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Kirsty

Becoming US citizen - can you keep British passport?

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Once you have been married to a US citizen for 3 years and get your citizenship, does this give you a US passport? And can I keep my original British passport?

Also, in the future when we have children in the US, they will obviously be US citizens but are they allowed one day to also be British citizens?

Thank you!

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Once you are married to the same US citizen for 3 years AND have 3 years (less 90 days) as a permanent resident you are allowed to apply for US citizenship. You don't get it until you pass an examination and interview. Once you pass and take the oath of US citizenship at a Citizenship ceremony you are then allowed to apply for a US passport. I will let someone who is familiar about the UK's position on dual citizenship answer your other question.

Edited by Kathryn41

“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

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Yup you can keep your British Citizenship, as I plan to myself as well :)


Naturalization N400 Timeline

06/07/09 - N400 sent in via Fedex Overnight

06/09/09 - N400 delivered and signed for

06/10/09 - NOA1 Notice Date

06/11/09 - Cheque Cashed

06/23/09 - Biometrics Letter Received

07/11/09 - Biometrics Appointment @ 8AM

08/21/09 - Yellow Letter Received

08/29/09 - Interview Letter Received

10/14/09 - Interview @ 9:40AM  

10/14/09 - Oath @ 2:00PM

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Once you have been married to a US citizen for 3 years and get your citizenship, does this give you a US passport? And can I keep my original British passport?

Also, in the future when we have children in the US, they will obviously be US citizens but are they allowed one day to also be British citizens?

Thank you!

After you submit the N-400 form, do the fingerprints, be interviewed by USCIS, and attend oath ceremony for Oath of Allegiance you become US Citizen and get passport.

After that you have both passports, you do not lose UK citizenship by becoming US Citizen.

http://www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/britishcitizenship/

P


Philadelphia

Sent N-400: 11/5/08

PD: 11/10/08

FP notice: 11/25/08

FP Date: 12/10/08

IL: 2/2/09

ID: 3/20/09 (Recommended for approval)

OL: 4/29/09

OD: 5/8/09 (re-scheduled from 4/10 and then 4/28) (Completed - Now a Citizen )

Passport applied: 5/12/09 (Philadelphia Passport Office)

Passport book received: 5/13/09 (Philadelphia Passport Office)

Passport card received: 6/8/09 (USPS)

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Unfortunately like most things it is not a simple black and white answer.

Note the key phrases on the UK site...

"You will not normally lose your British nationality if you become a citizen or national of another country."

"If you are becoming a citizen or national of a country that does not allow dual nationality, you may be required by that country to give up your British nationality"

The US does not RECOGNIZE dual nationality and does require you to renounce your loyalty to the UK as part of the oath. They don't go so far as to say they don't allow it but they do say they don't recognize it. I guess it all depends on why you want US citizenship. If it is to allow ease of travel between countries then I think there is no issue. If it is more complex, from either a legal or financial perspective, I would get advice before acting.

This page shows the US positioning on such matters.

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1753.html

There are some potential issues apropos tax matters that ARE impacted by the selection of US citizenship but regardless I suspect you can in fact at least claim dual nationality. Whether that claim would stand up if some major legal situation arose I wouldn't want to predict.

From the US perspective at least a lot hinges on whether the adoption of citizenship for the 'other country' was automatic (born there) or by choice (applied for citizenship). The UK seems to take a slightly different view insofar as this is concerned.

I do agree with prior posts that it shouldn't generally be an issue but like I say, if there are unusual circumstances or reasons for your question get advice.

Good luck,


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AOS posted 5/30/2007

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The issue is that while the US doesn't officially recognize dual citizenship, it has no rights to take away your citizenship in another country if that country does recognize dual citizenship. So, to US eyes, you are an American citizen. To British eyes, however, you are a citizen of both the UK and the US. It is the same with Canada - Canada recognizes having more than one citizenship and in order to no longer be a Canadian you actually have to officially denounce your citizenship on a specific form and file it with Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Saying the Oath of Allegiance to the US does not nullify Canadian citizenship and the verbal renunciation doesn't count. I suspect it is the same for the UK.

Edited by Kathryn41

“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

5892822976_477b1a77f7_z.jpg

Another Member of the VJ Fluffy Kitty Posse!

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As I indicated above I also suspect it to be the same BUT dependent on each person's circumstances would advise, again as indicated above, this be looked at as anything other than black and white.

It is too easy to assume that all will be well right up to the point when you have a 'situation' when an overlooked loophole hits you in the eyes.

To put it another way you are probably OK and if that is the level of assurance you are comfortable with then no need to look further. Otherwise if you consider this important (I did) get advice (I did) as there maybe ramifications not immediately obvious (there were for me).

Good luck...

Edited by wexford65

AOS Application

AOS posted 5/30/2007

AOS arrived in Chicago 6/1/2007

NOA1 rcvd 6/11/2007, dated 6/6/2007

AOS/EAD/AP touched 6/10/2007

AOS/EAD/AP touched 6/11/2007

Rcvd AOS/EAD Biometrics appt. letter 6/19/2007

I130/EAD/AP touched 6/24/2007

AOS/EAD Biometrics appt. 7/6/2007

AOS/EAD touched 7/6/2007

AOS/EAD touched 7/9/2007

AP touched 8/14/2007

AP touched 8/15/2007

AP touched 8/16/2007

EAD approved 8/20 EAD Approved

Rcvd AP in post 8/22/2007 AP Approved

AOS Interview 9/26/2007

AOS Approved 9/26/2007

I-751 Petition to Remove Conditions of Residence

I-751 mailed 07/06/09

I-751 arrived VSC 07/07/09

NOA1 dated 07/07/09

Biometrics 08/13/0

I-751 Approval 12/10/09 I-751 Approved

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I've got 1 more year to go before I can apply to become a USC.

I'm retired and I'm not bothered about voting....

I'll never commit a crime so I won't be deported on my GC... I

s there any great advantage to a UKC becoming a USC?


Old and Grumpy....But an American Citizen!!!

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One of the advantages for me is the ability to travel back and forth between USA and UK for exptended periods without putting my US permanent residency in jeopardy. At some point I would like for us to go and live back in the UK or Europe for a while but then I would also like the option to be able to return to the US without having to go through the immigration hoops again.


Annie UK

2004 Awaiting my divorce

Decree nisi 29th July YAYYYYYYYYYY

15th Dec DIVORCED AT LAST!!!!

Dec 23 decree arrives, I-129F sent to Nebraska!!!

Dec 27 NOA1

Feb 16 2005 NOA2 (51 days)

May 17 INTERVIEW 9am!!!! (day 141) Approved

May 30 Arrived POE Chicago (flight delayed!!)

June 13 applied for SSN

June 30 Wedding on beach at sunset awwwww

AOS 2005

July 11 Sent off AOS/AP/EAD to Chicago

Sep 1 I485 transferred to CSC

Sep 15 EAD and AP approved (59 days)

Nov 25 Green card and Welcome letter arrive in mail (no interview) 130 days

Removing Conditions 2007

Aug 15 I-751 sent to Nebraska

Sep 14 NOA1 rec'd, transferred to CSC again

Sep 21 rec'd bios appt for 9/28/07

Jan 26 2008 Approved. 10 Yr card received 1/28/08.

Naturalization 2008

Sep 8 N-400 sent to Nebraska

Sep 11 Priority date

Oct 7 Biometrics

July 10 2009 - Interview, approved!

Aug 20 Oath ceremony

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we should add that there must be a total of 18 months US residency during the 3 years after green card, and that trips outside the US for more than 6 months restart the clock on the 18 month requirement. so don't be gone more than half the time, and don't be gone more than 5.5 months at a time.


____________________________________________________________________________

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what it really means to you practically by "not recognizing" your British citizenship is that when you enter and leave the US you must use your US passport.

I think the only real problems with dual citizenship (where allowed) is for someone who may be a citizen of a country where National Service is required as the US government does not approve of its citizens serving in foreign armies


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I have a UK passport and an Australian passport.

I obtained my UK passport through parentage. My father was born in the UK and so I am eligible for UK citizenship. I got my passport before I was 18 (over 8 years ago) because at the time, that was how it had to be done... not so these days. I remember also, that at the time, getting it through your father was significantly easier than if it was your mother born there. I'm not saying that things will change between now and when you have children but that's my experience.

Also, I am sure that the US will NOT make me give up my citizenships. I've researched it extensively. I know for my case, it's not an issue, so I will probably apply for citizenship in the US when the time comes :)

Good luck :D

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