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ghiath23

This form, that form should I even bother?

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Hello all and thank you kindly for taking the time to read my plea for help. I am hopeful some may be able to direct me how to approach from here.

My situation: I am a US citizen with plans on traveling to Lebanon in a few months (October) to marry my soon to spouse. My spouse resides in Syria and unfortunately secondary to the status of the state the diplomatic relations have been broken off between the US & Syria, for now. Because of this, I will need to proceed forward with the embassy at Lebanon which is the state I intend to marry in. I have read and heard ad nauseam of people's experience and the stories differ so much-- this is why I turn to you for help.

My future wife and I decided to approach the process from a married perspective, as compared to applying for the fiance route. From my understanding, upon completion of marriage, I can go to the embassy in Lebanon and begin the process with the US representative there. I have heard there is a chance of instant agreement or instant denial. Obviously we want them to agree and I am trying to set us up for success. As of this very moment, no paperwork has been filled out nor have any possible immigration agencies been notified.

My questions: What can we do to prepare in the meanwhile to maximize our chances for approval? Is there any paperwork that I should apply for in the meanwhile? Is there any agency that I should reach out to? Or should I await to getting married and beginning the process upon arrival at the US embassy in Lebanon?

Thank you so much for your consideration and feedback.

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~~Moved to IR1/CR1 Spouse Visa and Process and Procedures from K1 Process and Procedures- As the OP is getting married and will need to go the spousal route~~


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I would start by reading the guides.

You can assume that the process will take a year or so, you have plenty of opportunity to build your case during that time.

You can not start the process until you are married, and the Consulate only come intt he equation at the very end.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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I'm afraid you missunderstand; this is not an instant process, even if you live abroad, and especially not if you are resident in the USA.

As mentioned, it takes about a year. Not much you can do now, except making sure you and your spouse-to-be have birth certs, vaccinations are up to date for her and such things.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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I've never heard of what you've described, to go into a US Embassy, IV Unit, and start the process there.

Some US Embassies have USCIS offices attached - if that's the case for where you will be, then you can pursue a Direct Consular Filing of form I-130, but that's just the first phase and there is nothing 'immediate' about it.

Can you cite the source of your info? If'n you can do that, we'd be happy to vette the info for you.


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Ya know, you can find the answer to your question with the advanced search tool, when using a PC? Ditch the handphone, come back later on a PC, and try again.

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Everything about your post is 100% wrong. You cannot simply walk into an embassy and get a visa, it will take about a year. Seriously who told you this? The embassy comes into play at the very end for the interview and the embassy that deals with cases from Syria is Amman, Jordan. You have no choice in that matter unless your future spouse lives in Lebanon and requests that the case be moved there when the time comes for interview.



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Amman, Jordan is the designated Embassy for processing immigrant visas for people residing in Syria. If the US citizen petitioner has lived in Syria for at least 6 month, they can do DCF and file the I-130 in Amman as well.

To be processed at any other Embassy, you need to request that Embassy to accept the case -- and you can't submit that request until the I-130 is approved. Beirut's website has contact information on how to request transfer of your case (http://lebanon.usembassy.gov/petition_transfer.html) -- but you don't have a case for the Embassy to consider until you're finished with the I-130 approval and the NVC process.

Even though you plan to marry in Lebanon, unless your then-wife has a legal status in Lebanon that will allow her to remain there for the duration of the processing, there is no guarantee that Beirut will accept the case. Per their website, they accept third country national (i.e., non-Lebanese) on a "discretionary" basis.

There is no way to file the I-130 there (or any other post without a USCIS office) unless a consular officer determines that the case qualifies under "exceptional circumstances" and then they need to request approval to take the case from the USCIS Field Office that has jurisdiction over that post. (I believe that would be Amman, Jordan for Beirut). Take a look at the USCIS website and click on the link to "exceptional circumstances" to assess your possibiities (http://www.uscis.gov/i-130). Generally speaking, if USCIS believes the political situation in a country warrants an "exceptional circumstance" approval, they will give blanket authorization to the State Dept to accept the I-130 petitions of those nationals at specific consular sections/embassies. There is no blanket authorization in place for Syrians, so it would be an uphill battle to get approval to file at the Embassy in Beirut (or any other Embassy, since you live in the US and not in Syria) unless there is something more to your case than the fact that she lives in Syria. Finally, even if you got approval to file in Beirut, it is not an instantaneous process -- they will need time to get the USCIS authorization to accept the petition, find time to fit in appointments -- including the medical, review your documents, etc.

As others have said, it would be good for you to review the CR1/IR1 guides to get a better idea about the process. Good luck as you try to sort this all out!

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Amman, Jordan is the designated Embassy for processing immigrant visas for people residing in Syria. If the US citizen petitioner has lived in Syria for at least 6 month, they can do DCF and file the I-130 in Amman as well.

To be processed at any other Embassy, you need to request that Embassy to accept the case -- and you can't submit that request until the I-130 is approved. Beirut's website has contact information on how to request transfer of your case (http://lebanon.usembassy.gov/petition_transfer.html) -- but you don't have a case for the Embassy to consider until you're finished with the I-130 approval and the NVC process.

Even though you plan to marry in Lebanon, unless your then-wife has a legal status in Lebanon that will allow her to remain there for the duration of the processing, there is no guarantee that Beirut will accept the case. Per their website, they accept third country national (i.e., non-Lebanese) on a "discretionary" basis.

There is no way to file the I-130 there (or any other post without a USCIS office) unless a consular officer determines that the case qualifies under "exceptional circumstances" and then they need to request approval to take the case from the USCIS Field Office that has jurisdiction over that post. (I believe that would be Amman, Jordan for Beirut). Take a look at the USCIS website and click on the link to "exceptional circumstances" to assess your possibiities (http://www.uscis.gov/i-130). Generally speaking, if USCIS believes the political situation in a country warrants an "exceptional circumstance" approval, they will give blanket authorization to the State Dept to accept the I-130 petitions of those nationals at specific consular sections/embassies. There is no blanket authorization in place for Syrians, so it would be an uphill battle to get approval to file at the Embassy in Beirut (or any other Embassy, since you live in the US and not in Syria) unless there is something more to your case than the fact that she lives in Syria. Finally, even if you got approval to file in Beirut, it is not an instantaneous process -- they will need time to get the USCIS authorization to accept the petition, find time to fit in appointments -- including the medical, review your documents, etc.

As others have said, it would be good for you to review the CR1/IR1 guides to get a better idea about the process. Good luck as you try to sort this all out!

I already said this :)

Are you sure you're not talking about a tourist visa?

you can't walk in for a tourist visa, either



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I already said this :)

you can't walk in for a tourist visa, either

You said part of it -- plus, it never hurts to reeat some things, especially with more detail. IF it bothers you, just skip reading the post. Edited by jan22

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Also, how certain are those that say Lebanon is not an option? Is this new? I only ask because a friend of mine did this exact process that i described for her now spouse, approximately 6months ago... (went to Lebanon from US and her Syrian husband married there and the process was facilitated by the embassy inn Lebanon)

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Nobody said it was not possible, there are certain parameters to be met.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Also, how certain are those that say Lebanon is not an option? Is this new? I only ask because a friend of mine did this exact process that i described for her now spouse, approximately 6months ago... (went to Lebanon from US and her Syrian husband married there and the process was facilitated by the embassy inn Lebanon)

The only way to transfer to Lebanon is if the beneficiary is a legal resident there. Once again, all cases from Syria are routed through Amman, you have no choice in the matter if not legally residing in Lebanon.



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