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Shari

Any disadvantages in a UK citizen becoming a US citizen?

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:goofy: Good morning. I have not been on VJ for at least three years since my husband received his 10 year green card. Keith is from England and has been debating whether or not to get his US CItizenship because he does not want to renounce his UK citizenship. I know people have said you don't have to, but is there anything on any UK site that verifies this? He is a little worried to go through with it.

A couple reasons he would like to become a US citizien is that he has lived here for almost seven years now (married to me the whole time obviously) and plans to stay here, he has lost at least three job opportunities because he was not a US citizen (he used to have security clearance in the UK for his work), we would not have to reapply for his Permanent Resident card every 10 years, and if we wanted to go back to the UK for over 2 years, he could do it with a US Citizenship and not be restricted by time. Also, I am pretty sure if he becomes a US Citizen he is still guaranteed his full UK state pension (he has put in 30 years in the UK) and will qualify for benefits in 12 years, BUT if losing his UK state pension is questionable at all due to becoming a US citizen, he will not.

Keith still has two children (23 and 25) living in the UK and we may eventually go back to stay for an extended period of time, but we are not sure at this point as I (US-born citizen) would have to fill out paperwork over there in order to be able to stay any longer than six months) and I don't even know if it is allowed unless we plan to reside in the UK permanently which we would not.

Again, my main concern is, is there any written documentation from a UK government site stating that a UK citizen can have both US and a UK citizenship?

Thank you all very much!

P.S. Where does someone go to renew their UK passport? My husband's will expire in less than three years. :goofy:


K1 PROCESS:

04/08/05 . . . . Sent I-129F to TSC

08/31/05 . . . . London Interview - APPROVED

AOS PROCESS:

10/06/05 . . . . Sent AOS/EAD/AP to Chicago Lockbox

05/16/06 . . . . APPROVED.

REMOVING CONDITIONS PROCESS:

03/03/08 . . . . Sent I-751 packet to TSC.

02/27/09 . . . . APPROVED.

CITIZENSHIP PROCESS:

05/21/12 . . . . Sent N-400 packet to Dallas lockbox

09/11/12 . . . . Interview in Atlanta. Oath ceremony same day. Keith is a U.S. Citizen!

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2 general disadvantages that goes for all dual citizens are

1, keeping track of and maintaining 2 passports.

2, filing tax returns for the rest of your life to the IRS regardless of where you live in the world.

Not sure of anything specific to UK persons though.


-------------------------------------------- as1cE-a0g410010MjgybHN8MDA5Njk4c3xNYXJyaWVkIGZvcg.gif

Your I-129f was approved in 5 days from your NOA1 date.

Your interview took 67 days from your I-129F NOA1 date.

AOS was approved in 2 months and 8 days without interview.

ROC was approved in 3 months and 2 days without interview.

I am a Citizen of the United States of America. 04/16/13

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UK sort of acknowledges dual citizenship, US does not, as far as the US is concerned you are a US Citizen.

Not that citizenship has anything to do with pensions.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Both countries allow dual citizenship, though the US with some restrictions (like not allowing you to serve in another country's army, I'm guessing not an issue for your husband)

What Boiler mentioned effectively means you must leave and enter the US using your US passport.

He will not lose his UK pension.


tb.jpg

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:goofy: Thanks to all of you who replied. :goofy:

K1 PROCESS:

04/08/05 . . . . Sent I-129F to TSC

08/31/05 . . . . London Interview - APPROVED

AOS PROCESS:

10/06/05 . . . . Sent AOS/EAD/AP to Chicago Lockbox

05/16/06 . . . . APPROVED.

REMOVING CONDITIONS PROCESS:

03/03/08 . . . . Sent I-751 packet to TSC.

02/27/09 . . . . APPROVED.

CITIZENSHIP PROCESS:

05/21/12 . . . . Sent N-400 packet to Dallas lockbox

09/11/12 . . . . Interview in Atlanta. Oath ceremony same day. Keith is a U.S. Citizen!

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Just some online info for you:

US Dual Citizenship : http://travel.state....s/cis_1753.html

UK Dual Citizenship : http://www.ind.homeo...ualnationality/

Thanks. On the second link, it says:

"If you become a national of another country

You will not normally lose your British nationality if you become a citizen or national of another country."

The word "normally" is a little scary. That was just my first glance. I will read into more later. Thank you.


K1 PROCESS:

04/08/05 . . . . Sent I-129F to TSC

08/31/05 . . . . London Interview - APPROVED

AOS PROCESS:

10/06/05 . . . . Sent AOS/EAD/AP to Chicago Lockbox

05/16/06 . . . . APPROVED.

REMOVING CONDITIONS PROCESS:

03/03/08 . . . . Sent I-751 packet to TSC.

02/27/09 . . . . APPROVED.

CITIZENSHIP PROCESS:

05/21/12 . . . . Sent N-400 packet to Dallas lockbox

09/11/12 . . . . Interview in Atlanta. Oath ceremony same day. Keith is a U.S. Citizen!

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It is a big palaver to give it up.

It is a big palaver to give it up.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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:goofy: Good morning.

P.S. Where does someone go to renew their UK passport? My husband's will expire in less than three years. :goofy:

Oy vey. Your husband sounds an awful lot like my husband except my husband is just being stubborn because he has to say he renounces his Englishness at the Oath ceremony. I told him just not to say that part but he says it's the principle. uggggggggggh.

So annoying. Anyway, with all the research I have done in trying to persuade my hubby to spare us the pain in the assness of dealing with USCIS for the rest of our lives, has pointed to absolutely no disadvantage to them becoming US Citizens. I've tried everything. The only thing that remotely intersets him is having 2 passports like Jason Bourne. MEN!

If you find out what sticks with your hubby will you please share? I'm hoping maybe the birth of our son and being able to get back and forth to him without hindereance will be the sticker. We shall see!

p.s. he can renew his passport through the british embassy in washington d.c.. He can mail it up there.

Edited by DiZZyLoX

2010 K1 December Filers: December Filers Citizenship Help

---
Let's get this Citizenship party started:
Dec 28. 2011 - Sent AOS Forms
May 15. 2012 - Green Card in Hand
Jun 12. 2012 - Our 1st Baby was born! :)

Oct 14. 2014 - ROC approved.
---

08/16/2015 - Looking into Citizenship process!

Click Here for a detailed timeline of our K1 Journey.

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Thanks. On the second link, it says:

"If you become a national of another country

You will not normally lose your British nationality if you become a citizen or national of another country."

The word "normally" is a little scary. That was just my first glance. I will read into more later. Thank you.

The explanation that follows is really the only exceptions. Even if you become the citizen of a country which requires you to renounce your UK citizenship, as far as the UK is concerned you won't actually lose your citizenship until you go into a British Embassy and submit the citizenship renunciation form.

Only abnormal exception I can imagine is if you engage in treason or something...

With regard to state pension: http://dwp.gov.uk/international/benefits/state-pension/state-pension-arrangements-in-social/#usa

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Oy vey. Your husband sounds an awful lot like my husband except my husband is just being stubborn because he has to say he renounces his Englishness at the Oath ceremony. I told him just not to say that part but he says it's the principle. uggggggggggh.

My husband will be US citizen in less than 18 hours from now!! :dance:

(Can ya tell I'm so excited?? Even using that dorky dancing smilie. Hahahaha)


England.gifENGLAND ---

K-1 Timeline 4 months, 19 days 03-10-08 VSC to 7-29-08 Interview London

10-05-08 Married

AOS Timeline 5 months, 14 days 10-9-08 to 3-23-09 No interview

Removing Conditions Timeline 5 months, 20 days12-27-10 to 06-10-11 No interview

Citizenship Timeline 3 months, 26 days 12-31-11 Dallas to 4-26-12 Interview Houston

05-16-12 Oath ceremony

The journey from Fiancé to US citizenship:

4 years, 2 months, 6 days

243 pages of forms/documents submitted

No RFEs

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My husband will be US citizen in less than 18 hours from now!! :dance:

(Can ya tell I'm so excited?? Even using that dorky dancing smilie. Hahahaha)

Woo hoo!!! We need a smiley face that's popping a bottle of bubbly on here. :D

Edited by LeftCoastLady

Part One: The K-1 Visa Journey:

USCIS Receipt of I-129F: January 24, 2012 | Petition Approval: June 15, 2012 (No RFEs)
Interview: October 24, 2012 - Review | Visa Delivered: October 31, 2012



Part Two: Entry and Adjusting Status:

POE: November 18, 2012 (at SFO) - Review
Wedding: December 1, 2012 | Social Security: New cards received on December 7, 2012.
AOS Package (I-485/I-765/I-131) NOA1: February 19, 2013 | Biometrics Appt.: March 18, 2013
AP/EAD Approved: April 29, 2013 | Card Received: May 6, 2013 | AOS Interview Appt.: May 16, 2013 - Approved Review Card Received: May 24, 2013

Part Three: Removal of Conditions:

Coming Soon...

"When you're born you get a ticket to the freak show. When you're born in America, you get a front row seat." – George Carlin

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He may not want to draw his UK pension.

Because your husband is no spring chicken (like mine so this is not an insult), he won't ever contribute to the US Social Security system for 30 years. But he probably will work long enough in the US (40 quarters of work) to draw US Social Security.

A lot of British citizens have the idea that they will draw their US Social Security and their UK state pension. However, if they haven't worked 30 years in the US, they will be subject to the Totalization Agreement. So for every dollar his UK pension provides, his US Social Security payments will be reduced by 50 cents.

Sometimes the math works out in a person's favor - sometimes it does not.

UK state pension right now is around 104 pound sterling a week. Right now that's about $166, or roughly $719 per month. In this example, the Social Security check would be reduced by $359 (half of $719).


Our journey together on this earth has come to an end.

I will see you one day again, my love.

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My husband will be US citizen in less than 18 hours from now!! :dance:

(Can ya tell I'm so excited?? Even using that dorky dancing smilie. Hahahaha)

CONGRATULATIONS!!!


NOA1 : 02/15/12

NOA2 : 08/16/2012

NVC Rec'd : 08/27/2012

Medical : 09/14/2012

Interview : 10/31/2012

POE : 11/16/2012

Marriage : 02/02/2013

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He may not want to draw his UK pension.

Because your husband is no spring chicken (like mine so this is not an insult), he won't ever contribute to the US Social Security system for 30 years. But he probably will work long enough in the US (40 quarters of work) to draw US Social Security.

A lot of British citizens have the idea that they will draw their US Social Security and their UK state pension. However, if they haven't worked 30 years in the US, they will be subject to the Totalization Agreement. So for every dollar his UK pension provides, his US Social Security payments will be reduced by 50 cents.

Sometimes the math works out in a person's favor - sometimes it does not.

UK state pension right now is around 104 pound sterling a week. Right now that's about $166, or roughly $719 per month. In this example, the Social Security check would be reduced by $359 (half of $719).

I have never heard this before but needed to look it up. Iwent to the US Social Security site and found this (my questions are in the parentheses at the end of each paragraph):

A U.K. pension may affect your U.S. benefit

If you qualify for Social Security benefits from both the United States and the United Kingdom and didn't need the agreement to qualify for either benefit, the amount of your U.S. benefit may be reduced. This is a result of a provision in U.S. law that can affect the way your benefit is figured if you also receive a pension based on work that was not covered by U.S. Social Security. For more information, call our toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213, and get the publication, Windfall Elimination Provision (Publication No. 05-10045). If you are outside the United States, you may write to us at the address in "For more information" section.

If you work for anemployer who does not withhold Social Security taxes from your salary, such asa government agency or an employer in another country, the ­pension you getbased on that work may reduce your Social Security benefits. (When it says "an employerin another country", doesn't this mean if you are living in the U.S. nowand work for an employer in another country rather than if you lived and workedin the UK and qualified for UK pension?)

TheWindfall Elimination Provision affects how the amount of your retirement ordisability benefit is calculated if you receive a pension from work whereSocial Security taxes were not taken out of your pay. A modified formula isused to calculate your benefit amount, resulting in a lower Social Security ­benefitthan you otherwise would receive. (Again, sounds like it is if you lived the U.S. but received a workpension where SS taxes were not taken out. It does not sound like if you livedin the UK, worked in the UK, and qualified for UK pension you were have your USSS reduced).

TheWindfall Elimination Provision primarily affects you if you earned a pension inany job where you did not pay Social Security taxes and you also worked inother jobs long enough to qualify for a Social Security retirement or disabilitybenefit. (And my last comment: Again, it makes sense if you lived in the U.S. and earned a pensionthat did not take out SS taxes while living in the U.S.)

Edited by Shari

K1 PROCESS:

04/08/05 . . . . Sent I-129F to TSC

08/31/05 . . . . London Interview - APPROVED

AOS PROCESS:

10/06/05 . . . . Sent AOS/EAD/AP to Chicago Lockbox

05/16/06 . . . . APPROVED.

REMOVING CONDITIONS PROCESS:

03/03/08 . . . . Sent I-751 packet to TSC.

02/27/09 . . . . APPROVED.

CITIZENSHIP PROCESS:

05/21/12 . . . . Sent N-400 packet to Dallas lockbox

09/11/12 . . . . Interview in Atlanta. Oath ceremony same day. Keith is a U.S. Citizen!

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