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scooby_doo

I'm new :) Have a lot of (simple) questions..

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Filed: Timeline

I moved to the US when I was 7, and became fluent in English before I was 8. I speak it with no accent, I sound and look American, I'm as fluent as a native. I spent a large portion of my childhood there, but my parents never applied for citizenship. :(

There was one instance where we weren't there legally. We'd been living there for around four years, and we left the country because my father's work visa expired. My dad talked to his lawyer, who said that it would have renewed itself or something by the time we entered the country, and that we were safe. He was wrong. We left the country a couple weeks after that, but he got the visa again like a week later and we came back legally. I still get pulled aside because of that, when I enter the country, though. They make me sit in that customs room, for around thirty minutes to an hour as they review the papers. They always let me go after that. Will it make it harder for me to get citizenship?

I'd like to become a citizen, I feel like it ought to be easier for me to become a citizen since I'm fluent and I partly grew up there, but knowing the system, it probably won't be.

I currently live in Iceland. My Icelandic is not very good, I consider English to be my primary language. My schoolwork has suffered due to not being able to speak Icelandic sufficiently, and I'd like to move to the US as soon as possible. Aren't colleges incredibly expensive, though? Is it hard to get a visa?

I've also heard that if you can't get a job after college, you'll get deported. Are there any "safe" majors I can take to ensure this doesn't happen? I know there's a shortage of nurses, but are there any professions related to psychology that there's a shortage of?

I already know a great deal about US history, having gone to a public school there. I also keep up to date on current events and have read a lot about the US in my spare time. I took a citizens test online and got 48/50 questions correct, so I don't think that will be a problem.

Thank you in advance to anyone who reads this, or responds to my questions/gives me tips. :)

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Filed: AOS (pnd) Country: Thailand
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I moved to the US when I was 7, and became fluent in English before I was 8. I speak it with no accent, I sound and look American, I'm as fluent as a native. I spent a large portion of my childhood there, but my parents never applied for citizenship. :(

Thank you in advance to anyone who reads this, or responds to my questions/gives me tips. :)

We are going to need some more information: How old are you now? Are your parents still legally in the US? How long have you lived outside the US?

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I moved to the US when I was 7, and became fluent in English before I was 8. I speak it with no accent, I sound and look American, I'm as fluent as a native. I spent a large portion of my childhood there, but my parents never applied for citizenship. sad.gif

There was one instance where we weren't there legally. We'd been living there for around four years, and we left the country because my father's work visa expired. My dad talked to his lawyer, who said that it would have renewed itself or something by the time we entered the country, and that we were safe. He was wrong. We left the country a couple weeks after that, but he got the visa again like a week later and we came back legally. I still get pulled aside because of that, when I enter the country, though. They make me sit in that customs room, for around thirty minutes to an hour as they review the papers. They always let me go after that. Will it make it harder for me to get citizenship?

I'd like to become a citizen, I feel like it ought to be easier for me to become a citizen since I'm fluent and I partly grew up there, but knowing the system, it probably won't be.

I currently live in Iceland. My Icelandic is not very good, I consider English to be my primary language. My schoolwork has suffered due to not being able to speak Icelandic sufficiently, and I'd like to move to the US as soon as possible. Aren't colleges incredibly expensive, though? Is it hard to get a visa?

I've also heard that if you can't get a job after college, you'll get deported. Are there any "safe" majors I can take to ensure this doesn't happen? I know there's a shortage of nurses, but are there any professions related to psychology that there's a shortage of?

I already know a great deal about US history, having gone to a public school there. I also keep up to date on current events and have read a lot about the US in my spare time. I took a citizens test online and got 48/50 questions correct, so I don't think that will be a problem.

Thank you in advance to anyone who reads this, or responds to my questions/gives me tips. smile.gif

From what you wrote, it seems your parents and you were on some type of visa but they did not have permanent residency. Provide more details so we can answer you better.

By the way, in order to apply for citizenship a person must've held US permanent residency (green card) either 5 years or 3 years (when married to a USC).


ROC 2009
Naturalization 2010

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: China
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Suggest you rethink 'coming to USA' - and instead - focus on the long term move to Australia or New Zealand.

Good Luck !


Sometimes my language usage seems confusing - please feel free to 'read it twice', just in case !
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Filed: Other Timeline

We need more facts and dates. How old are you? Do you have a US visa or a Green Card. What about your parents?


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Filed: Timeline

Well, I just read up on it and we had the H-1B visa, we weren't green card holders. We were there legally the whole time, but I suppose that won't help me in any way whatsoever. I live in Europe right now, and I'm 17-years-old.

From what I've read, immigrating is near impossible now. I really don't want to have to study in this country for at least six more years to get a degree advanced enough to MAYBE be one day eligible for the green card. I heard that if I go to school in the US, that I'll just be deported when I graduate, so that's pretty pointless since education is much more expensive in the US.

Is this impossible?

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: China
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Suggest you focus on Australia and New Zealand, make some international applications into the uni's there, forget about the USA for a bit.

Strongly suggest.


Sometimes my language usage seems confusing - please feel free to 'read it twice', just in case !
Ya know, you can find the answer to your question with the advanced search tool, when using a PC? Ditch the handphone, come back later on a PC, and try again.

-=-=-=-=-=R E A D ! ! !=-=-=-=-=-

Whoa Nelly ! Want NVC Info? see http://www.visajourney.com/wiki/index.php/NVC_Process

Congratulations on your approval ! We All Applaud your accomplishment with Most Wonderful Kissies !

 

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Filed: Timeline

Suggest you focus on Australia and New Zealand, make some international applications into the uni's there, forget about the USA for a bit.

Strongly suggest.

Why? You have absolutely no reason to tell me to do that. I was raised in the US and would like to move back, not just some random country I know absolutely nothing about.

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Hi scooby_doo !

What is your country of citizenship ? You know, depending on where you are from, the green card lottery might be your best bet, but I dont think you are old enough yet, you must generally have a high school degree in order to be qualified. An you did post that you are 17. On the other hand, you might have already graduated high school by the time they start the next session anyway.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
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Not really an expert on this subject, only way I know of coming here is through marriage, the lottery, or to be an eligible relative of a US citizen that can petition for you. When I married my wife, she had a son just over 21 years of age, unmarried, I could not petition for him. But my wife could after she became a LPR, but was advised to wait until she became a US citizen. Now from the time we started this, looks like it may take ten years to get him here.

Wife did work for Johnson & Johnson Co. in Venezuela, an international company, when her boss retired they pulled a guy that was working for years in Miami from Colombia to head the Latin American headquarters. He had kids that were essentially raised in America, but was on an H1B visa. His teenagers were not happy to be returned back to Colombia.

I have never heard of anyone getting LPR after coming here with a work visa. Know of kids that came here on a student visa, found a mate in college and got married to a US citizen and were petitioned for by their spouses. Colleges will break their backs to bring a kid here and do everything to get them a student visa. That is because they charge full tuition rates, but before they even start the process, want cash in advance for tuition.

But at the same time, immigration is really toughing up, was on the news last year about a couple that came here on a work visa with two kids, one and two years old. Their visa expired and stayed here. Somehow both these two kids managed to graduate from college, lived here all there lives, but were in the process of being deported, but never found out if they were or not. Kids certainly received a lot of sympathy, but sympathy doesn't count with the law. With my own step daughter, she had to show her green card before she could even enroll.

Seems like what really makes a difference as to whether you were born here or not, and doesn't make any sense to me when two illegals come here, have a baby, and that baby is automatically a US citizen.

It's a tough situation, also have a buddy that married a Canadian gal, been here for years, he never even heard about immigration, but they are having their share of problems now. Was like this country was asleep for years on immigration, and now trying to so something about it.

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Filed: Other Timeline

There is really no "viable" way for you to immigrate to the US. You are a minor without money, have no higher education, and, and that's the real dealbreaker, no status that would allow you to become a resident.

You might be able to get a student visa, if you can afford the $20,000 to $40,000 per year tuition and living expenses. After you got your degree, you'll have to leave the US again. however.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Filed: Lift. Cond. (apr) Country: India
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I'm sorry but your post just made me laugh. Just because you happened to live in the U.S. for a few years, speak fluent English and know about U.S. history, you seem to think you are entitled to U.S. citizenship? I lived in the U.S. for four years, speak flawless English and majored in History and Politics in a U.S. college -- one would think they should've given me a Green Card based on just those factors.

As has been stated, there is really no viable way for you to immigrate. Also, more information is required--where are your parents? Are they still in the U.S.?

You could look into a F-1 for college but that's not a walk in the park either. You will have to leave the U.S. after graduation unless you can find employment with a company who'd be willing to sponsor your H-1B.

I think it's something like 6 years on a H1 and then you can apply for LPR status based on a certain number of years of residency. I know 2 extended family members who did this. One came on a F-1 and then naturalized to USC (took him nearly 15 years) and the other one came on the H-1 and then got his GC last year.


03/27/2009: Engaged in Ithaca, New York.
08/17/2009: Wedding in Calcutta, India.
09/29/2009: I-130 NOA1
01/25/2010: I-130 NOA2
03/23/2010: Case completed.
05/12/2010: CR-1 interview at Mumbai, India.
05/20/2010: US Entry, Chicago.
03/01/2012: ROC NOA1.
03/26/2012: Biometrics completed.
12/07/2012: 10 year card production ordered.

09/25/2013: N-400 NOA1

10/16/2013: Biometrics completed

12/03/2013: Interview

12/20/2013: Oath ceremony

event.png

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Why? You have absolutely no reason to tell me to do that. I was raised in the US and would like to move back, not just some random country I know absolutely nothing about.

He's telling you that because you have no "right" to move back to the U.S. as with any other country...just because you spent a lot of time in the U.S., know about American culture, and speak English doesn't entitle one to U.S. citizenship. I know that's not easy to hear, but it is the truth.

Try checking out the non-family based forums--diversity, employment, and student/exchange visas.

Edited by Justine+David

Naturalization

9/9: Mailed N-400 package off

9/11: Arrived at Dallas, TX

9/17: NOA

9/19: Check cashed

9/23: Received NOA

10/7: Text from USCIS on status update: Biometrics in the mail

10/9: Received Biometrics letter

10/29: Biometrics

10/31: In-line

2/16: Text from USCIS that Baltimore has scheduled an interview...finally!!

2/24: Interview letter received

3/24: Naturalization interview

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

Looks like my wife petitioning for her unmarried son is working out to be a ten year process. And since he is unmarried without a wife and kids, equally impossible to get even a tourist vise for him so he can come up and visit.

Just saying even with a legitimate petitioner like a mom trying to bring a kid here is a very long term procedure, I couldn't petition for him because he just turned over 21 years of age.

He did manage to get an advanced degree, but due to our poor economy, can't even get a job here. The odds of being selected by the lottery are slightly better than the Power Ball, but not by much. His odds would be much greater if he was a displaced person from Iraq or now Afghanistan, DOS still has limits. Or coming here if he could work for an international corporation based in China on an H1B. Its all politics, but did slightly observe, both the DOS and USCIS doesn't give a damn about keeping families together.

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Filed: Timeline

Not really an expert on this subject, only way I know of coming here is through marriage, the lottery, or to be an eligible relative of a US citizen that can petition for you. When I married my wife, she had a son just over 21 years of age, unmarried, I could not petition for him. But my wife could after she became a LPR, but was advised to wait until she became a US citizen. Now from the time we started this, looks like it may take ten years to get him here.

Wife did work for Johnson & Johnson Co. in Venezuela, an international company, when her boss retired they pulled a guy that was working for years in Miami from Colombia to head the Latin American headquarters. He had kids that were essentially raised in America, but was on an H1B visa. His teenagers were not happy to be returned back to Colombia.

I have never heard of anyone getting LPR after coming here with a work visa. Know of kids that came here on a student visa, found a mate in college and got married to a US citizen and were petitioned for by their spouses. Colleges will break their backs to bring a kid here and do everything to get them a student visa. That is because they charge full tuition rates, but before they even start the process, want cash in advance for tuition.

But at the same time, immigration is really toughing up, was on the news last year about a couple that came here on a work visa with two kids, one and two years old. Their visa expired and stayed here. Somehow both these two kids managed to graduate from college, lived here all there lives, but were in the process of being deported, but never found out if they were or not. Kids certainly received a lot of sympathy, but sympathy doesn't count with the law. With my own step daughter, she had to show her green card before she could even enroll.

Seems like what really makes a difference as to whether you were born here or not, and doesn't make any sense to me when two illegals come here, have a baby, and that baby is automatically a US citizen.

It's a tough situation, also have a buddy that married a Canadian gal, been here for years, he never even heard about immigration, but they are having their share of problems now. Was like this country was asleep for years on immigration, and now trying to so something about it.

Yeah, I'm talking about situations like the one you mentioned. Children don't really choose where they move, but they're so adaptable that they find it easy to adjust to different cultures. When you live in a country that long, you don't have any ties with your native country, those college students were just as American as the other college graduates. I agree with the birth thing, it's a lot harder to stay in the US legally for years and years with a child, than to just give birth, and get automatic citizenship. A couple could have a child in the US, visit it maybe once or twice in the child's first 18 years of life, and the child will be a US citizen, and can move there when he wants to. Despite maybe speaking absolutely no English.

There is really no "viable" way for you to immigrate to the US. You are a minor without money, have no higher education, and, and that's the real dealbreaker, no status that would allow you to become a resident.

You might be able to get a student visa, if you can afford the $20,000 to $40,000 per year tuition and living expenses. After you got your degree, you'll have to leave the US again. however.

What?? I can't move right now????You mean my magical ###### unicorn lied??????

I'm sorry but your post just made me laugh. Just because you happened to live in the U.S. for a few years, speak fluent English and know about U.S. history, you seem to think you are entitled to U.S. citizenship? I lived in the U.S. for four years, speak flawless English and majored in History and Politics in a U.S. college -- one would think they should've given me a Green Card based on just those factors.

As has been stated, there is really no viable way for you to immigrate. Also, more information is required--where are your parents? Are they still in the U.S.?

You could look into a F-1 for college but that's not a walk in the park either. You will have to leave the U.S. after graduation unless you can find employment with a company who'd be willing to sponsor your H-1B.

I think it's something like 6 years on a H1 and then you can apply for LPR status based on a certain number of years of residency. I know 2 extended family members who did this. One came on a F-1 and then naturalized to USC (took him nearly 15 years) and the other one came on the H-1 and then got his GC last year.

Well you're ###### rude. I didn't leave in the US for a few years, I lived there for the majority of my childhood - big difference. As someone said before, giving birth in the US is a lot easier than actually bringing kids and raising them there legally for years and years. You obviously had an easy time moving to your native country after such a short amount of time, most others who are isolated for longer periods of time won't.

He's telling you that because you have no "right" to move back to the U.S. as with any other country...just because you spent a lot of time in the U.S., know about American culture, and speak English doesn't entitle one to U.S. citizenship. I know that's not easy to hear, but it is the truth.

Try checking out the non-family based forums--diversity, employment, and student/exchange visas.

Looks like my wife petitioning for her unmarried son is working out to be a ten year process. And since he is unmarried without a wife and kids, equally impossible to get even a tourist vise for him so he can come up and visit.

Just saying even with a legitimate petitioner like a mom trying to bring a kid here is a very long term procedure, I couldn't petition for him because he just turned over 21 years of age.

He did manage to get an advanced degree, but due to our poor economy, can't even get a job here. The odds of being selected by the lottery are slightly better than the Power Ball, but not by much. His odds would be much greater if he was a displaced person from Iraq or now Afghanistan, DOS still has limits. Or coming here if he could work for an international corporation based in China on an H1B. Its all politics, but did slightly observe, both the DOS and USCIS doesn't give a damn about keeping families together.

I'm sorry about that whole thing. I've noticed though, that illegal immigrants who have children born in the US are less likely to be deported. I also know of a family who moved to the US when their son was 2, and had a daughter a couple years later who was a US citizen. The son hadn't visited his "native" country since he was an infant, yet he wasn't a US citizen, but his sister was.

Not really an expert on this subject, only way I know of coming here is through marriage, the lottery, or to be an eligible relative of a US citizen that can petition for you. When I married my wife, she had a son just over 21 years of age, unmarried, I could not petition for him. But my wife could after she became a LPR, but was advised to wait until she became a US citizen. Now from the time we started this, looks like it may take ten years to get him here.

Wife did work for Johnson & Johnson Co. in Venezuela, an international company, when her boss retired they pulled a guy that was working for years in Miami from Colombia to head the Latin American headquarters. He had kids that were essentially raised in America, but was on an H1B visa. His teenagers were not happy to be returned back to Colombia.

I have never heard of anyone getting LPR after coming here with a work visa. Know of kids that came here on a student visa, found a mate in college and got married to a US citizen and were petitioned for by their spouses. Colleges will break their backs to bring a kid here and do everything to get them a student visa. That is because they charge full tuition rates, but before they even start the process, want cash in advance for tuition.

But at the same time, immigration is really toughing up, was on the news last year about a couple that came here on a work visa with two kids, one and two years old. Their visa expired and stayed here. Somehow both these two kids managed to graduate from college, lived here all there lives, but were in the process of being deported, but never found out if they were or not. Kids certainly received a lot of sympathy, but sympathy doesn't count with the law. With my own step daughter, she had to show her green card before she could even enroll.

Seems like what really makes a difference as to whether you were born here or not, and doesn't make any sense to me when two illegals come here, have a baby, and that baby is automatically a US citizen.

It's a tough situation, also have a buddy that married a Canadian gal, been here for years, he never even heard about immigration, but they are having their share of problems now. Was like this country was asleep for years on immigration, and now trying to so something about it.

Yeah, I'm talking about situations like the one you mentioned. Children don't really choose where they move, but they're so adaptable that they find it easy to adjust to different cultures. When you live in a country that long, you don't have any ties with your native country, those college students were just as American as the other college graduates. I agree with the birth thing, it's a lot harder to stay in the US legally for years and years with a child, than to just give birth, and get automatic citizenship. A couple could have a child in the US, visit it maybe once or twice in the child's first 18 years of life, and the child will be a US citizen, and can move there when he wants to. Despite maybe speaking absolutely no English.

There is really no "viable" way for you to immigrate to the US. You are a minor without money, have no higher education, and, and that's the real dealbreaker, no status that would allow you to become a resident.

You might be able to get a student visa, if you can afford the $20,000 to $40,000 per year tuition and living expenses. After you got your degree, you'll have to leave the US again. however.

What?? I can't move right now????You mean my magical ###### unicorn lied??????

I'm sorry but your post just made me laugh. Just because you happened to live in the U.S. for a few years, speak fluent English and know about U.S. history, you seem to think you are entitled to U.S. citizenship? I lived in the U.S. for four years, speak flawless English and majored in History and Politics in a U.S. college -- one would think they should've given me a Green Card based on just those factors.

As has been stated, there is really no viable way for you to immigrate. Also, more information is required--where are your parents? Are they still in the U.S.?

You could look into a F-1 for college but that's not a walk in the park either. You will have to leave the U.S. after graduation unless you can find employment with a company who'd be willing to sponsor your H-1B.

I think it's something like 6 years on a H1 and then you can apply for LPR status based on a certain number of years of residency. I know 2 extended family members who did this. One came on a F-1 and then naturalized to USC (took him nearly 15 years) and the other one came on the H-1 and then got his GC last year.

Well you're ###### rude. I didn't leave in the US for a few years, I lived there for the majority of my childhood - big difference. As someone said before, giving birth in the US is a lot easier than actually bringing kids and raising them there legally for years and years. You obviously had an easy time moving to your native country after such a short amount of time, most others who are isolated for longer periods of time won't.

He's telling you that because you have no "right" to move back to the U.S. as with any other country...just because you spent a lot of time in the U.S., know about American culture, and speak English doesn't entitle one to U.S. citizenship. I know that's not easy to hear, but it is the truth.

Try checking out the non-family based forums--diversity, employment, and student/exchange visas.

Looks like my wife petitioning for her unmarried son is working out to be a ten year process. And since he is unmarried without a wife and kids, equally impossible to get even a tourist vise for him so he can come up and visit.

Just saying even with a legitimate petitioner like a mom trying to bring a kid here is a very long term procedure, I couldn't petition for him because he just turned over 21 years of age.

He did manage to get an advanced degree, but due to our poor economy, can't even get a job here. The odds of being selected by the lottery are slightly better than the Power Ball, but not by much. His odds would be much greater if he was a displaced person from Iraq or now Afghanistan, DOS still has limits. Or coming here if he could work for an international corporation based in China on an H1B. Its all politics, but did slightly observe, both the DOS and USCIS doesn't give a damn about keeping families together.

I'm sorry about that whole thing. I've noticed though, that illegal immigrants who have children born in the US are less likely to be deported. I also know of a family who moved to the US when their son was 2, and had a daughter a couple years later who was a US citizen. The son hadn't visited his "native" country since he was an infant, yet he wasn't a US citizen, but his sister was.

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