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ZackG222

Translation Needed After NOA 2??

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i was told to post my thread in here since you guys can be more helpful

 

but here is the link to my original thread

 

we dont need anything translated when i submit the i-129 form in the mail.

 

but once we get NOA 2  and when my fiance gets her packet in the mail, does anything need to be translated? like her birth certificate, household registration book, ect.... My fiance lives in Vietnam. does she need to get her documents translated by a professional before she mails everything and before she attends the interview at the embassy?

 

thank you

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ZackG222 said:

i was told to post my thread in here since you guys can be more helpful

 

but here is the link to my original thread

 

we dont need anything translated when i submit the i-129 form in the mail.

 

but once we get NOA 2  and when my fiance gets her packet in the mail, does anything need to be translated? like her birth certificate, household registration book, ect.... My fiance lives in Vietnam. does she need to get her documents translated by a professional before she mails everything and before she attends the interview at the embassy?

 

thank you

 

My wife brought certified translations of her birth certificate and police certificate.  The clerk provided these (for a fee) at the government office when she ordered them.  I think about $25usd each to the clerk.

 

We did not include translations of the household book or relationship evidence (plane tickets or receipts) that were in Vietnamese.

 

Make photo copies so the consulate doesn't keep your originals.  You'll need the originals again for AOS (copies when applying and original at the interview), applying for her social security number, driver's license,  etc.

 

Good Luck - Jason 

Edited by JasonGG

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17 minutes ago, JasonGG said:

My wife brought certified translations of her birth certificate and police certificate.  The clerk provided these (for a fee) at the government office when she ordered them.  I think about $25usd each to the clerk.

 

so it is 100% required to have birth certificate and police certificate translated? 

 

thanks again!

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1 hour ago, ZackG222 said:

so it is 100% required to have birth certificate and police certificate translated? 

 

thanks again!

The U.S. Consulate says all documents in Vietnamese must be translated - https://vn.usembassy.gov/visas/immigrant-visas/required-documents/.  We didn't have the passport or household book translated for the interview, though.  We figured  those are pretty easy to translate by anyone (names, address and numbers), but maybe others have had them translated.

 

It is much cheaper to have the documents translated in Vietnam than the U.S., and you will need them for a lot of things once she immigrates.  For my wife's driver's license, we had to pay an MVA-approved translator to translate her passport bio page and Vietnamese driver's licence.  It was an outrageous price - $110 - to translate what was obviously name, birth date, address, etc.  Luckily, they accepted the translations we had of her birth certificate!

 

Jason

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, JasonGG said:

The U.S. Consulate says all documents in Vietnamese must be translated - https://vn.usembassy.gov/visas/immigrant-visas/required-documents/.  We didn't have the passport or household book translated for the interview, though.  We figured  those are pretty easy to translate by anyone (names, address and numbers), but maybe others have had them translated.

 

It is much cheaper to have the documents translated in Vietnam than the U.S., and you will need them for a lot of things once she immigrates.  For my wife's driver's license, we had to pay an MVA-approved translator to translate her passport bio page and Vietnamese driver's licence.  It was an outrageous price - $110 - to translate what was obviously name, birth date, address, etc.  Luckily, they accepted the translations we had of her birth certificate!

 

Jason

Read the link again ... if the document  is in English OR Vietnamese it does NOT need to be translated.   If it’s not in either of these two languages then yes , it must be translated into English

Edited by Lil bear

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Wow!  I read that wrong when we applied and now, too.  I thought that perhaps there was a change, so I re-read the instructions we received with packet 3 in 2018, and sure enough it said "English or Vietnamese."  Thank you for clarifying!

 

You should consider getting translations done in Vietnam if you have time as you prepare for the post-K1 steps, though.  USCIS will require English translations of documents for AOS.  We also needed them for an endless list of other applications, including banking, social security, IRS, school enrollment, insurance, etc.  Translation services in Vietnam were much less expensive than the U.S. - Jason

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17 hours ago, JasonGG said:

Wow!  I read that wrong when we applied and now, too.  I thought that perhaps there was a change, so I re-read the instructions we received with packet 3 in 2018, and sure enough it said "English or Vietnamese."  Thank you for clarifying!

 

You should consider getting translations done in Vietnam if you have time as you prepare for the post-K1 steps, though.  USCIS will require English translations of documents for AOS.  We also needed them for an endless list of other applications, including banking, social security, IRS, school enrollment, insurance, etc.  Translation services in Vietnam were much less expensive than the U.S. - Jason

Shouldn't need any of that stuff for the things you mentioned but if one wants to have it in case then so be it. Back when I had mine done anything Vietnamese had to be translated to English but I never used a service but used someone that spoke both English and Vietnamese who was a friend and he did it. Just put their name and number at the bottom and everything was good to go. Cost me a beer or 2 is all. Keep things simple.

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5 hours ago, luckytxn said:

Shouldn't need any of that stuff for the things you mentioned but if one wants to have it in case then so be it.

I read and re-read the current I-485 instructions just to make sure I wasn't mistaken again . . .

 

"Translations. If you submit a document with information in a foreign language, you must also submit a full English translation. The translator must sign a certification that the English language translation is complete and accurate, and that he or she is competent to translate from the foreign language into English. The certification must include the translator’s signature. DHS recommends the certification contain the translator’s printed name and the date and the translator’s contact information."

https://www.uscis.gov/system/files_force/files/form/i-485instr.pdf?download=1

 

Since USCIS requires the translations, I won't list the relevant translation requirements for the other items in our list as they may be state- or process-specific and you will find out soon enough.  Suffice it to say, you will need your Vietnamese documents translated.  When and how you get them is up to you.  From our experience, it was much cheaper to have the documents translated and certified in Vietnam than in Maryland. 

 

Good luck! - Jason

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Posted (edited)
56 minutes ago, JasonGG said:

I read and re-read the current I-485 instructions just to make sure I wasn't mistaken again . . .

 

"Translations. If you submit a document with information in a foreign language, you must also submit a full English translation. The translator must sign a certification that the English language translation is complete and accurate, and that he or she is competent to translate from the foreign language into English. The certification must include the translator’s signature. DHS recommends the certification contain the translator’s printed name and the date and the translator’s contact information."

https://www.uscis.gov/system/files_force/files/form/i-485instr.pdf?download=1

 

Since USCIS requires the translations, I won't list the relevant translation requirements for the other items in our list as they may be state- or process-specific and you will find out soon enough.  Suffice it to say, you will need your Vietnamese documents translated.  When and how you get them is up to you.  From our experience, it was much cheaper to have the documents translated and certified in Vietnam than in Maryland. 

 

Good luck! - Jason

Find out soon enough? Been through the process already years ago and didn't need the documents that needed translation for the visa and consulate portion at all in the later processes of AOS or Citizenship. If you or others want to spend money not needed that is OK though. Also wanted to let others who have the ability to use their family or friends or even themselves to do the translations then spend money for agencies to do it for you.

Edited by luckytxn

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28 minutes ago, luckytxn said:

Find out soon enough? Been through the process already years ago and didn't need the documents that needed translation for the visa and consulate portion at all in the later processes of AOS or Citizenship. If you or others want to spend money not needed that is OK though. Also wanted to let others who have the ability to use their family or friends or even themselves to do the translations then spend money for agencies to do it for you.

Perhaps they were not required when you went through the process,, but I don't understand why you are arguing that these translation are not needed in 2019.  The current AOS instructions clearly state translated documents are required.  The I-751 to remove conditions requires translated documents.  The N-400 application for citizenship requires translated documents.   Pay $25, 2 beers, or have a family member certify them, but the OP will need translations "soon enough."  The OP doesn't say where he is from, so it could be in Houston or San Jose with large Vietnamese communities, or it could be in a small town without a Vietnamese population.  Since the OP's fiance is in Vietnam now, it is easier to get them translated now.  Even if it is 2 beers . . . it is still less costly in Vietnam.

 

In addition to requiring translated  documents for AOS , my wife and K2s were required to have translated documents in 2018 and 2019 when dealing with the motor vehicle administration, social security, IRS, public school, and for a banking issue.  IRS required certified/notarized translations and would not accept a family member's translation.  Luckily, ours were certified by the clerk in Lam Dong, so the IRS accepted them.  Perhaps @luckytxn and others have not needed translations or didn't think the USCIS needed them, but the small amount of money we spent to have them prepared with was money very well spent.

 

Best of luck  - Jason

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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, JasonGG said:

Perhaps they were not required when you went through the process,, but I don't understand why you are arguing that these translation are not needed in 2019.  The current AOS instructions clearly state translated documents are required.  The I-751 to remove conditions requires translated documents.  The N-400 application for citizenship requires translated documents.   Pay $25, 2 beers, or have a family member certify them, but the OP will need translations "soon enough."  The OP doesn't say where he is from, so it could be in Houston or San Jose with large Vietnamese communities, or it could be in a small town without a Vietnamese population.  Since the OP's fiance is in Vietnam now, it is easier to get them translated now.  Even if it is 2 beers . . . it is still less costly in Vietnam.

 

In addition to requiring translated  documents for AOS , my wife and K2s were required to have translated documents in 2018 and 2019 when dealing with the motor vehicle administration, social security, IRS, public school, and for a banking issue.  IRS required certified/notarized translations and would not accept a family member's translation.  Luckily, ours were certified by the clerk in Lam Dong, so the IRS accepted them.  Perhaps @luckytxn and others have not needed translations or didn't think the USCIS needed them, but the small amount of money we spent to have them prepared with was money very well spent.

 

Best of luck  - Jason

What documents are needed for them? AOS or citizenship did not need the documents and I never submitted any documents that were used for a visa when I did them. 2 beers are about 2 dollars where I live in Texas.

Edited by luckytxn

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17 minutes ago, luckytxn said:

What documents are needed for them? AOS or citizenship did not need the documents and I never submitted any documents that were used for a visa when I did them. 2 beers are about 2 dollars where I live in Texas.

When my wife went to get license she used her green card and never had to submit her birth certificate as she could use her passport or her SS card or green card. She didn't need her birth cert. to get her SS card. We never had to submit the documents to get her citizenship or AOS which was just a form and the paid fees except the citizenship we had to submit proof of good citizenship which was pics, etc. (They wanted lots of pics so don't skimp on these.)  Anything submitted to the consulate did not need to be translated if in English or Vietnamese anymore. If one wants to spend the money than that is on them.

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My wife's AOS required a translated birth certificate and divorce decree.  Her 2 children required translated birth certificates.

 

After arriving in the U.S., my wife got her SSN, but it was issued using the Vietnamese name order convention.  Along with the I-94 and K1, SSA required her translated birth certificate as proof of age and  passport (not translated) as proof of identity.

 

Maryland-specific: Before receiving her green card, my wife used the SSN and translated birth certificate, translated Vietnamese driver's license (required to be translated by 1 of 5 MVA-approved translators for $110), I-797, passport, MVA-accessed I-94, and utility bills to get her driver's license.  Is was a 6-month license issued using the name order on her passport/ss card.  After receiving her green card, she was able to use it and her translated birth certificate to get a "corrected" social security card.  With the corrected SS card, green card, and birth certificate, she could now apply for the 8 years driver's license with the "Americanized" name order.

 

State/county-specific: The translated birth certificate was used to issue our marriage license using my wife's "correct" American name order, not the order on her passport.

 

Before receiving her green card, my wife needed two forms of identification - passport and birth certificate - to add her name to our joint bank accounts and also open her own separate checking account.

 

My health insurance provider required translated birth certificates and the marriage license to enroll my wife and stepchildren.

 

For her children (K2s), the translated birth certificates along with passports are required to prove the relationship between mother and child when dealing with SSA, IRS, doctors, school, etc.  Add the marriage certificate and I am able to prove legal guardianship.

 

The translated birth certificates were necessary to enroll them in public school; apply for an ITIN for my stepson who followed 6 months after his mother and sister so didn't have a SSN by the 2019 tax filing season; apply to remove the "not valid to work" condition on his social security card; register them for age-specific sports (i.e.,2006 boys soccer). 

 

We also carry the birth certificates with the passports/green cards to travel as these prove parent/guardian relationship.  ANA has requested these documents before issuing boarding passes at Dulles (to prevent international kidnapping and child smuggling).  It has not been a problem with domestic carriers, though.

 

We haven't applied to remove conditions or citizenship yet, but the instructions require any documents in a foreign language be accompanied by a certified translation.

 

In short, we have needed these translated documents for many reasons.  Considering how much the entire immigration process costs from K1 to naturalization, 2 beers or $25 to get certified translations of documents is cheap!

 

If you are paying in beer but still concerned about getting translations you don't think you'll need, Vietnam will still be cheaper.  Six pack of Tiger or Saigon beer in Maryland is $10-12 vs. $4-5 in Vietnam.  :)

 

Jason

 

 

 

 

 

 

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26 minutes ago, JasonGG said:

My wife's AOS required a translated birth certificate and divorce decree.  Her 2 children required translated birth certificates.

 

After arriving in the U.S., my wife got her SSN, but it was issued using the Vietnamese name order convention.  Along with the I-94 and K1, SSA required her translated birth certificate as proof of age and  passport (not translated) as proof of identity.

 

Maryland-specific: Before receiving her green card, my wife used the SSN and translated birth certificate, translated Vietnamese driver's license (required to be translated by 1 of 5 MVA-approved translators for $110), I-797, passport, MVA-accessed I-94, and utility bills to get her driver's license.  Is was a 6-month license issued using the name order on her passport/ss card.  After receiving her green card, she was able to use it and her translated birth certificate to get a "corrected" social security card.  With the corrected SS card, green card, and birth certificate, she could now apply for the 8 years driver's license with the "Americanized" name order.

 

State/county-specific: The translated birth certificate was used to issue our marriage license using my wife's "correct" American name order, not the order on her passport.

 

Before receiving her green card, my wife needed two forms of identification - passport and birth certificate - to add her name to our joint bank accounts and also open her own separate checking account.

 

My health insurance provider required translated birth certificates and the marriage license to enroll my wife and stepchildren.

 

For her children (K2s), the translated birth certificates along with passports are required to prove the relationship between mother and child when dealing with SSA, IRS, doctors, school, etc.  Add the marriage certificate and I am able to prove legal guardianship.

 

The translated birth certificates were necessary to enroll them in public school; apply for an ITIN for my stepson who followed 6 months after his mother and sister so didn't have a SSN by the 2019 tax filing season; apply to remove the "not valid to work" condition on his social security card; register them for age-specific sports (i.e.,2006 boys soccer). 

 

We also carry the birth certificates with the passports/green cards to travel as these prove parent/guardian relationship.  ANA has requested these documents before issuing boarding passes at Dulles (to prevent international kidnapping and child smuggling).  It has not been a problem with domestic carriers, though.

 

We haven't applied to remove conditions or citizenship yet, but the instructions require any documents in a foreign language be accompanied by a certified translation.

 

In short, we have needed these translated documents for many reasons.  Considering how much the entire immigration process costs from K1 to naturalization, 2 beers or $25 to get certified translations of documents is cheap!

 

If you are paying in beer but still concerned about getting translations you don't think you'll need, Vietnam will still be cheaper.  Six pack of Tiger or Saigon beer in Maryland is $10-12 vs. $4-5 in Vietnam.  :)

 

Jason

 

 

 

 

 

 

You 100% correct about translation. For AOS birth cert translated from Vietnamese to English is needed. Anything submit  not in English need to be translate.

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