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tokori

US citizen abroad wanting to bring child to US..

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Filed: Timeline

I am American, my husband is German. We have been living abroad over a year. I have maintained my US domicile

My son was born in the EU, has his EU citizenship but we have yet to file for his US citizenship.

I would like to DCF for them but since he has traveled to the US and back as an 'Austrian citizen' only, I am wonder what exactly we would need to do for him to DCF for US citizenship as well?

Since he is well under 18 I am having trouble finding much information online other then all US citizens must enter the US with a US passport..

:wacko:

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
Timeline
I am American, my husband is German. We have been living abroad over a year. I have maintained my US domicile

My son was born in the EU, has his EU citizenship but we have yet to file for his US citizenship.

I would like to DCF for them but since he has traveled to the US and back as an 'Austrian citizen' only, I am wonder what exactly we would need to do for him to DCF for US citizenship as well?

Since he is well under 18 I am having trouble finding much information online other then all US citizens must enter the US with a US passport..

:wacko:

hi here is what they say on the USCIS site concerning the citizen ship for your child

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/men...000b92ca60aRCRD

as for the DVC you can click on the guide above it will show the DVC section where you can read the full process ,

good luck


 

129f for K1 visa filed in march 07 check my timeline for full info

03 March 2008 , received welcome letter and 2 year GC yeahhhhhhhhhhhhh

22 NOV 2009 to lift condition GC expires 22 Feb 2010

24 Nov 09 send in I 751 ( ROC , in VT )

25 Nov 09 Your item was delivered at 12:10 PM in SAINT ALBANS, VT 05479 to INS .

30 Nov 09 Check Cashed

21 Dec 09 biometric

On March 9, 2010, we ordered production of your new card.

12 March 2010 received approval letter in mail

16 March 2010 10 year Green Card received in mail exp date March 09 / 2020

April 14/2017 send N400 

04/25/17 credit card charged 

04/25/17 e mail NOA send 

05/01/17 hard copy of NOA dated 04/25 received in mail

05/06/17 biometric hard copy in mail 

05/19/17 Biometric appointment in Hartford CT 

07/17/17 Inline for Interview 

07/24/17 Interview letter in mail 

08/24/17 Interview in Springfield MA ... Yes Aproved

09/14/17 Oath Ceremony .... done I am a US citizen

09/22/17 Applied for Passport ( per reg mail ) 

10/04/17 got passport in mail  

10/13/17 got certificate in mail  , updated status with social security office 

AM DONE YEAHHHHHHHHHHH 

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File the CRBA and get a US passport at the nearest US embassy ASAP. Once your child obtains US citizenship, you don't have to do anything for DCF for his part.


Immigration Process (DCF Japan)

08/06/2008 I-130 petition at Tokyo, Japan

08/13/2008 I-130 approved

|

| Waited until we were ready to move back

|

07/13/2009 IV interview at Tokyo, Japan

07/15/2009 IV(IR-1) in hand

Post-DCF

07/29/2009 POE at Las Vegas

08/17/2009 GC(10yrs) received

Click here for the detailed timeline.

Done with USCIS until

- naturalization in May 2012 or

- GC replacement in February 2019

CXmLm7.png

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A minor clarification. If you're a US Citizen parent who has lived in the US for the required time (I think it's five years, at least two of which were after the age of 14), then your child IS a citizen automatically at the time of birth by the action of the law, and there's nothing you can do or fail to do which will change that. It's as though he was born inside the USA. See INA 301(g).

What your child lacks isn't US citizenship, it's documentation of his US citizenship. For that, file a CRBA, and/or apply for a passport.

Your US citizen child technically violated the law when he traveled to the US without a US passport. Don't worry, though, there's no punishment prescribed in the law, and I've never heard of it being an issue. Just get him a passport before his next trip.


04 Apr, 2004: Got married

05 Apr, 2004: I-130 Sent to CSC

13 Apr, 2004: I-130 NOA 1

19 Apr, 2004: I-129F Sent to MSC

29 Apr, 2004: I-129F NOA 1

13 Aug, 2004: I-130 Approved by CSC

28 Dec, 2004: I-130 Case Complete at NVC

18 Jan, 2005: Got the visa approved in Caracas

22 Jan, 2005: Flew home together! CCS->MIA->SFO

25 May, 2005: I-129F finally approved! We won't pursue it.

8 June, 2006: Our baby girl is born!

24 Oct, 2006: Window for filing I-751 opens

25 Oct, 2006: I-751 mailed to CSC

18 Nov, 2006: I-751 NOA1 received from CSC

30 Nov, 2006: I-751 Biometrics taken

05 Apr, 2007: I-751 approved, card production ordered

23 Jan, 2008: N-400 sent to CSC via certified mail

19 Feb, 2008: N-400 Biometrics taken

27 Mar, 2008: Naturalization interview notice received (NOA2 for N-400)

30 May, 2008: Naturalization interview, passed the test!

17 June, 2008: Naturalization oath notice mailed

15 July, 2008: Naturalization oath ceremony!

16 July, 2008: Registered to vote and applied for US passport

26 July, 2008: US Passport arrived.

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Filed: Timeline
A minor clarification. If you're a US Citizen parent who has lived in the US for the required time (I think it's five years, at least two of which were after the age of 14), then your child IS a citizen automatically at the time of birth by the action of the law, and there's nothing you can do or fail to do which will change that. It's as though he was born inside the USA. See INA 301(g).

What your child lacks isn't US citizenship, it's documentation of his US citizenship. For that, file a CRBA, and/or apply for a passport.

Your US citizen child technically violated the law when he traveled to the US without a US passport. Don't worry, though, there's no punishment prescribed in the law, and I've never heard of it being an issue. Just get him a passport before his next trip.

I lived in the US till I was about 27, I still pay (quite a bit, might I add) taxes to the US even though my residency is in Europe.. so those requirements should not be a problem. I assumed because he had a passport from the EU going to the US before deciding if we wanted to get him US citizenship wouldn't be violating anything since we had no intentions of moving back (and we still may not be depedning on how messy DCF would be for my husband).. .. I guess that's where I got confused.

Edited by tokori

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Filed: Other Country: China
Timeline
A minor clarification. If you're a US Citizen parent who has lived in the US for the required time (I think it's five years, at least two of which were after the age of 14), then your child IS a citizen automatically at the time of birth by the action of the law, and there's nothing you can do or fail to do which will change that. It's as though he was born inside the USA. See INA 301(g).

What your child lacks isn't US citizenship, it's documentation of his US citizenship. For that, file a CRBA, and/or apply for a passport.

Your US citizen child technically violated the law when he traveled to the US without a US passport. Don't worry, though, there's no punishment prescribed in the law, and I've never heard of it being an issue. Just get him a passport before his next trip.

No violation of law at all. The child is NOT yet a US Citizen and need not ever be. He just potentially is entitled to US Citizenship. Either way, with the current intention, file the CRBA.


Facts are cheap...knowing how to use them is precious...
Understanding the big picture is priceless. Anonymous

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A Warning to Green Card Holders About Voting

http://www.visajourney.com/forums/topic/606646-a-warning-to-green-card-holders-about-voting/

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Iran
Timeline

Very simple to do file a report of birth abroad with the embassy in germany. I forget what they require I know a copy of the EU birth certificate. After you get the report, it is sort of like a birth certificate stating the child is a US citizen, you apply for a US passport.

My understanding, since one of my daughters was born in Europe is they will have dual citizenship until they reach 18 at which time they have to pick one or the other. Might want to check that to be sure.

Not a big deal just some paperwork to do.

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Filed: Timeline

As the others said, apply for the passport and the CRBA. For that, you will have to show proof that you've lived in the US for at least 5 years, 2 of which after the age of 14. For this, I used my university transcripts.

Here's the list of documents from the DoS:

(1) an official record of the child’s foreign birth;

(2) evidence of the parent(s)’ U.S. citizenship (e.g., a certified birth certificate, current U.S.

passport, or Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship);

(3) evidence of the parents’ marriage, if applicable; and

(4) affidavits of parent(s)’ residence and physical presence in the United States.

I think we needed a translation of the birth certificate, but we asked for a normalized birth certificate at my daughters' births, so we didn't need to do that (I live in France).

We also needed 2 US passport photos. You'll have to ask your consular office where you can get those done in your home country.

It all went very smoothly and we had the passports within a month of sending off the application.

Edited by americannes

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Moldova
Timeline
A minor clarification. If you're a US Citizen parent who has lived in the US for the required time (I think it's five years, at least two of which were after the age of 14), then your child IS a citizen automatically at the time of birth by the action of the law, and there's nothing you can do or fail to do which will change that. It's as though he was born inside the USA. See INA 301(g).

What your child lacks isn't US citizenship, it's documentation of his US citizenship. For that, file a CRBA, and/or apply for a passport.

Your US citizen child technically violated the law when he traveled to the US without a US passport. Don't worry, though, there's no punishment prescribed in the law, and I've never heard of it being an issue. Just get him a passport before his next trip.

No violation of law at all. The child is NOT yet a US Citizen and need not ever be. He just potentially is entitled to US Citizenship. Either way, with the current intention, file the CRBA.

No, that's not right. A child born in the circumstances described IS a US citizen. No application is necessary. He is entitled to proof that he is a citizen.

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A minor clarification. If you're a US Citizen parent who has lived in the US for the required time (I think it's five years, at least two of which were after the age of 14), then your child IS a citizen automatically at the time of birth by the action of the law, and there's nothing you can do or fail to do which will change that. It's as though he was born inside the USA. See INA 301(g).

What your child lacks isn't US citizenship, it's documentation of his US citizenship. For that, file a CRBA, and/or apply for a passport.

Your US citizen child technically violated the law when he traveled to the US without a US passport. Don't worry, though, there's no punishment prescribed in the law, and I've never heard of it being an issue. Just get him a passport before his next trip.

No violation of law at all. The child is NOT yet a US Citizen and need not ever be. He just potentially is entitled to US Citizenship. Either way, with the current intention, file the CRBA.

No, that's not right. A child born in the circumstances described IS a US citizen. No application is necessary. He is entitled to proof that he is a citizen.

Correct. INA 301 says the child born under those circumstances IS a US citizen, not that he's potentially entitled to become one. According to INA 301, a child born abroad under INA 301(g) circumstances is treated the same as one born under INA 301(a) circumstances (that is, born inside the United States). In either case, the child doesn't become a citizen when he gets a passport, certified copy of birth certificate, CRBA, certificate of citizenship, or other document. The child becomes a citizen at the moment of birth. The document happens later, and helps to demonstrate the citizenship that existed since birth.


04 Apr, 2004: Got married

05 Apr, 2004: I-130 Sent to CSC

13 Apr, 2004: I-130 NOA 1

19 Apr, 2004: I-129F Sent to MSC

29 Apr, 2004: I-129F NOA 1

13 Aug, 2004: I-130 Approved by CSC

28 Dec, 2004: I-130 Case Complete at NVC

18 Jan, 2005: Got the visa approved in Caracas

22 Jan, 2005: Flew home together! CCS->MIA->SFO

25 May, 2005: I-129F finally approved! We won't pursue it.

8 June, 2006: Our baby girl is born!

24 Oct, 2006: Window for filing I-751 opens

25 Oct, 2006: I-751 mailed to CSC

18 Nov, 2006: I-751 NOA1 received from CSC

30 Nov, 2006: I-751 Biometrics taken

05 Apr, 2007: I-751 approved, card production ordered

23 Jan, 2008: N-400 sent to CSC via certified mail

19 Feb, 2008: N-400 Biometrics taken

27 Mar, 2008: Naturalization interview notice received (NOA2 for N-400)

30 May, 2008: Naturalization interview, passed the test!

17 June, 2008: Naturalization oath notice mailed

15 July, 2008: Naturalization oath ceremony!

16 July, 2008: Registered to vote and applied for US passport

26 July, 2008: US Passport arrived.

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Filed: Other Timeline

I'd absolutely LOVE to learn how a US citizen and a German citizen could pull of to have an Austrian citizen child.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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