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Qian

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About Qian

  • Rank
    Member
  • Member # 272567
  • Location Singapore

Profile Information

  • City
    Miami
  • State
    Florida

Immigration Info

  • Immigration Status
    Naturalization (approved)
  • Place benefits filed at
    Lewisville TX Lockbox
  • Local Office
    Dallas TX
  • Country
    Singapore

Immigration Timeline & Photos

Recent Profile Visitors

1,180 profile views
  1. Love how you dig things really deep! It sure will pay off. Well, I don't have any evidence, but I have a feeling that the chance of having passed the interview then have to file ROC is slim. As how practical, sensible and considerate they had been when handling my case, I have a feeling that they will take a view on the whole situation to make a decision. If it's too close to ROC they might not proceed to the citizenship interview. Like klmnl2000 said, file as soon as you can, and deal with whatever comes afterwards.
  2. Hi there Thank you for reading! I can tell you have done plenty research, I think you ought to be able to do it without using attorneys. Re I-751, I have the same understanding as you do. You can't skip I-751 if the 90-day filing period starts, or you have a pending ROC already. But I have heard people in similar situation got a combo interview- N400&I-751. And you raise a very interesting point regarding how it's enforced. Honestly I personally, can't think of anything at the moment either, other than there might be something in the future that we can't see yet. Also, the whole point of 319B is to promote family reunion, maybe the consequences are more on a personal level- say if somebody decided not to follow their spouse to overseas, it will become a long distance relationship and that might be challenging. i.e. for tax reasons, the expat spouse cannot be in the States for more than 30 days a year. As you said, it's not practical to purchase a plane ticket to show your intention of departing the US. I believe at this point, all they need it's a statement from the applicant to state so.
  3. Hi there Thank you for appreciating the report! I believe you will have to file ROC within the 90 days window if your oath doesn't happen before the 90 days end. You need to have a valid GC to naturalize. The silver lining would be you might get a combo interview, as I have heard of similar case before. Hopefully, it won't take as long as being indicated. It took me less than 3 months. All the best!
  4. Hi Janiejane Happy to help. 1. If you mean Part 5. Information about your residence, A. current physical address would be your Germany address, and B. Current Mailing Address would be your mother-in-law's address (Assuming you used her address when applying for GC?) 2. You mail in your fingerprint cards along with your application from Germany. You attend interview and take Oath at the field office of your choice 3. I did mail all supporting documents in. You will be asked to bring the necessary originals to the interview. 4. Again if you used your mother-in-law' address for GC, that would be shown/considered as your US permanent address. Find the mail address on "where to send" on the N400 instruction. Incidentally, don't worry if the office is not where you want to be interviewed, they would route your file there. Good luck!
  5. Hi Rozmari, I didn't apply for the re-entry permit, because during the 10 months from obtaining the GC to naturalization I visited the States 3 or 4 times, never been away for too long to raise an eyebrow. So I guess, depending on how long you are going to be away from the States, you may or may not need the document. Good luck!!!!
  6. Your return ticket, your lease back home, insurance policy, pay slips, etc I'm a firm believer of that if you have everything and legit, you probably will not be asked for anything to prove.
  7. I visited 3 or 4 times between the submission and the approval of I-130. Never even was asked a question. But always make sure you have the appropriate paperwork or proof if was asked.
  8. Certainly, it’s a personal choice if the immigrant spouse joining the spouse employed overseas or not. However, if the immigrant spouse applies for citizenship under 319B, then “departing the US to join the spouse employed abroad within 45 days after naturalization” is one of the requirements. Military ( & spouse) applicants have a special hotline to call but not for other 319B applicants unfortunately. It’s getting more familiarized by USCIS and I think they do an excellent job handling these cases from my own and other applicants’ experiences that I know of. Good luck!
  9. Hi there It's an interesting question! Applicant needs to state their intention of residing with the USC spouse overseas and returning to the US upon competence of assignment, and to convince USCIS with relevant proof. (Enabling the immigrant spouse to live with the USC spouse overseas without losing GC is one of main purposes of 319B.) Work history is on the N400 and related questions would be asked at the interview. Letter from the employer should mention the immigrant spouse accompanying the employee to relocate overseas. If the applicant has the intention of going back to the States resuming their work after naturalization but states otherwise, it would be a lie to the government and to the company too. So to answer your question, No, the applicant is not supposed to come back to US and resume their job during spouse's foreign assignment. Also, if there's no concern of losing immigration status and it's okay to live separately during the assignment, why not just go with the 3 year rule. Hope it helps!
  10. Also, if these two are satisfied, the GC holder spouse maybe eligible for the expeditious naturalization under 319B right away - depending on the nature of the employment of course.
  11. I think the confusion comes from “ the time of filing” and “ the time of taking the oath”. This part below describe when one must have an approved ROC B. Spouses who Must Have an Approved Petition Prior to Naturalization In all cases, a CPR applying for naturalization on the basis of marriage must have an approved petition prior to naturalization if the CPR: Has a pending petition to remove conditions at the time of filing the Application for Naturalization; or Reaches the 90-day period to file the petition to remove conditions prior to taking the Oath of Allegiance. [5] Well, maybe just wait to see what they say.
  12. It’s in the USCIS policy manual Chapter 5 re 319B. Best of luck! https://www.uscis.gov/policy-manual/volume-12-part-g-chapter-5 Spouses who Must Have an Approved Petition Prior to Naturalization In all cases, a CPR applying for naturalization on the basis of marriage must have an approved petition prior to naturalization if the CPR: Has a pending petition to remove conditions at the time of filing the Application for Naturalization; or Reaches the 90-day period to file the petition to remove conditions prior to taking the Oath of Allegiance. [5]
  13. I think it's the best. Somehow I sense the photos and FD258 should always be in the same mail. I got the same RFE for FD 258, so I mailed the FD258 only, because I have sent photos originally and RFE didn't ask for photos. I ended up get RFE2 for photos. I guess biometrics are sent to a different location to get processed, if they are not together, no one is going to looking them for you from the package. Hope this time goes through!
  14. Two US passport sized photos, with name and A number written on the back. Maybe it was the photo actually are missing and triggered the generic RFE? Let me know how it goes, I'm curious. Thanks!
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