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KEEPING THE U.S MILITARY SAFE

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Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Philippines
Timeline

Dear fellows,368985u61hahixuw.gif

Important Reminder to everyone please. To be 369286qzqm85uhnl.gif

Thank you.

-Shape335396t7jww6ozbs.gif

6209dk8nwjk6ra.gif6487zd1two06kg.gif

OPEC (Operational Security): Keeping the Military Safe

Source

OPSEC, also known as Operational Security, is the principle that we, as Army wives and Army family members, should all abide by when talking about our soldiers. If you’ve been on any military related message board on the internet, you have more than likely seen a warning to be sure to practice OPSEC. This means protecting the information you know about your soldier and his or her unit.

Generally, it means that you should not give out the following:

(1) Your soldier’s exact location overseas

(2) Any information on troop movements – this includes any movement while they are deployed and in transit to/from theater (including R&R). Do not ever give dates or times.

(3) Any information on weapons systems, how they train or numbers – for this reason, many pictures from overseas can easily violate OPSEC.

If your soldier is in a special operations unit, the OPSEC guidelines can be stricter. You may not be able to say he or she is deployed at all, much less where. His unit and/or FRG should provide the OPSEC guidelines for these situations.

Always abide by the rules set forth by his unit. Just because it is on the news does not mean that you can talk about the issue. By talking about it, you are only verifying the information.

CORRECT: "My soldier is deployed in support of Iraqi Freedom or Enduring Freedom."

INCORRECT: "My soldier is in XYZ Unit and is stationed at ABC Camp in XXX city in Iraq."

Give only general locations IF his unit allows it. The above incorrect statement is entirely too much information.

INCORRECT: "My soldier’s unit is returning from deployment and flying into XYZ Airport at 8pm next Thursday."

Never give dates or times for troop movements. Keep in mind that “next Thursday” is a date. This includes R&R dates as well as deployment and redeployment dates. Planes have been delayed for days or weeks because an excited family member made this information public.

INCORRECT: "Please pray for my soldier. He called today and told me he is going out on a very dangerous mission tonight. They will be gone for three days and I’m very worried about him."

When our soldiers are in dangerous situations, it is natural to want to reach out to others. But the above statement puts your soldier and his unit in danger. You could have very well just alerted the enemy about their mission.

It is important to realize that putting together the bits and pieces needed to create the larger picture can be amazingly simple on the internet. Many mistakenly believe that if they don’t talk about it all at once, the information is safe. This is wrong and dangerous to assume.

The internet is a wonderful tool, but in regards to our military, it is a very dangerous one as well. It takes only minutes of searching online to find enough pieces of information that could potentially endanger our soldiers.

DEPLOYMENT TICKERS

Many family members like to use deployment tickers to count down their soldier’s deployment. Never have a ticker that shows XX days until your soldier returns. If you must have a ticker, then have one with the amount of time he or she has been gone, although it is best to not have this type of ticker at all.

Finally, for your own personal safety, be very aware of what you are putting on the internet or saying in conversations in public. With the internet, it is not difficult to track down an address and phone number. Do not make yourself a target by letting the world know that your loved one is deployed.

PERSEC

PERSEC is also known as personal security. Like OPSEC, this involves guarding the information that you know. Do not give out your soldier’s name along with rank. This includes blacking out his or her name tape and rank in pictures. If he or she is in a special operations unit, you should also black out any unit affiliation.

Be vague on the internet about your personal information as an Army wife or Army family member. This is plain common sense in just every day life whether you have a family member in the military or not.

The old saying "loose lips sink ships" still holds true today. Keep your soldier, your family and his or her unit safe by keeping the information you know to yourself. You never know who is lurking and gathering information on message boards, myspace pages, and profiles. Better safe than sorry!

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If I may add one for the spouses:

If your SO is deployed, don't use those "Half my heart is in Iraq" car magnets and stickers. Those are a perfect "invitation" for pretadors...

If you want a sticker, use the "Support the troops" ones, they are less specific.

Edited by nane1104

Nadine & Kenneth

Our K-1 journey

02/06/2006 filed 129F

07/01/2007 recieved visa via "Deutsche Post"

08/27/2006 POE Dallas

->view my complete timeline

AOS, EAD and AP

12/6/2006 filed for AOS & EAD

1/05/2007 AOS transfered to California Service Center

2/26/2007 EAD recieved!

7/20/2007 filed for AP

8/20/2007 AP recieved

01/16/2008 letter to Congressman

03/20/2008 card production ordered---no interview!!!

03/24/2008 Welcome letter arrived

03/27/2008 my GREENCARD arrived!!!!!!!!!! YAY!!! No more USCIS for about two years!:-))

Removal of Conditions

02/02/2010 filed I-751

02/19/2010 check cashed

02/22/2010 NOA1

05/15/2010 touched

06/10/2010 online update:card production ordered

06/17/2010 approval letter in mail

07/01/20010 Greencard arrived

m_6d36288420d5938301b3093f21f99d98.gif

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Filed: AOS (pnd) Country: Canada
Timeline
If I may add one for the spouses:

If your SO is deployed, don't use those "Half my heart is in Iraq" car magnets and stickers. Those are a perfect "invitation" for pretadors...

If you want a sticker, use the "Support the troops" ones, they are less specific.

That is actually a really good point. The sentiment is so sweet but I've always thought it was giving too much information.

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Philippines
Timeline
Dear fellows,368985u61hahixuw.gif

Important Reminder to everyone please. To be 369286qzqm85uhnl.gif

Thank you.

-Shape335396t7jww6ozbs.gif

6209dk8nwjk6ra.gif6487zd1two06kg.gif

OPEC (Operational Security): Keeping the Military Safe

Source

OPSEC, also known as Operational Security, is the principle that we, as Army wives and Army family members, should all abide by when talking about our soldiers. If you’ve been on any military related message board on the internet, you have more than likely seen a warning to be sure to practice OPSEC. This means protecting the information you know about your soldier and his or her unit.

Generally, it means that you should not give out the following:

(1) Your soldier’s exact location overseas

(2) Any information on troop movements – this includes any movement while they are deployed and in transit to/from theater (including R&R). Do not ever give dates or times.

(3) Any information on weapons systems, how they train or numbers – for this reason, many pictures from overseas can easily violate OPSEC.

If your soldier is in a special operations unit, the OPSEC guidelines can be stricter. You may not be able to say he or she is deployed at all, much less where. His unit and/or FRG should provide the OPSEC guidelines for these situations.

Always abide by the rules set forth by his unit. Just because it is on the news does not mean that you can talk about the issue. By talking about it, you are only verifying the information.

CORRECT: "My soldier is deployed in support of Iraqi Freedom or Enduring Freedom."

INCORRECT: "My soldier is in XYZ Unit and is stationed at ABC Camp in XXX city in Iraq."

Give only general locations IF his unit allows it. The above incorrect statement is entirely too much information.

INCORRECT: "My soldier’s unit is returning from deployment and flying into XYZ Airport at 8pm next Thursday."

Never give dates or times for troop movements. Keep in mind that “next Thursday” is a date. This includes R&R dates as well as deployment and redeployment dates. Planes have been delayed for days or weeks because an excited family member made this information public.

INCORRECT: "Please pray for my soldier. He called today and told me he is going out on a very dangerous mission tonight. They will be gone for three days and I’m very worried about him."

When our soldiers are in dangerous situations, it is natural to want to reach out to others. But the above statement puts your soldier and his unit in danger. You could have very well just alerted the enemy about their mission.

It is important to realize that putting together the bits and pieces needed to create the larger picture can be amazingly simple on the internet. Many mistakenly believe that if they don’t talk about it all at once, the information is safe. This is wrong and dangerous to assume.

The internet is a wonderful tool, but in regards to our military, it is a very dangerous one as well. It takes only minutes of searching online to find enough pieces of information that could potentially endanger our soldiers.

DEPLOYMENT TICKERS

Many family members like to use deployment tickers to count down their soldier’s deployment. Never have a ticker that shows XX days until your soldier returns. If you must have a ticker, then have one with the amount of time he or she has been gone, although it is best to not have this type of ticker at all.

Finally, for your own personal safety, be very aware of what you are putting on the internet or saying in conversations in public. With the internet, it is not difficult to track down an address and phone number. Do not make yourself a target by letting the world know that your loved one is deployed.

PERSEC

PERSEC is also known as personal security. Like OPSEC, this involves guarding the information that you know. Do not give out your soldier’s name along with rank. This includes blacking out his or her name tape and rank in pictures. If he or she is in a special operations unit, you should also black out any unit affiliation.

Be vague on the internet about your personal information as an Army wife or Army family member. This is plain common sense in just every day life whether you have a family member in the military or not.

The old saying "loose lips sink ships" still holds true today. Keep your soldier, your family and his or her unit safe by keeping the information you know to yourself. You never know who is lurking and gathering information on message boards, myspace pages, and profiles. Better safe than sorry!

I agree in this topic. :thumbs:


10/xx/2006 - Met my Fiance in a dating website

12/xx/2006 - First Date in person

01/xx/2007 - 10 day visit of my BF & Official BF/GF relationship

02/xx/2007 - Applied for Tourist visa for Japan (Approved)

04/xx/2007 - Went to Japan to visit BF

08/xx/2007 & 09/xx/2007 - Another visit and decided to file K1 visa

11/xx/2007 - I129F sent to CSC

12/xx/2007 - Spent another long vacation here in Phil & He proposed to me

02/xx/2008 - Celebrate Valentine's together here

03/xx/2008 - NOA2 received thru email

03/xx/2008 - Confirmation letter recd thru mail

04/24/2008 - Medical Exam...PASSED

05/20/2008 - Interview Date (LORD, Please HELP us...Mama Mary, GUIDE us)

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Brazil
Timeline
If I may add one for the spouses:

If your SO is deployed, don't use those "Half my heart is in Iraq" car magnets and stickers. Those are a perfect "invitation" for pretadors...

If you want a sticker, use the "Support the troops" ones, they are less specific.

good point. and also if you have a publicly listed phone, avoid having the female's name only listed. use an initial instead. don't put names on mailboxes either.


* ~ * Charles * ~ *
 

I carry a gun because a cop is too heavy.

 

USE THE REPORT BUTTON INSTEAD OF MESSAGING A MODERATOR!

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If I may add one for the spouses:

If your SO is deployed, don't use those "Half my heart is in Iraq" car magnets and stickers. Those are a perfect "invitation" for pretadors...

If you want a sticker, use the "Support the troops" ones, they are less specific.

good point. and also if you have a publicly listed phone, avoid having the female's name only listed. use an initial instead. don't put names on mailboxes either.

And that's not only for the military families!!! :thumbs:


Nadine & Kenneth

Our K-1 journey

02/06/2006 filed 129F

07/01/2007 recieved visa via "Deutsche Post"

08/27/2006 POE Dallas

->view my complete timeline

AOS, EAD and AP

12/6/2006 filed for AOS & EAD

1/05/2007 AOS transfered to California Service Center

2/26/2007 EAD recieved!

7/20/2007 filed for AP

8/20/2007 AP recieved

01/16/2008 letter to Congressman

03/20/2008 card production ordered---no interview!!!

03/24/2008 Welcome letter arrived

03/27/2008 my GREENCARD arrived!!!!!!!!!! YAY!!! No more USCIS for about two years!:-))

Removal of Conditions

02/02/2010 filed I-751

02/19/2010 check cashed

02/22/2010 NOA1

05/15/2010 touched

06/10/2010 online update:card production ordered

06/17/2010 approval letter in mail

07/01/20010 Greencard arrived

m_6d36288420d5938301b3093f21f99d98.gif

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Brazil
Timeline
If I may add one for the spouses:

If your SO is deployed, don't use those "Half my heart is in Iraq" car magnets and stickers. Those are a perfect "invitation" for pretadors...

If you want a sticker, use the "Support the troops" ones, they are less specific.

good point. and also if you have a publicly listed phone, avoid having the female's name only listed. use an initial instead. don't put names on mailboxes either.

And that's not only for the military families!!! :thumbs:

i've also heard having a pair of large size muddy workboots (size 12+) on the front porch is a good idea too


* ~ * Charles * ~ *
 

I carry a gun because a cop is too heavy.

 

USE THE REPORT BUTTON INSTEAD OF MESSAGING A MODERATOR!

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If I may add one for the spouses:

If your SO is deployed, don't use those "Half my heart is in Iraq" car magnets and stickers. Those are a perfect "invitation" for pretadors...

If you want a sticker, use the "Support the troops" ones, they are less specific.

good point. and also if you have a publicly listed phone, avoid having the female's name only listed. use an initial instead. don't put names on mailboxes either.

And that's not only for the military families!!! :thumbs:

i've also heard having a pair of large size muddy workboots (size 12+) on the front porch is a good idea too

and if that doesn't keep someone away, have pepperspray handy...and the sound of a gun getting loaded, works wonders too.:innocent:


Nadine & Kenneth

Our K-1 journey

02/06/2006 filed 129F

07/01/2007 recieved visa via "Deutsche Post"

08/27/2006 POE Dallas

->view my complete timeline

AOS, EAD and AP

12/6/2006 filed for AOS & EAD

1/05/2007 AOS transfered to California Service Center

2/26/2007 EAD recieved!

7/20/2007 filed for AP

8/20/2007 AP recieved

01/16/2008 letter to Congressman

03/20/2008 card production ordered---no interview!!!

03/24/2008 Welcome letter arrived

03/27/2008 my GREENCARD arrived!!!!!!!!!! YAY!!! No more USCIS for about two years!:-))

Removal of Conditions

02/02/2010 filed I-751

02/19/2010 check cashed

02/22/2010 NOA1

05/15/2010 touched

06/10/2010 online update:card production ordered

06/17/2010 approval letter in mail

07/01/20010 Greencard arrived

m_6d36288420d5938301b3093f21f99d98.gif

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and get a small dog!

I know it sounds silly to hear 'small' dog.. but yeah, the big dog will be seen and they can easily shoot it or do something else to it.. the small dog will bark at very high pitched tones, will bark constantly and they will not see it coz it is in hiding....

I got this advice from my uncle who is a lawyer and, if I remember correctly, he had it from a criminal who he had to defend or something like that. Criminals really seem to hate small dogs and dont worry about bigger dogs.

Edited by JeroenAndMichelle

N400 Timeline:

12/14/11 - Sending out N400 package

12/19/11 - Received by USCIS

12/21/11 - NOA date

12/22/11 - Check cashed

12/27/11 - Received NOA

02/06/12 - Received yellow letter (pre-interview case file review)

03/13/12 - Placed in line for interview scheduling (3 yr anniversary)

03/17/12 - Received interview letter

04/17/12 - Interview - No decision, application under further review

04/17/12 - Biometrics

04/25/12 - Placed in line for oath scheduling (so I'm approved yay!)

04/27/12 - Received oath ceremony date

05/09/12 - Oath ceremony!!

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Filed: Country: Vietnam (no flag)
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and get a small dog!

I know it sounds silly to hear 'small' dog.. but yeah, the big dog will be seen and they can easily shoot it or do something else to it.. the small dog will bark at very high pitched tones, will bark constantly and they will not see it coz it is in hiding....

I got this advice from my uncle who is a lawyer and, if I remember correctly, he had it from a criminal who he had to defend or something like that. Criminals really seem to hate small dogs and dont worry about bigger dogs.

I would have to disagree. No offense. If you are getting a dog as a deterrent or for protection, there is only one breed to consider. German Shepard's. The don't bark alot, are loyal to a fault and will do some damage/protect you if you are in danger. There's a reason why cops and the military use them.

2653307-Travel_Picture-Our_German_shepherd_team_Irinhof.jpg

Edited by WideAwakeInTheUSA

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Brazil
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and get a small dog!

I know it sounds silly to hear 'small' dog.. but yeah, the big dog will be seen and they can easily shoot it or do something else to it.. the small dog will bark at very high pitched tones, will bark constantly and they will not see it coz it is in hiding....

I got this advice from my uncle who is a lawyer and, if I remember correctly, he had it from a criminal who he had to defend or something like that. Criminals really seem to hate small dogs and dont worry about bigger dogs.

with small dogs, the burglar can just step on them.


* ~ * Charles * ~ *
 

I carry a gun because a cop is too heavy.

 

USE THE REPORT BUTTON INSTEAD OF MESSAGING A MODERATOR!

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Filed: Timeline

Thankyou for this Shape. I've asked the guys who moderate this website to add this info at the top of all forums so that the new fiances and spouses are aware ..... yet to no avail.

Hello everyone, the addition of your information is brilliant .... muddy boots, check .... gun, check .... and big dog, check .... c'mon punk, make my day :bonk:

I can see the burgler looking down at small little me and seeing all this and still crapping his pants :lol:

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: China
Timeline
Dear fellows,368985u61hahixuw.gif

Important Reminder to everyone please. To be 369286qzqm85uhnl.gif

Thank you.

-Shape335396t7jww6ozbs.gif

6209dk8nwjk6ra.gif6487zd1two06kg.gif

OPEC (Operational Security): Keeping the Military Safe

Source

OPSEC, also known as Operational Security, is the principle that we, as Army wives and Army family members, should all abide by when talking about our soldiers. If you've been on any military related message board on the internet, you have more than likely seen a warning to be sure to practice OPSEC. This means protecting the information you know about your soldier and his or her unit.

Generally, it means that you should not give out the following:

(1) Your soldier's exact location overseas

(2) Any information on troop movements – this includes any movement while they are deployed and in transit to/from theater (including R&R). Do not ever give dates or times.

(3) Any information on weapons systems, how they train or numbers – for this reason, many pictures from overseas can easily violate OPSEC.

If your soldier is in a special operations unit, the OPSEC guidelines can be stricter. You may not be able to say he or she is deployed at all, much less where. His unit and/or FRG should provide the OPSEC guidelines for these situations.

Always abide by the rules set forth by his unit. Just because it is on the news does not mean that you can talk about the issue. By talking about it, you are only verifying the information.

CORRECT: "My soldier is deployed in support of Iraqi Freedom or Enduring Freedom."

INCORRECT: "My soldier is in XYZ Unit and is stationed at ABC Camp in XXX city in Iraq."

Give only general locations IF his unit allows it. The above incorrect statement is entirely too much information.

INCORRECT: "My soldier's unit is returning from deployment and flying into XYZ Airport at 8pm next Thursday."

Never give dates or times for troop movements. Keep in mind that "next Thursday" is a date. This includes R&R dates as well as deployment and redeployment dates. Planes have been delayed for days or weeks because an excited family member made this information public.

INCORRECT: "Please pray for my soldier. He called today and told me he is going out on a very dangerous mission tonight. They will be gone for three days and I'm very worried about him."

When our soldiers are in dangerous situations, it is natural to want to reach out to others. But the above statement puts your soldier and his unit in danger. You could have very well just alerted the enemy about their mission.

It is important to realize that putting together the bits and pieces needed to create the larger picture can be amazingly simple on the internet. Many mistakenly believe that if they don't talk about it all at once, the information is safe. This is wrong and dangerous to assume.

The internet is a wonderful tool, but in regards to our military, it is a very dangerous one as well. It takes only minutes of searching online to find enough pieces of information that could potentially endanger our soldiers.

DEPLOYMENT TICKERS

Many family members like to use deployment tickers to count down their soldier's deployment. Never have a ticker that shows XX days until your soldier returns. If you must have a ticker, then have one with the amount of time he or she has been gone, although it is best to not have this type of ticker at all.

Finally, for your own personal safety, be very aware of what you are putting on the internet or saying in conversations in public. With the internet, it is not difficult to track down an address and phone number. Do not make yourself a target by letting the world know that your loved one is deployed.

PERSEC

PERSEC is also known as personal security. Like OPSEC, this involves guarding the information that you know. Do not give out your soldier's name along with rank. This includes blacking out his or her name tape and rank in pictures. If he or she is in a special operations unit, you should also black out any unit affiliation.

Be vague on the internet about your personal information as an Army wife or Army family member. This is plain common sense in just every day life whether you have a family member in the military or not.

The old saying "loose lips sink ships" still holds true today. Keep your soldier, your family and his or her unit safe by keeping the information you know to yourself. You never know who is lurking and gathering information on message boards, myspace pages, and profiles. Better safe than sorry!

I agree with you on this completely... :thumbs:

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