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I-130 Questions (citizenship, address history, native written language)

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Hello, I have some questions about form I-130. Hope to get some help!

 

Additional Information About You (Petitioner)

37. My citizenship was acquired through (Select only one box)

Birth in the United States

Naturalization 

Parents

 

My parents were born in the Philippines, immigrated to the US, became US citizens. I was born in the US, over a decade after they became US citizens. I selected Parents, but Birth in the United States seems like it could be another choice. Which is correct?

 

 

Address History

 

Current Address (also Mailing Address): Japan, August 2016 - Present

 

Vietnam, March 2014 - May 2016

<< There’s a 7 month gap here. Traveled throughout Asia for a few months, also went back home for a bit. I was in Vietnam from December 2013, but moved around different accommodations. It wasn’t until March 2014 that I actually had a work permit and a stable residence. >>

 

South Korea, September 2012 - August 2013

 

Question: My South Korea Address is past the “provide address for the last five years”, so I’m not including that in the Address History, or should I. However, there’s still that almost a half year gap before my Vietnam Address. Is that gap ok?

 

 

Part 4. Information About Beneficiary

If the beneficiary's native written language does not use Roman letters, type or print his or her name and foreign address in their native written language. 

 

I typed my wife’s name in Vietnamese (Vietnamese alphabet with accent marks), and I typed our foreign address in Japanese (kanji). Is that the correct thing to do? In other parts of the I-130 our foreign address in Japan is written in English.

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(I believe) Birth in the United States is the correct one for you. Parents would be if you were born abroad to a US citizen parent(s) or you got citizenship after one or both of your parents have been naturalized


Aug 2011 - Arrived on F1 visa

09/06/2015 Started exchanging messages

10/13/2015 We met in person

07/01/2017 We got engaged!

10/31/2017 We got married!

11/08/2017 AOS Package (I-130, I-485, I-765, I-131) sent via USPS - Chicago Lockbox

                      (Priority Mail - USPS autocorrected zipcode to 60680-4187)

11/12/2017 Package delivered (Delayed due to USPS mistakenly took it to 60624 and Veteran's Day) 

11/13/2017 Received Date (Priority Date)

11/21/2017 Received 4 e-mails & 4 text notifications (01:30 AM EST); checks cashed

11/28/2017 Received 4 NOA1 hard copies

12/09/2017 Received Biometrics Appointment Letter (for i-485 and i-765)

12/21/2017 Biometrics Appointment

01/08/2018 **I-765 and I-131 Approved** (61 days)

01/16/2018 %%Received combo card%% (tracking shows USCIS sent it on Jan 11 from MO, then Jan 15 USPS closed for MLK day) 

01/20/2018 Received approval letters for EAD and AP

09/20/2018 Received text 'Interview was scheduled' and interview notice will be mailed

09/27/2018 Received Interview notice by mail

10/25/2018 Interview day

 

 

Side note: I turned my maiden name into second middle name. In the combo card, my given name is First Firstmiddleinitial, however on the back of the card, they attempted to list my second middle name. 

 

My application package:

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, islanderfever said:

Part 4. Information About Beneficiary

If the beneficiary's native written language does not use Roman letters, type or print his or her name and foreign address in their native written language. 

 

I typed my wife’s name in Vietnamese (Vietnamese alphabet with accent marks), and I typed our foreign address in Japanese (kanji). Is that the correct thing to do? In other parts of the I-130 our foreign address in Japan is written in English.

IMO you can put "N/A" for Item Number 58.a. and leave Item Numbers 58.b. - 58.f. blank. The form is awfully* designed regarding this section; it assumes most beneficiaries physically reside in a country that uses his/her native written language.

*Awfully as in, it does not cover all scenarios.

Edited by TM92

Your Input Is Appreciated On This VJ Guide Proposal: 

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, islanderfever said:

Additional Information About You (Petitioner)

37. My citizenship was acquired through (Select only one box)

Birth in the United States

Naturalization 

Parents

 

My parents were born in the Philippines, immigrated to the US, became US citizens. I was born in the US, over a decade after they became US citizens. I selected Parents, but Birth in the United States seems like it could be another choice. Which is correct?

Like the other users have said "Birth in the US" is the correct answer. "Parents" would be applicable if you were born abroad and issued one of the following:

  • Children born before November 1, 1990, were issued a Certification of Birth Abroad (FS-545) if their parents registered the birth
  • Children born between November 1, 1990 and December 31, 2010 were issued a Certification of Report of Birth (DS-1350) if their parents registered the birth
  • Children born January 1, 2011 or later are issued a Consular Report of Birth Abroad (FS-240) if their parents register the birth

"Parents" is also applicable for LPR children who automatically become citizens when they fulfill the conditions of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

Edited by TM92

Your Input Is Appreciated On This VJ Guide Proposal: 

 

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4 hours ago, islanderfever said:

Hello, I have some questions about form I-130. Hope to get some help!

 

Additional Information About You (Petitioner)

37. My citizenship was acquired through (Select only one box)

Birth in the United States

Naturalization 

Parents

 

My parents were born in the Philippines, immigrated to the US, became US citizens. I was born in the US, over a decade after they became US citizens. I selected Parents, but Birth in the United States seems like it could be another choice. Which is correct?

 

 

Address History

 

Current Address (also Mailing Address): Japan, August 2016 - Present

 

Vietnam, March 2014 - May 2016

<< There’s a 7 month gap here. Traveled throughout Asia for a few months, also went back home for a bit. I was in Vietnam from December 2013, but moved around different accommodations. It wasn’t until March 2014 that I actually had a work permit and a stable residence. >>

 

South Korea, September 2012 - August 2013

 

Question: My South Korea Address is past the “provide address for the last five years”, so I’m not including that in the Address History, or should I. However, there’s still that almost a half year gap before my Vietnam Address. Is that gap ok?

 

 

Part 4. Information About Beneficiary

If the beneficiary's native written language does not use Roman letters, type or print his or her name and foreign address in their native written language. 

 

I typed my wife’s name in Vietnamese (Vietnamese alphabet with accent marks), and I typed our foreign address in Japanese (kanji). Is that the correct thing to do? In other parts of the I-130 our foreign address in Japan is written in English.

Fill the gap by indicating you were traveling without a residence.

 

All your time in South Korea appears to be more than five years ago, so not applicable or relevant.

 

If the beneficiary is currently living in Japan but is Vietnamese, yes, you handled the native alphabet section correctly.


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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, TM92 said:

Like the other users have said "Birth in the US" is the correct answer. "Parents" would be applicable if you were born abroad and issued one of the following:

  • Children born before November 1, 1990, were issued a Certification of Birth Abroad (FS-545) if their parents registered the birth
  • Children born between November 1, 1990 and December 31, 2010 were issued a Certification of Report of Birth (DS-1350) if their parents registered the birth
  • Children born January 1, 2011 or later are issued a Consular Report of Birth Abroad (FS-240) if their parents register the birth

"Parents" is also applicable for LPR children who automatically become citizens when they fulfill the conditions of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

Citizenship certificates or reports of birth abroad are not required to claim or prove US citizenship through US citizen parents.  US citizenship is automatic at birth if the time lived in the US requirement for the parent is satisfied (depends on the year of birth and the law applicable for the date of birth).  The certificates and records cited are useful as proof of US citizenship (since the foreign birth certificate is not), but they are not necessary.  A person of any age who became a US citizen at birth through a US citizen parent can apply for a US passport as proof of citizenship by submitting their parent's US birth certificate and their own foreign birth certificate.  I was born abroad and grew up outside the US, and only learned this policy as an adult when I was refused a student visa because I was a US citizen but didn't know it.  Whether or not my birth abroad was registered did not matter.

Edited by carmel34
*

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, carmel34 said:

Citizenship certificates or reports of birth abroad are not required...

True. I should have said "qualified for" instead of "issued"

Edited by TM92

Your Input Is Appreciated On This VJ Guide Proposal: 

 

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