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Girlfriend in Thai University and wants flexibility to come to US

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I am new to this forum, but would appreciate some realistic feedback on what is feasible to our unique situation.

My girlfriend in Thailand still has a few years left at University and wishes to graduate. She would like to visit before committing to the K-1 process and potential decision to Stop her education, which wouldn't even be recognized here in the US. I work full time and am alotted only 2-3 weeks per year to go see her and that is really not acceptible.

My question is, would a tourist visa make sense here to gain the flexibility we both desire?

The K-1 visa wouldn't give us this desire to come visit when she would have time? Would it?

If she were to come on a K-1, get married, and then return to her studies in Thailand (No AOS), what would be the visa or process for future visits? At least until she is ready to be here for awhile.

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What is your unique situation?

If she comes on a K1 you marry and she leaves without adjusting then you are looking at a CR1/IR1.

Have you met?


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Nope that is to immigrate, B2 is to visit.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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Sounds like a tourist visa, if issued, would be what you are currently looking for. Then when she is ready to move permanently, you would file either for the fiancé or the spousal visa.

However, many young Thai girls have been issued tourist visas and then forgot to return to Thailand. As a result, it has made it harder for all Thai girls to be issued a tourist visa.

How old is she? What ties, besides school which you say she intends to leave anyway, does she have to Thailand?

Good luck


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A B2 tourist visa would be the best, but it will be difficult for a young woman from that country to obtain. Still, her having a university course to go back to is a good tie to home, I think applying for a tourist visa is worth a try, and even if she gets denied, it won't affect a later K1 or CR-1.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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Her University may have a group tour that she could participate in ... where the group applies for the visa and interviews together.

she could have fun with her schoolmates first round through.. maybe you can signup for the same trip and tag along.

lots of students there travel and take tours stateside.. common enough.

Still, why wouldn't you just encourage her to take the TOEFL and transfer to a US institution if your ultimate goal is marriage and residency stateside?

Seems contradictory as so many there look to be "dipped in gold" and the return home with the foreign academic credential and if the goal is to stay, life will be easier with a stateside credential;

must be more to the story .

Edited by asisflyer

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Yes, she is 26 years of age and she has her own small business now, which she recently acquired with the help of her family whom are also small business owners. I imagine the successful small business helps towards a B2, but the short track record of it probably does not. Her family also put some property in her name and I am also willing to be a sponsor for her. Is it even possible and/or helpful to be a sponsor?

I'm aware of Thai nationals having difficulty in getting B2's, and that is why I was inquiring about various, if any options with K-1. Which does not seem to be the case.

Regards,

S

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She needs to qualify on her own, but being a business owner and enrolled in uni (esp if she already paid for next year), her chances of getting a tourist visa are better than most.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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I am new to this forum, but would appreciate some realistic feedback on what is feasible to our unique situation.

My girlfriend in Thailand still has a few years left at University and wishes to graduate. She would like to visit before committing to the K-1 process and potential decision to Stop her education, which wouldn't even be recognized here in the US. I work full time and am alotted only 2-3 weeks per year to go see her and that is really not acceptible.

My question is, would a tourist visa make sense here to gain the flexibility we both desire?

The K-1 visa wouldn't give us this desire to come visit when she would have time? Would it?

If she were to come on a K-1, get married, and then return to her studies in Thailand (No AOS), what would be the visa or process for future visits? At least until she is ready to be here for awhile.

She should be visiting to determine how she will continue her education here in the USA. If that was her primary reason she might have a chance at a B 2. If its about the B F she will not be granted a visa.

In the US she would be tested to determine her education level & placed in classes to accommodate her situation. At least that's what happened to me. She could come here at anytime to further her education. When her circumstances are correct she could apply for a Pell Grant to help pay for her education. This is the beauty of this country.

A K 1 is not used to visit. If she came on K 1, married, returned; you could file a C R 1 which would result in a visa in about 9 to 12 months.

Edited by Ning

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Pell grants are history with my last kid, not only this, but tuition, books, and housing has darn near tripled after 9/11, even talking about another 40% price increase if Walker cuts the budget to the Wisconsin University system. Daughter was on the high honor roll and received a $5,000 scholarship to study in the UK.

But from the time she received that award and wanted to see our latest tax returns, we earn a few hundred dollars more, they took it back. So we laid out $5,000 so she could go, and can only deduct a small portion of this off our taxes.

But sure easy to come here on a student visa, provided you can afford to pay out of state tuition in advance, universities will break their backs to get you that visa. Bu the day after the semester ends, want you on the plane.

My kids that did get pell grants are paying a huge sum of that back in income taxes, without a degree, can only find a minimum wage job, this is how this country has changed over the last few years.

Yeah, getting the B1/B2 visa is easy if you are super rich and sure have to prove ties with your home country. All you can do is try.

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