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Albatross

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About Albatross

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday February 9
  • Member # 155268
  • Location San Antonio, TX, USA

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • City
    San Antonio
  • State
    Texas

Immigration Info

  • Immigration Status
    K-1 Visa
  • Place benefits filed at
    California Service Center
  • Local Office
    San Antonio TX
  • Country
    Ukraine
  • Our Story
    2 "wrinkles" in this story. #1. RFE for 2 reasons: A. You gotta specifically ASK in a separate letter, for ANY kind of waiver, including for a "general waiver" if you have had 2 K-1 visa applications in the past. Don't think you can just check the block on the I-129f. Gotta write a separate letter! B. Just because a document does not exist, USCIS will not believe it until some other, equally stupid government agency tells them that the document does not exist. #2 Police Clearance MUST include ANY and EVERY surname she has ever had. Including her maiden name even if she got married early... and divorced...ANY name from childhood...

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  1. Jennywhite421: EVERYTHING changes in a heartbeat right now. First ticket was for March 17, FLIGHT CANCELLED. Then rebooked reservation to April 14. Meanwhile, the US Embassy Kyiv and Ukrainian Int'l Airlines organized a couple of flights to bring Americans home from Ukraine and Ukrainians home from the USA. We got her a ticket on that special flight...the airline didn't want to let her on, but a lady from the US Embassy told the airline to let her on, and they did... so she is now in Texas with me... The photo is of me in the uniform of a Soviet Air Force Colonel with her... a long story, but I walked in and bought it in the military exchange store in Leningrad in 1991... because I was good enough to get away with it...
  2. We got the visa, and had a ticket for Iryna to get to the USA... And I told her I thought that they would cancel her flight, but that she could get on the flight a day earlier... but she had things to do, didn't want to leave a day earlier... and then right after the flight left the day before her flight...THEY CANCELLED HER FLIGHT! Now we have a ticket for the middle of April...if nothing changes.... Visa is good until August in any case... I think they will let her fly to the USA before then.... at least I HOPE!
  3. Quote

    Regarding age difference.  USCIS could not care less about it.  My first Ukrainian wife was 23 years younger than me.  Married for 13 years, she passed away.  Second Ukrainian wife was 30 years younger.  She turned into a real gold digger.  Had to let her go, she's back in Ukraine with no Green Card.  Now  just got USCIS approval (NOA2) for my third Ukrainian.  Far more like my first one.  And 22 years younger.  I think up to about 22-23 years younger is ok.  Less might be better, but heck, I'm 70, and in as good a shape as most 55-60 year old guys.  But USCIS doesn't care.  I have a friend who married a Filipina when he was 80 and she was 20.  She's still with him at 26, and he's 86.  They each got what they wanted....  P.S. Almost HALF of all the K-1 visa's in a given year come from Manila... check it out!  Enormous age differences!

     

  4. Gonna ask this again, since nobody answered:   Anyone have any insight as to whether it takes longer to get the NOA2, if you have to ask for a "General Waiver" because you have filed I-129f's twice in the past?  First wife died after 13 years of marriage, second didn't work out, sent her back to Ukraine before the Permanent Green Card application, divorced, so she has NO US status, no Green Card, and is back to living in Ukraine as a Ukrainian. 

  5. Regarding citizens of the FSM, Palau, and RMI. In the 15 years I was on Guam, there were CONSTANTLY people from the FSM, especially Chuuk, once known as Truk, who were coming to Guam. Many of these people were criminals. Some of most horrific crime on Guam was committed by Chuukese. Often for no reason or with minimal aggravation. US Immigration made NO apparent attempts to keep these people out or deport them, either. Just a dose of reality, regardless of what any website says.
  6. No, not exactly true. Citizens of the Federated States of Micronesia, and Palau are GUARANTEED entry to the US. I lived on Guam for 15 years, and I am VERY familiar with this situation. I think Marshall Islanders have this privilege as well, but it was constantly discussed as part of the "Compact/Impact" guarantee that was granted when the FSM Palau and the Marshall Islands were granted independence from the US when they were no longer US Trust Territories. 100% sure.
  7. Got a question for the community here.  Anyone have any insight as to whether it takes longer to get the NOA2, if you have to ask for a "General Waiver" because you have filed I-129f's twice in the past?  First wife died after 13 years of marriage, second didn't work out, sent her back to Ukraine before the Permanent Green Card application, divorced, so she has NO US status, no Green Card, and is back to living in Ukraine as a Ukrainian. 

  8. An observation. When I looked today, most of the most recent, fastest, approvals were for citizens of the UK. Maybe if you are from a Visa Waiver country they grant Fiancé Visas more quickly. (?)
  9. VERY misleading. Citizens of Palau and Micronesia do NOT need a visa to travel to the USA. They are GUARANTEED entry due to what is called "Compact/Impact," because Palau and Micronesia were "US Trust Territories" from WW2, and part of granting them independence from the US was to guarantee their citizens unlimited access to the USA.
  10. To respond to your post above: 1. Shouldn't get an RFE for second "Ukrainka." Explained that she left the USA BEFORE the renewal of her Green Card at the 2 year point. I did NOT renew her Conditional Green Card. She is back in Ukraine with NO US status whatsoever. Cannot come back to the USA, which made the Annulment of Marriage an easy deal. She couldn't come back to oppose, and couldn't afford an attorney here either. Then she acknowledged notification of hearing by email! Slam-Dunk! 2. I am spending about half of my time in Ukraine these days, as Ukrainian law allows me to spend 90 of any 180 days in country. Got all the airline boarding passes as well as the passport stamps to prove that I am in Ukraine every month. Last time I found a way to expedite the NOA2; we'll see if it works this time. Maybe, maybe not. So in any case, I just spend half of my life in Ukraine. That means I do not work when I am in Ukraine. That has benefits in many ways, since I am retired from 2 jobs, and only occasionally work at a third. One of them is retired Colonel US Army. Another is former captain, United Airlines. 3. There is NO question they can ask that I am not ready to answer.
  11. I am actually getting set up to do this interview a THIRD time. The first time was with my FIRST Ukrainian wife, in 1998, in Warsaw, because the US Embassy in Kyiv was not set up to do interviews then. I was with her, but was not asked any questions, visa was granted. She, unfortunately passed away in an accident, after 13 years of being married. She was an Angel, and now she is really one. So I found another "Ukrainka" and married her, but she turned out to be a devil. I went with her to the visa interview in Kyiv in 2013. Went with her to the window for the interview, made it obvious that I am fluent in Russian, while speaking with my fiancé at the time. But had to get an annulment of that one. Now I am going back for a THIRD try at this. I anticipate that being present at her interview may help, but being absent does not hurt. And showing that you can communicate with each other in English, Russian or Ukrainian probably makes a good impression on the CO as well.
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