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hashtagme

Expedite naturalization b/c military spouse overseas - questions

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Hello

As we are moving forward with our situation we are currently at the stage of me having just received the Green card stamp after traveling to the US on an immigration visa.

My next step is to file for naturalization the expedite way.

The question isn’t if it’s possible, the embassy checked this plan and confirmed it for us already.

the questions we forgot to ask now are 

 

-I currently only have the stamp in the passport, the physical green card will be sent via mail and it can take a little while. Do I need the physical one for the N400 or is a copy of the stamp enough? 

-i will be filing from overseas since I’m in Europe with my husband on military orders. Where do I send the paperwork to? Can I just drop it off with the embassy where we got my visa  or do I send it to any USCIS office in the US?

Thank you in advance! 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, hashtagme said:

Hello

As we are moving forward with our situation we are currently at the stage of me having just received the Green card stamp after traveling to the US on an immigration visa.

My next step is to file for naturalization the expedite way.

The question isn’t if it’s possible, the embassy checked this plan and confirmed it for us already.

the questions we forgot to ask now are 

 

-I currently only have the stamp in the passport, the physical green card will be sent via mail and it can take a little while. Do I need the physical one for the N400 or is a copy of the stamp enough? 

-i will be filing from overseas since I’m in Europe with my husband on military orders. Where do I send the paperwork to? Can I just drop it off with the embassy where we got my visa  or do I send it to any USCIS office in the US?

Thank you in advance! 

The big question is are you on your spouse's orders? 

 

 

What you would be filing for expedited naturalization is under 319B. 

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I have a question regarding this: It reads that this is not an automatic process but rather a case by case decision for USCIS to expedite naturalisation. What is it dependent on? The kind of community your husband is in? Most military spouses wait for those three years and then apply for naturalisation and some wait for years to pursue that route.

 

I am aware that, of course, each individuals inclination plays a role but what are the deciding factors for USCIS?

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8 minutes ago, R&OC said:

I have a question regarding this: It reads that this is not an automatic process but rather a case by case decision for USCIS to expedite naturalisation. What is it dependent on? The kind of community your husband is in? Most military spouses wait for those three years and then apply for naturalisation and some wait for years to pursue that route.

 

I am aware that, of course, each individuals inclination plays a role but what are the deciding factors for USCIS?

I'd assume that most military spouses - who QUALIFY of course - will get the expedite approved.  It's different than someone expediting ex. spouse visa based on financial reasons or whatever - I'd imagine those cases are looked more as case-by-case decision. 

 

But in the end - it's impossible for anyone to say what USCIS base their decisions on. Definitely doesn't depend on the husband's community - it's all about spouse's eligibility.

 

Though I imagine most just wait until and apply under 3 year rule.


K1

29.11.2013 - NoA1

06.02.2014 - NoA2

01.04.2014 - Interview. 

AoS

03.2015 - AoS started.

09.2015 - Green Card received.  

RoC

24.07.2017 - NoA1.

01.08.2018 - RoC approved. 

 

 

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Roel, but if that is the case - why, for instance, did you not try to expedite your citizenship? It would potentially save you from paying ROC fees? I am just curious to understand the process. My friend, currently living in Spain, naturalized through their base (or legal on base?) - but I am really not sure how she did it. I will ask her, though.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, R&OC said:

Roel, but if that is the case - why, for instance, did you not try to expedite your citizenship? It would potentially save you from paying ROC fees? I am just curious to understand the process. My friend, currently living in Spain, naturalized through their base (or legal on base?) - but I am really not sure how she did it. I will ask her, though.

You can't skip ROC no matter what. Well unless you already have a 10 year card to begin with. There are steps you cant go around so someone who came on k1 or b2 has to do aos and roc and then do citizenship, expedited or not. Or you file roc and n400 at the same time. But there is no way around ROC fee. 

 

Even if you read the requirements it still says that the spouse needs to be  LPR for 3 years at least to qualify for naturalization.

 

At least that's my understanding. But it's also not the process that I actually went through. 

 

Also your friend might have legal help on post but the process still goes through the Uscis. Military doesnt give away citizenships or process naturalization applications.  

 

I didnt do it because I don't care for citizenship. 😛 Green card gives you the same benefits pretty much. 

Edited by Roel

K1

29.11.2013 - NoA1

06.02.2014 - NoA2

01.04.2014 - Interview. 

AoS

03.2015 - AoS started.

09.2015 - Green Card received.  

RoC

24.07.2017 - NoA1.

01.08.2018 - RoC approved. 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Roel said:

You can't skip ROC no matter what. Well unless you already have a 10 year card to begin with. There are steps you cant go around so someone who came on k1 or b2 has to do aos and roc and then do citizenship, expedited or not. Or you file roc and n400 at the same time. But there is no way around ROC fee. 

 

Even if you read the requirements it still says that the spouse needs to be  LPR for 3 years at least to qualify for naturalization.

 

 

Roel, that is the thing, though... I am not sure if the three year LPR status matter in certain cases. For instance, another friend of mine was offered to expedite her citizenship immediately when her husband got a position that needed a spouse to be US citizen, too. Now, I never inquired any further or asked her about it because it didn't interest me or simply wasn't relevant.

 

But I have a feeling that the ROC may not be a requirement to go through an expedited naturalisation process. I will try to ask her and then come back to you with it.

Just now, R&OC said:

Roel, that is the thing, though... I am not sure if the three year LPR status matter in certain cases. For instance, another friend of mine was offered to expedite her citizenship immediately when her husband got a position that needed a spouse to be US citizen, too. Now, I never inquired any further or asked her about it because it didn't interest me or simply wasn't relevant.

 

But I have a feeling that the ROC may not be a requirement to go through an expedited naturalisation process. I will try to ask her and then come back to you with it.

 And I know for a fact, that she didn't even have a green card at that time because she did not need one.

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Just now, R&OC said:

Roel, that is the thing, though... I am not sure if the three year LPR status matter in certain cases. For instance, another friend of mine was offered to expedite her citizenship immediately when her husband got a position that needed a spouse to be US citizen, too. Now, I never inquired any further or asked her about it because it didn't interest me or simply wasn't relevant.

 

But I have a feeling that the ROC may not be a requirement to go through an expedited naturalisation process. I will try to ask her and then come back to you with it.

Sure, it would be nice to know how this works. 

 


K1

29.11.2013 - NoA1

06.02.2014 - NoA2

01.04.2014 - Interview. 

AoS

03.2015 - AoS started.

09.2015 - Green Card received.  

RoC

24.07.2017 - NoA1.

01.08.2018 - RoC approved. 

 

 

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Roel,

 

there is a similar threat to this... and it seems to confirm what my friend was suggested to do. Apparently, with overseas orders, one can file for naturalisation prior to ROC and fulfilling the three year residency. This threat refers to another one in which one member did exactly that (if you like to scroll down). Interesting!

 

 

3 hours ago, Roel said:

Sure, it would be nice to know how this works. 

 

 

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Living overseas on orders counts towards time in residence in the US. So there are military family members that get their green card but then have to move overseas & they get to apply for naturalization while there, assuming they have met all requirements.


“The fact that we are here and that I speak these words is an attempt to break that silence and bridge some
of those differences between us, for it is not difference which immobilizes us, but silence.
And there are so many silences to be broken.”

Audre Lorde

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1 minute ago, R&OC said:

Hashtagme, do you have any updated you could share with us?

Hello

not really, we sent everything off to USCIS and are still waiting on their response. We’re hoping to hear something soon - I will keep you posted

 

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47 minutes ago, hashtagme said:

Hello

not really, we sent everything off to USCIS and are still waiting on their response. We’re hoping to hear something soon - I will keep you posted

 

Are there any additional documents or requirements to the usual process? My husband mentioned DD Form 1278? Did you get that signed and added to it? And when did you file the paperwork? 

 

Oh and one final question: Did you apply for the BBG (Beibehaltung der deutschen Staatsbürgerschaft)?

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