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Shauna&Wael

Should I attend the interview?

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Hello all,

Firstly would like to thank everyone here for being so helpful and friendly!

I'm having second thoughts about my decision not to attend the interview with my husband at the US embassy in Tunis. I decided against doing so because I really need to save the money I have for my husband's ticket here, and to start our life together once he gets here. However, it seems that it can be a very good thing for the case based on what others have said here. How important is it that I go? At this time I'm just focused on making my husband as prepared and confident as possible so he won't necessarily "need" me there. Any suggestions are greatly appreciated.


"A million years if I could live,
A thousand lives if I could give,
I would spend it all again with you,
Don't forget where you belong,
Only with me you are strong,
Not even the gods above can break,
Baby what we have"

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What are your red flags?


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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My fiance interviewed in Tunis. It will be different since you are already married and different type of visa, but....

My fiance's English is very beginning. We just had an enormous amount of evidence all paperwork was perfect and in order. He had absolutely no problems. And he even is from Libya,and had a problem with a different name on his original petition than his newest passport.

I think as long as you have everything and order and plenty of evidence, that it should be fine.

Also, I do not even know if they allow you to attend the interview in Tunis. Have you asked them?


19-Sept-14: I-129F Delivered

23-Sept-14: NOA1 (I-797C ~ Texas Lockbox accepted I-129F)

24-Sept-14: NOA1 (E-mail & Text)

Sent to California Service Center

3-Nov-14: Requested expedite by mailed letter with UN Human Rights Reports (Humanitarian Situation)

14-Nov-14: NOA2 (I-129F Petition Approved ~ E-mail & Text)

1-Dec-14: NVC Received Case

2-Dec-14: NVC Case Number Assigned

9-Dec-14: Embassy Received

3-Feb-15: "Package 3" Received/Turned In

25-Feb-15: "Package 4" - Received Interview Date

19-Mar-15: Interview ~ Approved

27-Mar-15: Visa Issued

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Think of it this way: If you're not on the premises and the visa is refused, you'll spend one hell of a lot more money (and time, and heartache) trying to extricate yourselves from the unholy mess.*

*speaking from experience

The petitioner's presence on the consular premises adds credibility that can't be duplicated. The best weapon that the beneficiary has, to prove a bona fide relationship, is the petitioner's U.S. passport, to hand to the consul.


06-04-2007 = TSC stamps postal return-receipt for I-129f.

06-11-2007 = NOA1 date (unknown to me).

07-20-2007 = Phoned Immigration Officer; got WAC#; where's NOA1?

09-25-2007 = Touch (first-ever).

09-28-2007 = NOA1, 23 days after their 45-day promise to send it (grrrr).

10-20 & 11-14-2007 = Phoned ImmOffs; "still pending."

12-11-2007 = 180 days; file is "between workstations, may be early Jan."; touches 12/11 & 12/12.

12-18-2007 = Call; file is with Division 9 ofcr. (bckgrnd check); e-prompt to shake it; touch.

12-19-2007 = NOA2 by e-mail & web, dated 12-18-07 (187 days; 201 per VJ); in mail 12/24/07.

01-09-2008 = File from USCIS to NVC, 1-4-08; NVC creates file, 1/15/08; to consulate 1/16/08.

01-23-2008 = Consulate gets file; outdated Packet 4 mailed to fiancee 1/27/08; rec'd 3/3/08.

04-29-2008 = Fiancee's 4-min. consular interview, 8:30 a.m.; much evidence brought but not allowed to be presented (consul: "More proof! Second interview! Bring your fiance!").

05-05-2008 = Infuriating $12 call to non-English-speaking consulate appointment-setter.

05-06-2008 = Better $12 call to English-speaker; "joint" interview date 6/30/08 (my selection).

06-30-2008 = Stokes Interrogations w/Ecuadorian (not USC); "wait 2 weeks; we'll mail her."

07-2008 = Daily calls to DOS: "currently processing"; 8/05 = Phoned consulate, got Section Chief; wrote him.

08-07-08 = E-mail from consulate, promising to issue visa "as soon as we get her passport" (on 8/12, per DHL).

08-27-08 = Phoned consulate (they "couldn't find" our file); visa DHL'd 8/28; in hand 9/1; through POE on 10/9 with NO hassles(!).

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What are your red flags?

I guess the fact that we got married a month after my first trip to see him, but I have proof that we were talking much longer before my first visit. I've visited him 3 times in total. What, in your opinion, are the most common red flags people get denied for?


"A million years if I could live,
A thousand lives if I could give,
I would spend it all again with you,
Don't forget where you belong,
Only with me you are strong,
Not even the gods above can break,
Baby what we have"

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Share on other sites

My fiance interviewed in Tunis. It will be different since you are already married and different type of visa, but....

My fiance's English is very beginning. We just had an enormous amount of evidence all paperwork was perfect and in order. He had absolutely no problems. And he even is from Libya,and had a problem with a different name on his original petition than his newest passport.

I think as long as you have everything and order and plenty of evidence, that it should be fine.

Also, I do not even know if they allow you to attend the interview in Tunis. Have you asked them?

So I'm guessing you didn't attend the interview? I believe I've read that people have joined their spouse's interview in Tunis. I do think I have plenty of evidence, I have compiled continued evidence since the I-130 was approved. My husband's English is very good, almost proficient.

Think of it this way: If you're not on the premises and the visa is refused, you'll spend one hell of a lot more money (and time, and heartache) trying to extricate yourselves from the unholy mess.*

*speaking from experience

The petitioner's presence on the consular premises adds credibility that can't be duplicated. The best weapon that the beneficiary has, to prove a bona fide relationship, is the petitioner's U.S. passport, to hand to the consul.

I completely agree it can't hurt anything, but do you really think if everything else is in order that one thing would be the deciding factor between a bonafide marriage or not? Do they care at all that not everyone has that much money to throw around, especially considering all the money it takes for the case alone.


"A million years if I could live,
A thousand lives if I could give,
I would spend it all again with you,
Don't forget where you belong,
Only with me you are strong,
Not even the gods above can break,
Baby what we have"

Share this post


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Share on other sites

Think of it this way: If you're not on the premises and the visa is refused, you'll spend one hell of a lot more money (and time, and heartache) trying to extricate yourselves from the unholy mess.*

*speaking from experience

The petitioner's presence on the consular premises adds credibility that can't be duplicated. The best weapon that the beneficiary has, to prove a bona fide relationship, is the petitioner's U.S. passport, to hand to the consul.

I agree 100%.They asked my Wife where I was and she told them ..outside waiting on me. There is a good chance that they will ask where you are and it does make a Difference.

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I guess the fact that we got married a month after my first trip to see him, but I have proof that we were talking much longer before my first visit. I've visited him 3 times in total. What, in your opinion, are the most common red flags people get denied for?

Vert traditional society so anything against societal norms.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Vert traditional society so anything against societal norms.

Can we get a teency more specific than that? Lol :)


"A million years if I could live,
A thousand lives if I could give,
I would spend it all again with you,
Don't forget where you belong,
Only with me you are strong,
Not even the gods above can break,
Baby what we have"

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I agree 100%.They asked my Wife where I was and she told them ..outside waiting on me. There is a good chance that they will ask where you are and it does make a Difference.

I'm going to keep the assumption that any CO in regards to a spousal visa will ask where is your spouse during the interview. But I strongly believe saying the spouse isn't there isn't an automatic denial or HUGE red flag. Some people genuinely can't be there, I think the reasoning or explanation is where things get tricky.


"A million years if I could live,
A thousand lives if I could give,
I would spend it all again with you,
Don't forget where you belong,
Only with me you are strong,
Not even the gods above can break,
Baby what we have"

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Older

Divorced

Children

Not of child bearing age

Different religion

Different ethnicity

Limited face time

Made contact on the web

Limited visits

Marrying soon after meeting

you get the idea


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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I didn't go to my wife's interview and when my now wife couldn't answer a question about my finances she was put in AP. This caused us a great deal of stress and anguish. It was one of the darkest periods of my life. We didn't even know if she would be approved.. I'm sure if I was there during the interview that wouldn't have happened. I strongly suggest you attend. Especially since it is Tunisia.

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No I did not attend. He had no problems. And again his English is not good. And we haven't had a lot of face to face time. Like I said, all paperwork was perfect and organized plus a ton of evidence which proved everything was real. Also - we practiced all the interview questions ahead of time. They asked my parents names, my job, my birthday, and about his work. Practicing made him less nervous in the interview.

So I'm guessing you didn't attend the interview? I believe I've read that people have joined their spouse's interview in Tunis. I do think I have plenty of evidence, I have compiled continued evidence since the I-130 was approved. My husband's English is very good, almost proficient.

I completely agree it can't hurt anything, but do you really think if everything else is in order that one thing would be the deciding factor between a bonafide marriage or not? Do they care at all that not everyone has that much money to throw around, especially considering all the money it takes for the case alone.


19-Sept-14: I-129F Delivered

23-Sept-14: NOA1 (I-797C ~ Texas Lockbox accepted I-129F)

24-Sept-14: NOA1 (E-mail & Text)

Sent to California Service Center

3-Nov-14: Requested expedite by mailed letter with UN Human Rights Reports (Humanitarian Situation)

14-Nov-14: NOA2 (I-129F Petition Approved ~ E-mail & Text)

1-Dec-14: NVC Received Case

2-Dec-14: NVC Case Number Assigned

9-Dec-14: Embassy Received

3-Feb-15: "Package 3" Received/Turned In

25-Feb-15: "Package 4" - Received Interview Date

19-Mar-15: Interview ~ Approved

27-Mar-15: Visa Issued

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