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Me&Her

OK, either I am blind or crazy, or else, but, is it 3 years?

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OK, we just file our RoC (I-751), but I already looking for information about becoming a citizen -- I am sorry, I simply can't stand that she needs her GC AND her passport every time we travel: Do you know how easy it is for anyone to lose the card?

So I stumble upon this information:

8.1)...When can I apply for United States citizenship?

A...As a spouse of a US Citizen, you can apply for citizenship 3 (three) years after approval of your Adjustment of Status. Your approval may be noted via any of the following: approval notice (I-797), on your passport (I-551 stamp and date), your green card ("resident since" date). The 3 year countdown begins with that date. This 3 year period does not include long absences from the United States.

Now, here me out here. She she got her two-year GC on May 1, 2010 (I am the USC, the GC expires on May 1, 2012, which is why we are doing I-751 to get her a 10-year GC now). Does this mean she is eligible to apply for citizenship 90 days before May 1, 2013, which is around February 1, 2013, which is less than a year away?

Or I am just making this up? Holy moly... What a day!

Edited by Me&Her

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its right! 3 years from being a LPR and married to a USC.

Edited by paojack

K1 visa
Filed I-129: Dec 3rd 2010
Interview: July 6th 2011 APPROVED!


AOS
Filed: Oct 4th 2011
AOS Interview: Feb 7th 2012 - RFE sad.png
AOS Approved: Feb 9th - without sending RFE
Green Card received: Feb 17th smile.png

ROC

Filed: Nov 13th 2013

Approved: March 13th 2014

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OK, we just file our RoC (I-751), but I already looking for information about becoming a citizen -- I am sorry, I simply can't stand that she needs her GC AND her passport every time we travel: Do you know how easy it is for anyone to lose the card?

So I stumble upon this information:

Now, here me out here. She she got her two-year GC on May 1, 2010 (I am the USC, the GC expires on May 1, 2012, which is why we are doing I-751 to get her a 10-year GC now). Does this mean she is eligible to apply for citizenship 90 days before May 1, 2013, which is around February 1, 2013, which is less than a year away?

Or I am just making this up? Holy moly... What a day!

What do they consider a long absence?

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What do they consider a long absence?

It's all in black and white in the M-476 manual plus they now have eligibility supplements in the N-400 site.

Yeah, took us almost a year to complete the AOS stage only to get a two year card, we applied exactly 90 days before the second anniversary of that conditional green card date for the I-751, but received a one year extension notice instead. Wife finally received her green card exactly 353 days after her conditional card expired. But just in time for her citizen interview to have it taken away again.

I was under the strange impression by her getting her US passport, we could travel together as an LPR needed to use a separate line and also stop those crazy trips to downtown Chicago to renew her foreign passport. Well we can stay in the same line together coming back, but with an agreement between our DOS and her home country, she still needs to maintain her foreign passport.

We were never asked to partake in that agreement.

If you have to wait as long as we did for that ten year card, when traveling, not only need your expired conditional card, but that original one year extension notice as well.

These laws according to my senator are made by the agencies and he has no say over them. And they are made for some good reason, even though if you talk to these agencies, can only telly you, it always has been that way. And you are not a citizen just like you were born here.

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You're quite correct. You only HAVE to hang onto that ten-year-greencard for 12 months if you're married to a US citizen. But having paid all that money to get it, there's no rush. It's good for a decade.


Karen - Melbourne, Australia/John - Florida, USA

- Proposal (20 August 2000) to marriage (19 December 2004) - 4 years, 3 months, 25 days (1,578 days)

STAGE 1 - Applying for K1 (15 September 2003) to K1 Approval (13 July 2004) - 9 months, 29 days (303 days)

STAGE 2A - Arriving in US (4 Nov 2004) to AOS Application (16 April 2005) - 5 months, 13 days (164 days)

STAGE 2B - Applying for AOS to GC Approval - 9 months, 4 days (279 days)

STAGE 3 - Lifting Conditions. Filing (19 Dec 2007) to Approval (December 11 2008)

STAGE 4 - CITIZENSHIP (filing under 5-year rule - residency start date on green card Jan 11th, 2006)

*N400 filed December 15, 2011

*Interview March 12, 2012

*Oath Ceremony March 23, 2012.

ALL DONE!!!!!!!!

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OK, we just file our RoC (I-751), but I already looking for information about becoming a citizen -- I am sorry, I simply can't stand that she needs her GC AND her passport every time we travel: Do you know how easy it is for anyone to lose the card?

So I stumble upon this information:

Now, here me out here. She she got her two-year GC on May 1, 2010 (I am the USC, the GC expires on May 1, 2012, which is why we are doing I-751 to get her a 10-year GC now). Does this mean she is eligible to apply for citizenship 90 days before May 1, 2013, which is around February 1, 2013, which is less than a year away?

Or I am just making this up? Holy moly... What a day!

Good to know thanks...

I must get started on the process also...

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You're quite correct. You only HAVE to hang onto that ten-year-greencard for 12 months if you're married to a US citizen. But having paid all that money to get it, there's no rush. It's good for a decade.

Second that! After spending all that money and effort, I'm not really in a rush to be a USC. :D Good luck to OP in RoC process!

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