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UK dual citizenship questions

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Hi everyone,

I am trying to decide whether or not to pursue dual citizenship for my son. I'm a U.S. citizen, and my husband is from the U.K. I didn't even realize that dual citizenship was possible until recently. It seems like a lot of immigrants who I've talked to like to register their kids as citizens in their home countries. What are the reasons for doing so? Is it something we should do? And finally, how exactly does one go about doing it?

My husband will be starting the naturalization process soon, and although he doesn't have any qualms about ditching his British citizenship, I think it would be nice if he could maintain that part of his identity. Is there anything special he would need to do to have dual citizenship?

Other than traveling to the UK occasionally, we have no plans to ever settle there permanently...not sure if that influences the decision.

Thanks!


Gareth from England, Jennifer from USA

Vermont Service Center

10 Nov 2004 - I-129F mailed to Vermont

12 Nov 2004 - I-129F received at Service Center

19 Nov 2004 - 1st NOA received through mail

19 Nov 2004 - I-129F approved! (found out via email)

26 Nov 2004 - 2nd NOA received through mail

03 Dec 2004 - Letter from NVC dated December 1, 2004 stating case is being forwarded to London

13 Dec 2004 - Packet 3 received

04 Jan 2005 - I-134 and supporting evidence sent to Gareth via registered post

05 Jan 2005 - Packet 3 forms sent to London Embassy

17 Jan 2005 - Gareth emailed embassy to ask about scheduling of interview

18 Jan 2005 - Email confirmation from embassy noting February 28th interview!

20 Jan 2005 - Packet 4 received

28 Feb 2005 - Interview in London *APPROVED!*

23 Jul 2005 - Wedding date! Traditional church service, reception, etc. planned (We tempted fate a bit by planning before we had the visa, but it worked out!)

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What if when your son grows up he wants to live there? or go work there or go to school there. Maybe you have no plans to live there but what about his future and his ideas?


-------------------------------------------- as1cE-a0g410010MjgybHN8MDA5Njk4c3xNYXJyaWVkIGZvcg.gif

Your I-129f was approved in 5 days from your NOA1 date.

Your interview took 67 days from your I-129F NOA1 date.

AOS was approved in 2 months and 8 days without interview.

ROC was approved in 3 months and 2 days without interview.

I am a Citizen of the United States of America. 04/16/13

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What if when your son grows up he wants to live there? or go work there or go to school there. Maybe you have no plans to live there but what about his future and his ideas?

My understanding is that dual citizenship expires when he's 18, at which time he would need to reapply for British citizenship. I am wondering what the advantages of registering him as a minor would be.


Gareth from England, Jennifer from USA

Vermont Service Center

10 Nov 2004 - I-129F mailed to Vermont

12 Nov 2004 - I-129F received at Service Center

19 Nov 2004 - 1st NOA received through mail

19 Nov 2004 - I-129F approved! (found out via email)

26 Nov 2004 - 2nd NOA received through mail

03 Dec 2004 - Letter from NVC dated December 1, 2004 stating case is being forwarded to London

13 Dec 2004 - Packet 3 received

04 Jan 2005 - I-134 and supporting evidence sent to Gareth via registered post

05 Jan 2005 - Packet 3 forms sent to London Embassy

17 Jan 2005 - Gareth emailed embassy to ask about scheduling of interview

18 Jan 2005 - Email confirmation from embassy noting February 28th interview!

20 Jan 2005 - Packet 4 received

28 Feb 2005 - Interview in London *APPROVED!*

23 Jul 2005 - Wedding date! Traditional church service, reception, etc. planned (We tempted fate a bit by planning before we had the visa, but it worked out!)

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Iv never heard of it expiring once you have citizenship, all of my cousins obtained dual US/Canada when they were children and its never " expired " They are well into their 40tys now.

What makes citizenship expire at 18yrs old?


-------------------------------------------- as1cE-a0g410010MjgybHN8MDA5Njk4c3xNYXJyaWVkIGZvcg.gif

Your I-129f was approved in 5 days from your NOA1 date.

Your interview took 67 days from your I-129F NOA1 date.

AOS was approved in 2 months and 8 days without interview.

ROC was approved in 3 months and 2 days without interview.

I am a Citizen of the United States of America. 04/16/13

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I was wondering the same.

And why would your Husband go to all the time and trouble in relinquishing British Citizenship.

You can register the birth abroad, getting a passport is usually a better bet.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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I'm from New Zealand, my husband is a USC and we're expecting our first child. I'm here in the US currently doing my AOS from a K1 visa. When our child is born I fully intend for him to have dual kiwi/US citizenship. If he/she decides in later years that they wish to explore down under a NZ citizenship and passport will give them the opportunity to live and work in either New Zealand or Australia. I plan to also hold dual when it comes to citizenship down the track.


AOS from K1 Visa

01.20.2011 Posted in AOS, EAD and AP documentation

01.25.2011 Signed for in Chicago

01.31.2011 NOA1s x 3 produced

02.08.2011 NOA1s x 3 hard copies received

02.22.2011 Transferred to CSC

02.28.2011 Biometrics done Fort Worth, Tx

03.18.2011 EAD/AP approved for production

03.24.2011 2 year conditional Green Card approved for production

03.28.2011 EAD/AP card received in the mail

03.29.2011 Welcome to the United States of America letter received in the mail

03.30.2011 Green Card received in the mail.

Removal of Conditions

01.19.2013 Posted I-751 and supporting documentation

01.26.2013 Package delivered to VSC

01.28.2013 NOA1 produced

01.29.2013 Check for filing fee and biometrics cashed

02.02.2013 NOA1 received

02.07.2013 Notice of Biometrics appointment received

02.27.2013 Biometrics done

06.14.2013 10 year unconditional Green Card approved for production

06.19.2013 Congratulations letter received in the mail

06.21.2013 10 year unconditional Green Card received in the mail

Naturalization

07.03.2016 Posted N-400 and supporting documentation

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My misunderstanding regarding expiration came about due to this, which clearly states that certain forms of citizenship expire at age 18:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/eligibility/children/britishoverseascitizen/

Now I realize that I was looking at the wrong page entirely. I didn't realize that my son is automatically British by descent, nor did I realize that my husband does not relinquish British citizenship when he becomes American. That's why I came here to ASK. Unfortunately the vast majority of you have been thoroughly unhelpful and rude. If I were an expert on immigration law (as you all clearly are), chances are I wouldn't have come here seeking advice. I still don't know how I go about registering my son with the UK, or what, if anything, my husband needs to do once he naturalizes here. Thanks for nothing.


Gareth from England, Jennifer from USA

Vermont Service Center

10 Nov 2004 - I-129F mailed to Vermont

12 Nov 2004 - I-129F received at Service Center

19 Nov 2004 - 1st NOA received through mail

19 Nov 2004 - I-129F approved! (found out via email)

26 Nov 2004 - 2nd NOA received through mail

03 Dec 2004 - Letter from NVC dated December 1, 2004 stating case is being forwarded to London

13 Dec 2004 - Packet 3 received

04 Jan 2005 - I-134 and supporting evidence sent to Gareth via registered post

05 Jan 2005 - Packet 3 forms sent to London Embassy

17 Jan 2005 - Gareth emailed embassy to ask about scheduling of interview

18 Jan 2005 - Email confirmation from embassy noting February 28th interview!

20 Jan 2005 - Packet 4 received

28 Feb 2005 - Interview in London *APPROVED!*

23 Jul 2005 - Wedding date! Traditional church service, reception, etc. planned (We tempted fate a bit by planning before we had the visa, but it worked out!)

Share this post


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Share on other sites
I am trying to decide whether or not to pursue dual citizenship for my son. I'm a U.S. citizen, and my husband is from the U.K. I didn't even realize that dual citizenship was possible until recently. It seems like a lot of immigrants who I've talked to like to register their kids as citizens in their home countries. What are the reasons for doing so? Is it something we should do? And finally, how exactly does one go about doing it?

My husband will be starting the naturalization process soon, and although he doesn't have any qualms about ditching his British citizenship, I think it would be nice if he could maintain that part of his identity. Is there anything special he would need to do to have dual citizenship?

Other than traveling to the UK occasionally, we have no plans to ever settle there permanently...not sure if that influences the decision.

1. There is nothing special your husband has to do to become a dual national (used to be dual citizenship, now dual national). Once he gets his US citizen he now has two citizenships, that's it. Nothing special (I'm dual Aussie/UK). Here is a link to prove that he doesn't lose his UK: http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/dualnationality/ (click on the "eligibility" and "children" links on the left as well)

2. I got my UK passport simply by applying for it. I sent off all my supporting paperwork and now have a UK passport. This link talks about other stuff and honestly I didn't read it to in-depth because I did the passport thing, not the "registering" thing: http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/eligibility/children/britishcitizen/bornabroad/

As for reasons why, it becomes harder to get the older the child gets (well used to be, and it's not a big deal to do it now while you think about it). A UK passport is a great passport to have. It's actually an EU passport which means they can travel to any place in the European Union without a visa. They could move to Paris, or Italy or whatever else without issue because they're a EU citizen.

Our children will be getting both Aussie and US citizenship. If I were able to get them UK I would but unless I lived in the UK for a minimum of 3 years I cannot pass it on (this is because I got mine by descent, like your children will), and I haven't stayed in the UK for that long.

My misunderstanding regarding expiration came about due to this, which clearly states that certain forms of citizenship expire at age 18:

http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/eligibility/children/britishoverseascitizen/

Now I realize that I was looking at the wrong page entirely. I didn't realize that my son is automatically British by descent, nor did I realize that my husband does not relinquish British citizenship when he becomes American. That's why I came here to ASK. Unfortunately the vast majority of you have been thoroughly unhelpful and rude. If I were an expert on immigration law (as you all clearly are), chances are I wouldn't have come here seeking advice. I still don't know how I go about registering my son with the UK, or what, if anything, my husband needs to do once he naturalizes here. Thanks for nothing.

Sorry I was a bit late hitting enter. my links in my previous post should help you.

Edited by Vanessa&Tony

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1. There is nothing special your husband has to do to become a dual national (used to be dual citizenship, now dual national). Once he gets his US citizen he now has two citizenships, that's it. Nothing special (I'm dual Aussie/UK). Here is a link to prove that he doesn't lose his UK: http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/dualnationality/ (click on the "eligibility" and "children" links on the left as well)

2. I got my UK passport simply by applying for it. I sent off all my supporting paperwork and now have a UK passport. This link talks about other stuff and honestly I didn't read it to in-depth because I did the passport thing, not the "registering" thing: http://www.ukba.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/eligibility/children/britishcitizen/bornabroad/

As for reasons why, it becomes harder to get the older the child gets (well used to be, and it's not a big deal to do it now while you think about it). A UK passport is a great passport to have. It's actually an EU passport which means they can travel to any place in the European Union without a visa. They could move to Paris, or Italy or whatever else without issue because they're a EU citizen.

Our children will be getting both Aussie and US citizenship. If I were able to get them UK I would but unless I lived in the UK for a minimum of 3 years I cannot pass it on, and I haven't stayed in the UK for that long.

Sorry I was a bit late hitting enter. my links in my previous post should help you.

Thank you SO much for answering my questions! You have been very helpful. :)


Gareth from England, Jennifer from USA

Vermont Service Center

10 Nov 2004 - I-129F mailed to Vermont

12 Nov 2004 - I-129F received at Service Center

19 Nov 2004 - 1st NOA received through mail

19 Nov 2004 - I-129F approved! (found out via email)

26 Nov 2004 - 2nd NOA received through mail

03 Dec 2004 - Letter from NVC dated December 1, 2004 stating case is being forwarded to London

13 Dec 2004 - Packet 3 received

04 Jan 2005 - I-134 and supporting evidence sent to Gareth via registered post

05 Jan 2005 - Packet 3 forms sent to London Embassy

17 Jan 2005 - Gareth emailed embassy to ask about scheduling of interview

18 Jan 2005 - Email confirmation from embassy noting February 28th interview!

20 Jan 2005 - Packet 4 received

28 Feb 2005 - Interview in London *APPROVED!*

23 Jul 2005 - Wedding date! Traditional church service, reception, etc. planned (We tempted fate a bit by planning before we had the visa, but it worked out!)

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