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Fiancee Visa for an arranged marriage. Possible?

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Hello

In our culture/religion, premarital dating is discouraged. It isn't an "arranged" marriage in the true sense. The process usually happens like this:

1)The boy (can be girl) takes an interest in a girl.

2)(optional) The boy talks to his parents about the interest

3)The boys parents (or boy) talk to the girls parents and put fourth a marriage proposal

4)Girls parents discuss with girl and if the GIRL AGREES, the boy and girl become engaged.

The boys interest can come from whatever correspondence the two have had or even the recommendation from others regarding the girl. Ideally, the boy and girl have never dated, but they are allowed to communicate/see each other physically to ensure compatibility.

This is the dominant style of marriage in the Middle East and is also very common in other parts of Asia and Africa.

My question is, If one was to apply for a fiancee visa with this type of hookup, would it work? What would they put in the section where their meetings are to be described and proved? The boy is American and the girl is a British citizen. They have met several time on different occasions but do not have any current proof of meeting (photos, etc)

comments or personal experiences would be appreciated.

Thank You.

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It is possible. You might have more luck looking the Middle Eastern forums for more specifics on the situation as they might have more knowledge on the topic (although you are dealing with the UK). You will need some proof of meeting. Any passport stamps? Pics? Bills from visits? Anything? My only real concern would be that in the UK if you interviewed in London for example, the adjucators might not be as understanding of the practice of an arranged marriage because it is just not as common.


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You should not mix both of them. You are either engaged or married. From my experience, you would not benefit from a K-1 visa if you are already married. So, you either get married and file an I-130, or you just get engaged and do all the explanation backed up with proof. I'm sure the USCIS is aware of that kind of culture and in the I-129F instruction form, you are expected to provide explanation and proof of the culture etc....

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Hello

In our culture/religion, premarital dating is discouraged. It isn't an "arranged" marriage in the true sense. The process usually happens like this:

1)The boy (can be girl) takes an interest in a girl.

2)(optional) The boy talks to his parents about the interest

3)The boys parents (or boy) talk to the girls parents and put fourth a marriage proposal

4)Girls parents discuss with girl and if the GIRL AGREES, the boy and girl become engaged.

The boys interest can come from whatever correspondence the two have had or even the recommendation from others regarding the girl. Ideally, the boy and girl have never dated, but they are allowed to communicate/see each other physically to ensure compatibility.

This is the dominant style of marriage in the Middle East and is also very common in other parts of Asia and Africa.

My question is, If one was to apply for a fiancee visa with this type of hookup, would it work? What would they put in the section where their meetings are to be described and proved? The boy is American and the girl is a British citizen. They have met several time on different occasions but do not have any current proof of meeting (photos, etc)

comments or personal experiences would be appreciated.

Thank You.

This kind of relationship is no problem. Photos would be secondary evidence of meeting anyway. Do either of them have passport stamps or boarding passes from within the past two years that would put them in their fiance's country of residence? If so, that's the evidence they need. If not, they'll need to meet again. Sounds to me like marriage would be very good alternative though, then take the spouse visa route. Up to you.


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Well there has to be a proof of meeting.. They have to meet before filing if they haven't met for the last two years.. It is needed for filing and also for the interview..


My Journey:

We met through a study-abroad program in Shanghai, China in August of 2009

We got engaged March of 2010

I received my K1 VISA in 6 months (June-December 2010)

We were married 04/02/2011
I received my conditional 2-year greencard (AOS) in 2.5 months with no interview (April-June 2011)

Our son was born 02/03/2013

I received my masters degree in Speech-Language Pathology 04/17/2013

I received my 10-year greencard (ROC) in 3 months with no interview (March-June 2013)

My husband returned from deployment 06/20/2013

My naturalization journey took 4 months (April-August 2014)

I became a US citizen on 08/01/2014

Received passport in 3 weeks (regular processing)

Thank you, VJ! smile.png

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Exception to the meeting requirement are rare. You have to prove neither of you are capable of travel ( living in iron lungs or something that severe ) or that you are highly documented members of a religion that prohibits you from meeting even in the presence of escorts. Most religions prohibit the couple from being alone together not from meeting. If you can should that you both are members of one of the minority versions than maybe. Otherwise plan on meeting.


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Well there has to be a proof of meeting.. They have to meet before filing if they haven't met for the last two years.. It is needed for filing and also for the interview..

Question 18 on the 129F form states the following:

"Describe the circumstances under which you met. If you have not personally met each other, explain how the relationship was established. ....... Explain also in detail any reasons you may have for requesting that the requirement that you and your fiance(e) must have met should not apply to you.

So technically, there doesn't have to be proof of meeting.

If there is someone reading who was in a similar circumstance, what did you put in this section.

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Question 18 on the 129F form states the following:

"Describe the circumstances under which you met. If you have not personally met each other, explain how the relationship was established. ....... Explain also in detail any reasons you may have for requesting that the requirement that you and your fiance(e) must have met should not apply to you.

So technically, there doesn't have to be proof of meeting.

If there is someone reading who was in a similar circumstance, what did you put in this section.

You HAVE to have met in person in the last two years. The only way around this is explained in the I-129F instructions here: http://canberra.usembassy.gov/obtain_police_cert.html page 1 under "Who may file..". I have never seen on instance of this being approved because there is ALWAYS a way to meet in person.

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Question 18 on the 129F form states the following:

"Describe the circumstances under which you met. If you have not personally met each other, explain how the relationship was established. ....... Explain also in detail any reasons you may have for requesting that the requirement that you and your fiance(e) must have met should not apply to you.

So technically, there doesn't have to be proof of meeting.

If there is someone reading who was in a similar circumstance, what did you put in this section.

People in a similar situation eventually realize they are required to meet in person within the two years prior to filing. Read further about the conditions required for the requirement not to apply to you and you'll come to the same conclusion. The arranged marriage portions of your circumstances are fine but you CAN meet in person, so you must.


Facts are cheap...knowing how to use them is precious...
Understanding the big picture is priceless. Anonymous

Google Who is Pushbrk?

A Warning to Green Card Holders About Voting

http://www.visajourney.com/forums/topic/606646-a-warning-to-green-card-holders-about-voting/

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5. What Documents Do You Need to Prove That You Can Legally Marry?

A. Provide copies of evidence that you and your fiancé(e) have personally met within the last two years; or if you have never met within the last two years, provide a detailed explanation and evidence of the extreme hardship or customary, cultural or social practices that have prohibited your meeting; and

B. Provide original statements from you and your fiancé(e) whom you plan to marry within 90 days of his or her admission, and copies of any evidence you wish to submit to establish your mutual intent; and

C. If either of you is of an age that requires special consent or permission for you to marry in the jurisdiction where your marriage will occur, give proof of that consent or permission; and

D. If either you or your fiancé(e) were married before, give copies of documents showing that each prior marriage was legally terminated.

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The above is a direct copy from the Instructions for I-129F

Yes and even those are somewhat misleading in that many take hope from them when they shouldn't. The current situation isn't even close. Absolutely NOTHING is keeping them from arranging another meeting.


Facts are cheap...knowing how to use them is precious...
Understanding the big picture is priceless. Anonymous

Google Who is Pushbrk?

A Warning to Green Card Holders About Voting

http://www.visajourney.com/forums/topic/606646-a-warning-to-green-card-holders-about-voting/

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Well, it might be more difficult for them to be approved, but nothing is impossible..

I think its always easier to join the norm than to try and be the exception.

Are they not allowed to meet? The beneficiary might have a hard time during the interview..

Goodluck and let us know what happens. It's quite interesting, and I wish them luck!


My Journey:

We met through a study-abroad program in Shanghai, China in August of 2009

We got engaged March of 2010

I received my K1 VISA in 6 months (June-December 2010)

We were married 04/02/2011
I received my conditional 2-year greencard (AOS) in 2.5 months with no interview (April-June 2011)

Our son was born 02/03/2013

I received my masters degree in Speech-Language Pathology 04/17/2013

I received my 10-year greencard (ROC) in 3 months with no interview (March-June 2013)

My husband returned from deployment 06/20/2013

My naturalization journey took 4 months (April-August 2014)

I became a US citizen on 08/01/2014

Received passport in 3 weeks (regular processing)

Thank you, VJ! smile.png

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Yes and even those are somewhat misleading in that many take hope from them when they shouldn't. The current situation isn't even close. Absolutely NOTHING is keeping them from arranging another meeting.

Yea that's true. They are better of meeting as what might (in the OP's opinion) constitute "detailed explanation and evidence of the extreme hardship or customary, cultural or social practices that have prohibited your meeting" might not be convincing enough for USCIS.

Edited by Tero

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