They don't like to look through a bunch of stuff and it slows things down. Make sure you have passports and invite letter. That's what the guards want to see.

*While waiting inside, sit and talk. Don't look nervous. Be calm.

*Understand that there is no order to the waiting list. You get a number and it will be displayed whenever - seems very random.

*Don't discuss your case with others. Don't give advice and don't solicit same.

*Don't be dismayed or upset by the people that get rejected. You will likely see some poor girl crying at the window and people looking upset because they were rejected. It happens often in a high-fraud country like Vietnam. You are American and you are there for support - that goes a long way with the Consulate officials.

*If language is a barrier, don't worry about it. They speak English and Vietnamese.

*Know what your plans are for life in the U.S. This seemed really important to my interview officials. "What will your wife do while she is waiting for Green Card and you are away working?" "Does she have a plan for education or job?"

 

Good luck! Have fun at the interview - it's a crazy experience.

 

Edited by WandY

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On 2/11/2019 at 9:04 PM, HanQ said:

I want to join my husband (the beneficiary/applicant) for his interview to support him. He is very concern this will put more pressure on both of us to answer correctly if I get asked questions also. Does the consulate officer make it harder if both spouses are there? Are there differences in the type of questions they ask each party? What has been your experience so far?

The COs in Vietnam pay attention to whether or not the petitioner shows up. It doesn't make or break the interview, but it is generally seen as a positive sign if the petitioner is there.

 

You're not likely to be asked anything. I was sworn in alongside my fiancee, and then the CO told me to go sit down. 😀

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I went with my wife and actually was able to listen to the questions the office was asking. He asked questions she clearly didn't understand and at that point I looked at him and raised my hand. He motioned me over and I politely told him she didn't understand and I ask permission to rephrase the question. He allowed it and she gave him the answer. He the. asked me questions. One was how often I visited her. I told hi.it was my 5th trip and I stayed 8 weeks on each trip. He looked surprised and I offered my passport as proof. He declined and at that point to her. "Welcome to the United States."

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