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Amy Suzuki

How do you keep GC?

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Hello all,

 

My husband is an American and we’ve been married since Dec29th 2016. I recently moved to the States and got my GC in April 27th 2019. I have my family back in Canada.

My husband is thinking to go to school in Canada for 4years and I want to go with him. How can I still keep my GC? 

I would be greatly thankful if you could help me...Thank you!

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3 minutes ago, Amy Suzuki said:

Hello all,

 

My husband is an American and we’ve been married since Dec29th 2016. I recently moved to the States and got my GC in April 27th 2019. I have my family back in Canada.

My husband is thinking to go to school in Canada for 4years and I want to go with him. How can I still keep my GC? 

I would be greatly thankful if you could help me...Thank you!

If you move to Canada you can't keep your GC. If you want to go with him you can give up your green card and reapply when you're ready to move back, or you can stay in the US and visit him in Canada.

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By staying in the US and residing in the US.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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9 minutes ago, Amy Suzuki said:

My husband is thinking to go to school in Canada for 4years and I want to go with him. How can I still keep my GC? 

You can't.


Applied for Naturalization based on 5-year Residency - 96 Days To Complete Citizenship!

July 14, 2017 (Day 00) -  Submitted N400 Application, filed online

July 21, 2017 (Day 07) -  NOA Receipt received in the mail

July 22, 2017 (Day 08) - Biometrics appointment scheduled online, letter mailed out

July 25, 2017 (Day 11) - Biometrics PDF posted online

July 28, 2017 (Day 14) - Biometrics letter received in the mail, appointment for 08/08/17

Aug 08, 2017 (Day 24) - Biometrics (fingerprinting) completed

Aug 14, 2017 (Day 30) - Online EGOV status shows "Interview Scheduled, will mail appointment letter"

Aug 16, 2017 (Day 32) - Online MYUSCIS status shows "Interview Scheduled, read the letter we mailed you..."

Aug 17, 2017 (Day 33) - Interview Appointment Letter PDF posted online---GOT AN INTERVIEW DATE!!!

Aug 21, 2017 (Day 37) - Interview Appointment Letter received in the mail, appointment for 09/27/17

Sep. 27, 2017 (Day 74) - Naturalization Interview--- read my experience here

Sep. 27, 2017 (Day 74) - Online MYUSCIS status shows "Oath Ceremony Notice mailed"

Sep. 28, 2017 (Day 75) - Oath Ceremony Letter PDF posted online--Ceremony for 10/19/17

Oct. 02, 2017 (Day 79) -  Oath Ceremony Letter received in the mail

Oct. 19, 2017 (Day 96) -  Oath Ceremony-- read my experience here

 

 

 

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Like others have said, you can relinquish your GC and apply again later... remain in the US and just visit him. Leaving to go live in Canada, or any other country, for extended periods of time can always jeopardize your LPR status. Whole point of being an LPR is to be a permanent resident of the US, meaning live here. So see if your husband really has to go to school in Canada or not, and then make a decision based on what's best for you. 


08/15/2014 : Met Online

06/30/2016 : I-129F Packet Sent

07/08/2016 : NOA 1 Received

08/25/2016 : NOA 2 Received (48 days)

11/08/2016 : Interview - APPROVED!

11/18/2016 : Visa in hand

11/23/2016 : POE - Dallas, Texas

From sending of I-129F petiton to POE - 146 days.

 

02/03/2017 - Married 

02/24/2017 - AOS packet sent

06/01/2017 - EAD/AP Combo Card Received in mail

12/06/2017 - I-485 Approved

12/14/2017 - Green Card Received in mail - No Interview

 

 

giphy.gif     giphy.gif

 

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Thank you guys for replying!

Hmm my parents friend’s friend has GC but he mostly lives in Japan. And I heard that if he come back to US(within a year) and stay for 2weeks or so, he can still keep his GC and still stay in Japan. 

Is that true??

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, Amy Suzuki said:

Thank you guys for replying!

Hmm my parents friend’s friend has GC but he mostly lives in Japan. And I heard that if he come back to US(within a year) and stay for 2weeks or so, he can still keep his GC and still stay in Japan. 

Is that true??

No

 

Bit like speeding, can you break the speed limit and not get a ticket,

Edited by Boiler

“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Posted (edited)
9 minutes ago, Amy Suzuki said:

Thank you guys for replying!

Hmm my parents friend’s friend has GC but he mostly lives in Japan. And I heard that if he come back to US(within a year) and stay for 2weeks or so, he can still keep his GC and still stay in Japan. 

Is that true??

No it's not true.

Your friend of a friend of a friend is very lucky that he's gotten away with it so far.  Next time he may be refused entry into the US or worse....ends up infront of an immigration judge/with GC revoked.

A green card is not a glorified tourist visa....although of course you're free to do what you wish, despite any advice received here.

 

Not to mention, hearsay is never entirely 100% accurate without all the details from your parents' friend's friend...so don't take what you've heard to heart, is my point. Old wives tales always abound with immigration experiences as reported by friends of friends...of friends.

Edited by Going through

Applied for Naturalization based on 5-year Residency - 96 Days To Complete Citizenship!

July 14, 2017 (Day 00) -  Submitted N400 Application, filed online

July 21, 2017 (Day 07) -  NOA Receipt received in the mail

July 22, 2017 (Day 08) - Biometrics appointment scheduled online, letter mailed out

July 25, 2017 (Day 11) - Biometrics PDF posted online

July 28, 2017 (Day 14) - Biometrics letter received in the mail, appointment for 08/08/17

Aug 08, 2017 (Day 24) - Biometrics (fingerprinting) completed

Aug 14, 2017 (Day 30) - Online EGOV status shows "Interview Scheduled, will mail appointment letter"

Aug 16, 2017 (Day 32) - Online MYUSCIS status shows "Interview Scheduled, read the letter we mailed you..."

Aug 17, 2017 (Day 33) - Interview Appointment Letter PDF posted online---GOT AN INTERVIEW DATE!!!

Aug 21, 2017 (Day 37) - Interview Appointment Letter received in the mail, appointment for 09/27/17

Sep. 27, 2017 (Day 74) - Naturalization Interview--- read my experience here

Sep. 27, 2017 (Day 74) - Online MYUSCIS status shows "Oath Ceremony Notice mailed"

Sep. 28, 2017 (Day 75) - Oath Ceremony Letter PDF posted online--Ceremony for 10/19/17

Oct. 02, 2017 (Day 79) -  Oath Ceremony Letter received in the mail

Oct. 19, 2017 (Day 96) -  Oath Ceremony-- read my experience here

 

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Amy Suzuki said:

Thank you guys for replying!

Hmm my parents friend’s friend has GC but he mostly lives in Japan. And I heard that if he come back to US(within a year) and stay for 2weeks or so, he can still keep his GC and still stay in Japan. 

Is that true??

The pattern of quick step ins will likely be an issue at some point 


YMMV

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There are 2 options:

 

1)

A) Apply for a re entry permit using form I-131. It costs around $660. In the form, mention the reason that you are joining your husband because he wants to attend a university in Canada. If you have 10 years green card, you will be likely approved for 2 years re entry permit.  Before the the 2 years end, come back to the states and apply for another re entry permit and pay the fee again. Most likely you will approved for another 2 years so the total is 4 years. This option will delay your citizenship process if you are thinking of getting one.

 

B) If you don’t have 10 years green card, the re entry permit will be valid until your conditional green card expire. Then you have to come back to the states to remove the condition. After removing the condition and get 10 years green card, you will be eligible to apply for re entry permit which hopefully will be valid for 2 years at that time.

 

2) Return your green card and start over again after you decide to move back to the states permanently. 

 

I highly recommend to avoid coming back every year or 6 months to maintain your status. There is a legal way to maintain your status while you are abroad which is getting re entry permit.

 

If I’m in your situation, I will go with the 1st option because start over the process again is a nightmare due to the delay in these days.

 

Good Luck

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If you go with him to Canada to live for 4 years, your LPR status will end and the green card will be invalid.  To return to the US your husband will have to file another petition for you and you'll go through the immigration process all over again.  I first filed a petition for my spouse and four kids when I moved from Canada to the US for grad school, then after three years I took a job back in Canada so we all moved back for three more years.  Then we decided to move back to the US, so I had to file petitions for my spouse and four kids again.  We returned to the US and never left.  The wife and kids eventually naturalized, so now they're dual citizens like me.  This was a few years ago when the immigration process was faster for spouses of US citizens.  If you plan on returning to the US after four years in Canada with your husband, I would suggest that you stay in the US for some of the time, and get re-entry permits, making sure that you follow the rules so that you can maintain your LPR status and won't have to re-do the immigration process since it takes so long these days.  Good luck!

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