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Bringing family over and timeline

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I'm posting this in excitement and nervousness.  I honestly didn't think I'd be doing anymore paperwork and I didn't think my family would be open to moving here... but they are!  I've gone through the last handful of years working through the guilt of 'leaving my family behind' because it wasn't ever the plans for them to move... and now that I am naturalized, things are changing and I can't help but have a bit of excitement and hope. 

 

My family is from Canada (all Canadian Citizens).  I have become a naturalized citizen and the topic came up for my husband and I to think about possibly immigrating my family over if they were open to it.  It was always a thought that my parents would maybe retire here one day (they are younger, 58) and my brother may be interested in coming here for school (he is mid 20's, has a Bachelors of Science degree from UBC (+ certifications) and is a trained physical therapist.  He has strong grades and has wanted to potentially return to school). 

 

I'm reading some of the threads that some parents are being approved rather quickly.  However, siblings are a completely different story.  Ideally, if my brother were to come over, he would want to work.  But if the sibling visa is taking 15+ years, then he'd be 40 by the time it gets approved and going back to school at 40 is going to be much more challenging.  He is currently single and has a lot more flexibility now. 

 

My parents are set to retire early in Canada.  They mentioned probably within the next 1-2 years.  I'm not sure when I should sponsor them.  We thought about them being snowbirds and doing what a few of their friends do in FL and AZ (they live there 4-6 months out of the year, sporadically).  But we thought about when they got a lot older and how that would affect my brother and I.  My brother has plans to potentially also move to the East Coast, if coming down south isn't a plan and I don't want my parents to be stuck in Vancouver on their own (as there won't be anyone to take care of them).  My parents mentioned that since they're still young, they could move and work PT.  We've already looked into the insurance costs etc... and we know it's going to be pricier but hopefully if we can set them up here sooner, when they age during their senior years, we'd have the time to set up a system here. 

 

Just looking for guidance and experience from others if you've been through it and what you've decided to do.  Thank you! 

 

 

 


AOS

2014

July 05 - AOS package sent

July 14 - NOA 1

July 25 - Biometrics Appointment Letter

July 28 - Walk in Biometrics successful

Aug 27 - Request for Expedite on EAD (Job Offer)

Sept 12 - EAD approved and in production

Sept 12 - AP is approved but USCIS status is in 'Post Decision Activity'

Sept 18 - EAD marked as mailed

2015

April 09 - Interview - Delayed due to sealed package from civil surgeon not at local office

May 07 - GC in production

May 18 - GC in hand!!!

2017

Feb 9 - ROC 

Feb 14 - Check Cashed

Feb 16 - NOA 1

Feb 25 - Received Biometrics Appointment

2018

April 10 - N400 Application

April 29 - Biometrics

January 29 - Combo Interview / Recommendation for Approval 

February 20 - Oath Ceremony - NATURALIZED 

 

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hi

 

you can file for your parents whenever they decide to move here permanently, it can take up to 1 year to come

 

your brother is a different story, if you fie for him, it will take over 14 years, if your parents file for him after they come here it will take 7 or more years but until they come think around 10 years the least and he must remain single until he enters the US. you can still file for him just in case anything happens, and if he marries, he can bring his wife and minor children with him.

 

he has time to study any career in Canada and come here with education and experience, since any type of petition will take a long time.

 

 

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Retiree health care is a big issue. Your parents will not longer be eligible to use the Canadian health system, so they need to understand they will both need to work 10 years full-time to have full Social Security and free Medicare. If they apply to immigrate at 58, and complete process by age 59, they will need to get work pronto and therefore work until age 69 or 70.

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7 hours ago, aleful said:

hi

 

you can file for your parents whenever they decide to move here permanently, it can take up to 1 year to come

 

your brother is a different story, if you fie for him, it will take over 14 years, if your parents file for him after they come here it will take 7 or more years but until they come think around 10 years the least and he must remain single until he enters the US. you can still file for him just in case anything happens, and if he marries, he can bring his wife and minor children with him.

 

he has time to study any career in Canada and come here with education and experience, since any type of petition will take a long time.

 

 

I agree, and he's okay with that.  We are talking and if he decides to go back to school, he'll do it in Canada.  We understand for sibling process it's going to take a longggg time for him.  For my parents, it's a bit different. 

 

5 hours ago, databit said:

Retiree health care is a big issue. Your parents will not longer be eligible to use the Canadian health system, so they need to understand they will both need to work 10 years full-time to have full Social Security and free Medicare. If they apply to immigrate at 58, and complete process by age 59, they will need to get work pronto and therefore work until age 69 or 70.

My mom would be the one officially retiring as she's worked in corporate her entire career.  My dad is self employed and could transition over here if he wanted to and my mom could help him.  I'm also self-employed and what my dad does in Canada is similar to what I do over here.  We also own property in Vancouver and are prepared to pay a bit more in taxes, but it is an income stream for them.  So although they may not be getting as much, they will be getting some. 

 

We have looked into our insurance and it looks like for my husband (as I'm self employed) they can be considered a dependent.  Our kids, myself, and parents can be dependents and all we do is pay their premiums.  Though we do have an idea of the costs of premiums if we were to purchase it somewhere else (somehow they are unable to get onto our insurance), we are lucky to have fairly good insurance coverage and it looks like their premiums would be manageable ($400/month or so per person).  My parents will be receiving an 'income' so they would be considered self employed from their investments when they move here... would that be considered working FT?  Especially if they pay their taxes and into medicare?  I'll have to get more details on that one. 

 

I have come to terms that it will be pricy either way.  There's only my brother and I and he's quite a bit younger than I am.  For the last several years while I've been state-side, he's really taken over caring for our parents and being "that one person" to rely on to help them with things. He is very much in the beginning stages of building out his life, career etc.  He needs to not worry about our parents and get to roam freely like I did.  If something were to happen to my parents, a lot of the responsibility would fall on me because we'd be the only ones who can afford to help.  The choice is either they immigrate over here, although expensive, at least they will be where I am and I can take care of them when the time comes and they need it.  They are in good shape and are healthy for their age, so I feel like we'd have a bit of time to get them settled.  Or my fear is for them to be in Canada by themselves (as my brothers career could take him anywhere, really) and if something were to happen, that yes their medical would be covered but extended things like full-time care either an assistant or even nurse (in a facility or in home), cost of me having to be there long-term while having younger kids... that's also going to be an expense.  So, I've definitely come to terms that both situations are going to cost us either way but which is the better outcome?  

 

 

Edited by Lights

AOS

2014

July 05 - AOS package sent

July 14 - NOA 1

July 25 - Biometrics Appointment Letter

July 28 - Walk in Biometrics successful

Aug 27 - Request for Expedite on EAD (Job Offer)

Sept 12 - EAD approved and in production

Sept 12 - AP is approved but USCIS status is in 'Post Decision Activity'

Sept 18 - EAD marked as mailed

2015

April 09 - Interview - Delayed due to sealed package from civil surgeon not at local office

May 07 - GC in production

May 18 - GC in hand!!!

2017

Feb 9 - ROC 

Feb 14 - Check Cashed

Feb 16 - NOA 1

Feb 25 - Received Biometrics Appointment

2018

April 10 - N400 Application

April 29 - Biometrics

January 29 - Combo Interview / Recommendation for Approval 

February 20 - Oath Ceremony - NATURALIZED 

 

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As a dual American/Canadian citizen, and having lived in both countries for many years, also with many family members who have gone through what you are right now, my advice is for them to continue with Canada as their permanent residence and spend 7 months in Vancouver (summer), and the other 5 months near you in California.  That way they have the Canadian health care system to fall back on if something major happens, and then no need to worry about working full-time after retirement for ten years to qualify for Medicare.  And remember, health care in the US is much much more than simply the premiums paid every month.  If one of them needs major surgery, or even minor surgery, the out-of-pocket costs can be very high, even with the best insurance plans.  You may not have experienced this yet, but when you do it will be a big shock as to what insurance does not cover in the US.  Exchange rate is not great right now, so their Canadian pension payments will be worth much less here.  Tax implications become an issue if they become LPRs in the US, they will also have to pay taxes here and California as you know is very high.  I wish you all the best, but if my parents were thinking of doing something similar, I would recommend the snowbird lifestyle and get the best of both countries, SoCal winters and Summers in Vancouver, and maintain residency in Canada for 7 months a year.  Good luck!

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It looks like you are trying to game they system by planning to claim investment income as wages. Are they prepared to pay unemployment, workers comp, and the other taxes that might  apply in addition to the employer and employee FICA taxes. Then there are the issues of dealing with the secretary of state for the applicable state for annual filings if they are claiming to be a company.  If they plan to claim wages, let them get a real job. Full retirement age is currently 66. Others work far into their 70s and 80s.

 

We all want to know what insurance company allows parents to be covered as dependents.

 

I fully understand the desire/need to be close to aging relatives but this is not a problem that sneaks up on you. When you moved away from them, you knew that the distance would become an issue and now are whining about it.  You could , of course, move back there since you are likely a Canadian citizen as well.

 

 

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2 hours ago, CEE53147 said:

It looks like you are trying to game they system by planning to claim investment income as wages. Are they prepared to pay unemployment, workers comp, and the other taxes that might  apply in addition to the employer and employee FICA taxes. Then there are the issues of dealing with the secretary of state for the applicable state for annual filings if they are claiming to be a company.  If they plan to claim wages, let them get a real job. Full retirement age is currently 66. Others work far into their 70s and 80s.

 

We all want to know what insurance company allows parents to be covered as dependents.

 

I fully understand the desire/need to be close to aging relatives but this is not a problem that sneaks up on you. When you moved away from them, you knew that the distance would become an issue and now are whining about it.  You could , of course, move back there since you are likely a Canadian citizen as well.

 

 

Who’s whining?  I never complained that it’s expensive?  I actually said several times that I’m well aware of the costs. Also mentioned not knowing all the details if we had income from a rental property so had to find more out — hence stating that if that meant paying additional taxes then okay, we understand if thats the rules it’s the rules.  I just don’t have all the details and need to find out. 

 

My questions were about timeline... don’t think I ever complained about how difficult it may be financially or for insurance.  Even if insurance comes back and it’s doubled, i’m prepared that it won’t be cheap or easy.   Also mentioned being prepared for knowing when they age, even if they are in canada, those costs too.  Clearly planning for both sides.  I understand that this may not be an option for most but it is an option for me... i’m actually excited as i stated in my OP.


AOS

2014

July 05 - AOS package sent

July 14 - NOA 1

July 25 - Biometrics Appointment Letter

July 28 - Walk in Biometrics successful

Aug 27 - Request for Expedite on EAD (Job Offer)

Sept 12 - EAD approved and in production

Sept 12 - AP is approved but USCIS status is in 'Post Decision Activity'

Sept 18 - EAD marked as mailed

2015

April 09 - Interview - Delayed due to sealed package from civil surgeon not at local office

May 07 - GC in production

May 18 - GC in hand!!!

2017

Feb 9 - ROC 

Feb 14 - Check Cashed

Feb 16 - NOA 1

Feb 25 - Received Biometrics Appointment

2018

April 10 - N400 Application

April 29 - Biometrics

January 29 - Combo Interview / Recommendation for Approval 

February 20 - Oath Ceremony - NATURALIZED 

 

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