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snickers450

Bringing my father to US as an immigrant

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Hi everyone! I just wanted to get to some expert opinion on how to bring my father to the US as an immigrant. I pretty much understand all of the requirement except for;

 

  • Evidence of the father-son relationship
  • Evidence that an emotional or financial bond existed between you and your father before you were married or reached the age of 21, whichever came first.

 

What types of evidence do I need to provide along with a filled up I-130. I really do not have any pictures with my dad or any receipts (ie. western union, money gram) to show because it is very very rare that I will send money to my dad.

 

Please help guys! I have been away from my dad for a very long time and would like to start making good memories with him. And also for him to meet his grandchildren.

 

Thank you so much!

 

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Posted (edited)

I’m assuming you are a USC since you brought your wife here on a K-1. 

 

First you need the I-130 and read ALL of the instructions that accompany it. The questions you’ve asked here regarding money receipts suggest you haven’t read all of the instructions or you would know the answers. Read the instructions, then ask questions. 

 

Can you afford to do this? It’s not just about the required income level to satisfy the I-864 requirements but your father will need healthcare, a place to live, food, etc. is he of working age? Can he speak English? What are his qualifications (if he is planning to work here)? If he’s too old to work or cannot get a job here, it could cost you a four-figure sum each month to keep him here.

Edited by JFH

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for immediate response JFH! Yes, you are correct, I have not read the I-130 instructions yet. I just happened to google the requirements and prerequisites and instantly panicked and jumped into conclusion. Yes, I will do my due diligence to go over and understand the entire packet. I hope that I can still get your opinion and advise in the future. God bless you!

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Looks like you posted in the wrong forum.

 

Will he be working when he gets to the US. Common issue we see on here is that people do not think through the long term consequences of supporting a presumably older parent.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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~~moved to bringing family family of usc to the usa from family of lpr~~


You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.  - Dr. Seuss

 

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15 hours ago, snickers450 said:

Thanks for immediate response JFH! Yes, you are correct, I have not read the I-130 instructions yet. I just happened to google the requirements and prerequisites and instantly panicked and jumped into conclusion. Yes, I will do my due diligence to go over and understand the entire packet. I hope that I can still get your opinion and advise in the future. God bless you!

G. A father: Submit a copy of your birth certificate showing the names of both parents. Also submit a copy of your parents’ marriage certificate establishing that your father was married to your mother. If either your mother or father were previously married, submit copies of documents showing that each of the prior marriages was legally terminated

 

https://www.uscis.gov/system/files_force/files/form/i-130instr.pdf?download=1

 

As other mentioned, finance is definitely a concern. Languages, cultural differences, weather... will have a larger impact on older people than younger people (like us). We are more tuned to adopt into new circumstances than older people. Some are able to adjust, some simply don’t. I’ve seen this a lot personally. I have two grandparents (my mom’s Dad and my Dad’s mom) who came to the US as LPRs and each of them lasted less than a year. They both abandoned their GCs and returned home and both told me “I wanted to die on my homeland, and not at a strange place”.

 

My wife and I both sponsored our parents. My wife’s parents have been in the US for 6-7 years and are doing generally ok. My Mom just got here last year so it’s yet to know but she’s pretty determined to make it work.

 

Fortunately for us, all of them have done relatively ok financially so they’re not that dependent on us financially, just mostly languages and social interactions, going to the doctors and shopping, that sort of things.

 

It’s a lot more than just “bring him here”.

 

However, it is also very rewarding. There is nothing like looking at grandma/grandpa having a good time with the kiddos. Those are moments that will be priceless for yourself and your kids to have interactions like that with the grandparents. As you mentioned, to make good memories. It will be worth it. 

 

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