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tokyo12

Locations to get green card stamp after interview

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Hello,

I am a US citizen and my wife was recently given a green card approval after an interview at the Embassy in Tokyo.

We were planning to fly to the US to get it activated and then return to Tokyo.

At the interview we said we would be flying the next week and the port of entry was Los Angeles.

Unfortunately we couldn't go as we have an infant child and needed to postpone for a bit.

Question i

1) can we fly to any other location to get it activated like Guam or Saipan as well or must it be at the continental US?

2) Do I need to notify anyone that we didn't go? I guess it doesn't really matter because the visa is valid for about 6 months or so?

Many thanks.

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**** Moving from General Immigration to Travelling during US Immigration forum *****

No need to notify anyone, the visa is (usually) valid for 6 months so as long as you travel before that, your wife is fine. Any Point of Entry can do the necessary. Keep in mind the greencard is for legal PERMANENT RESIDENTS, ie meant for your wife to live in the USA, so don;t stay outside too long.

I take it the baby has a US passport?

Edited by Penguin_ie

Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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**** Moving from General Immigration to Travelling during US Immigration forum *****

No need to notify anyone, the visa is (usually) valid for 6 months so as long as you travel before that, your wife is fine. Any Point of Entry can do the necessary. Keep in mind the greencard is for legal PERMANENT RESIDENTS, ie meant for your wife to live in the USA, so don;t stay outside too long.

I take it the baby has a US passport?

Many thanks, yes the baby has a US passport. So Guam and Saipan are both able to do the necessary?

BTW - as I have a job in Tokyo, we plan to continue living in Japan for a while. I guess we can go back and forth from the US - at least once a year, maybe twice if needed..

That should allow us to keep the green card and then eventually move back to the US .. right?

Many thanks.

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To "keep" a green card you must reside in the US. That is roughly inturpted as being inside the US for more days than you are out. People used to pop over to the US for a week or so every 6 months, but now that will get your card pulled. If you are not ready to live in the US it would be best to turn the card in and reapply when you are ready.


This will not be over quickly. You will not enjoy this.

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To "keep" a green card you must reside in the US. That is roughly inturpted as being inside the US for more days than you are out. People used to pop over to the US for a week or so every 6 months, but now that will get your card pulled. If you are not ready to live in the US it would be best to turn the card in and reapply when you are ready.

This is correct. You are walking a tight rope doing the visiting thing- you will probably get away with it for a year or so, at least if you have bills and a lease in the USA- ie proof that you officially reside there, and pay taxes as a resident. But it is very risky and everytime you enter, your wife will run the risk of her greencard being yanked. If you are not ready to move, and think you won't be within a year or so, the best option is to give the visa back and request a tourist visa instead, then re-apply for the spousal visa once you are ready to move and live in the USA.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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Many thanks, yes the baby has a US passport. So Guam and Saipan are both able to do the necessary?

BTW - as I have a job in Tokyo, we plan to continue living in Japan for a while. I guess we can go back and forth from the US - at least once a year, maybe twice if needed..

That should allow us to keep the green card and then eventually move back to the US .. right?

Many thanks.

Read this and this.


"The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps!" - Eleanor Roosevelt, First Lady of the United States, 1945.

"Retreat hell! We just got here!"

CAPT. LLOYD WILLIAMS, USMC

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Penguin is on top of this like usual. GC is designed for living in the USA, not abroad. Past the initial hurdles you are facing, if she want citizenship you cannot be out of the country nor than 180 day or 6 months in 3 years. Maybe turn it in and reapply later, if you continue to live and work out of country. Don't know about USC living and working out of country, her GC and any exceptions other than military.


In Arizona its hot hot hot.

http://www.uscis.gov/dateCalculator.html

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Your wife won't be able to just pop over to keep her GC status active,CBP computer systems are getting much more sophisticated in tracking those who are abusing their LPR status. More LPR's are being pulled into secondary inspection when they are now trying to re-enter the US on an abused GC status.

What others may have done before you may no longer be the excepted situations NOW. :bonk:

Edited by LIFE'SJOURNEY

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Your wife won't be able to just pop over to keep her GC status active,CBP computer systems are getting much more sophisticated in tracking those who are abusing their LPR status. More LPR's are being pulled into secondary inspection when they are now trying to re-enter the US on an abused GC status.

What others may have done before you may no longer be the excepted situations NOW. :bonk:

Well there has to be some way for us to do this without hassle because consider this situation - Me, the US citizen working overseas loses his job and has to return in a hurry. Our child is US citizen but spouse is not. So, then what would we do in that situation?

Bottom line is my employment overseas may last anywhere from 6 months to 2 or 3 years. I want to live in the safest fashion. i.e, no risk of anyone in the family being separated.

Of course I will have drivers licenses, bank accounts, all savings etc in the US. When she goes over, she can also get a drivers license and open a bank account, etc. But then we officially say look my husband is working overseas so we will not be permanently moving as yet.

That should work as long as we keep going to the US every few months, no?

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No, it won't.

For 6 months- yes, it will work. For 3 years- no, it will not. What you could do is have your wife apply for a re-entry permit, which allows her to be outside the USA for a maximum of 2 years. If she is granted it (good chance she will, but maybe not as you knew about your employment before coming to the USA), she can stay outside for 2 years, bu that stage hopefully you will have found a job in the USA.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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No, it won't.

For 6 months- yes, it will work. For 3 years- no, it will not. What you could do is have your wife apply for a re-entry permit, which allows her to be outside the USA for a maximum of 2 years. If she is granted it (good chance she will, but maybe not as you knew about your employment before coming to the USA), she can stay outside for 2 years, bu that stage hopefully you will have found a job in the USA.

So you're saying its better to get the re-entry permit? Was thinking of just initiating frequent travel. My parents, brother etc are all in the US, so we can get some basic things established there in the meantime (drivers licenses, bank accounts, etc ..)

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Did you'll file using DCF? If so, then you'll lied on your application, you'll are not trying to re-established residencey back in the US? All of these small inconsistencies will come to light. What will you do when your LPR has to ROC in two years?

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Did you'll file using DCF? If so, then you'll lied on your application, you'll are not trying to re-established residencey back in the US? All of these small inconsistencies will come to light. What will you do when your LPR has to ROC in two years?

Whats DCF? And ROC?

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DCF- direct consular filing, ie petitioning for the spousal visa directly with the embassy. To be allowed a spousal visa when the USC lives abroad, the petitioner needs to show/ agree to be domiciled in the USA before or at the same time the beneficiary spouse immigrates.

ROC= Removal of Conditions. If married less than two years when immigrating, your wife will get a 2 year conditional greencard. After two years of having that greencard, she needs to apply to Remove Conditions, and for that she needs to show residency in the USA.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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DCF- direct consular filing, ie petitioning for the spousal visa directly with the embassy. To be allowed a spousal visa when the USC lives abroad, the petitioner needs to show/ agree to be domiciled in the USA before or at the same time the beneficiary spouse immigrates.

ROC= Removal of Conditions. If married less than two years when immigrating, your wife will get a 2 year conditional greencard. After two years of having that greencard, she needs to apply to Remove Conditions, and for that she needs to show residency in the USA.

We don't have any conditions as we have been married 4 years.

I applied through the Visa Center in the US, overseas embassies don't accept applications anymore or so I thought.

We are beginning the process but can't move as yet - I don't have job there and we don't want the risk of not being together, if I lose the job overseas.

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