Jump to content
robhostein

Would one ever need their foreign birth certificate again?

8 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

So after becoming a citizen, and you've got your naturalization certificate, is there ever going to be a situation where you'll need your foreign birth certificate?


10-year green card received: 2004-02-01

N-400 Filed Online:  2018-11-28

N-400 Biometrics Appointment: 2018-12-20

N-400 Notice of Interview: 2019-01-04

N-400 Interview Appointment: 2019-02-21

N-400 Application Approved: 2019-02-21

N-400 Notice of Oath Ceremony: 2019-04-11

N-400 Oath Ceremony: 2019-04-18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, robhostein said:

So after becoming a citizen, and you've got your naturalization certificate, is there ever going to be a situation where you'll need your foreign birth certificate?

Of course.  It is the only record of your BIRTH.  Naturalization certs are not records of where and when a person was born.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, hypothetical. What if you lost the copy of your birth certificate that you had. And the country you came from no longer exists? I'm just curious.


10-year green card received: 2004-02-01

N-400 Filed Online:  2018-11-28

N-400 Biometrics Appointment: 2018-12-20

N-400 Notice of Interview: 2019-01-04

N-400 Interview Appointment: 2019-02-21

N-400 Application Approved: 2019-02-21

N-400 Notice of Oath Ceremony: 2019-04-11

N-400 Oath Ceremony: 2019-04-18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, robhostein said:

Okay, hypothetical. What if you lost the copy of your birth certificate that you had. And the country you came from no longer exists? I'm just curious.

Vital records from that former country will be held by whatever jurisdiction took over.  Records are records, even if they're kept in a dusty old vault.  If your BC is lost, I wouldn't worry too much about it.  If you can request a copy of it however, it would be worth doing, just to have it on hand.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Jorgedig said:

Vital records from that former country will be held by whatever jurisdiction took over.  Records are records, even if they're kept in a dusty old vault.  If your BC is lost, I wouldn't worry too much about it.  If you can request a copy of it however, it would be worth doing, just to have it on hand.  

Ah, well now I know. I still have my birth certificate and my birth country definitely still exists. Just always wondered what it's like for those whose country ceases to exist.


10-year green card received: 2004-02-01

N-400 Filed Online:  2018-11-28

N-400 Biometrics Appointment: 2018-12-20

N-400 Notice of Interview: 2019-01-04

N-400 Interview Appointment: 2019-02-21

N-400 Application Approved: 2019-02-21

N-400 Notice of Oath Ceremony: 2019-04-11

N-400 Oath Ceremony: 2019-04-18

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, countries dont evaporate. Unless they become failed states where records are impossible, the succeeding states will generally issue replacement birth certificates. For those holding dual nationality, birth certificates may be required for renewing passports from abroad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, robhostein said:

Ah, well now I know. I still have my birth certificate and my birth country definitely still exists. Just always wondered what it's like for those whose country ceases to exist.

 

My Mom was born in South Vietnam, or officially the Republic of Vietnam. That country ceased to exist in 1975, defeated by the Communists North Vietnam, officially the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. That marked the end of the Vietnam War, as it is known in the US (in Vietnam, it is known as “the glorious victory against the American Empire” lol but that a different story). Anyway, her birth certificate record is still preserved in the same district she was born throughout the war and all that. She could just walked up there any time and request a certified extract. They even can issue an English translated version for a small fee!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure that anyone keeping up with world news realizes that there are several countries in world where virtually all records of any type have been destroyed.

 

Thus there are many who would NEVER be able to obtain copy of ANY birth records.



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Time Line - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

10 YEAR GREEN CARD PROCESS

July 22, 2017  ROC packet sent to Vermont.

July 24, 2017  ROC packet signed for in Vermont.

August 8, 2017  NOA received at house.  15 days since ROC signed for in VSC.

August 12, 2017 ASC appointment received. 19 days since ROC in VSC.

August 25, 2017 BIO completed. 32 days since ROC received in VSC.

August 11, 2018  18 month 'Courtesy Copy' extension letter received.  Critical number  297

October 20, 2018 18 month 'Official' extension letter received.  Critical number 297

December 4, 2018  USCIS Account shows: We approved your Form I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residence, 

December 4, 2018, ordered your new card for Receipt # EAC17297003XX, and will mail to the address you gave.

491 days from NOA issued by VSC until Petition approved.

December 7, 2018 USCIS sent notice:  Card mailed.

December 12, 2018 Ten year Green Card received from Lees Summit, MO

499 days from NOA issued by VSC until Green Card received.

- - - - - - - - - - 

CITIZENSHIP PROCESS

December 6, 2018 submitted N-400 application on-line.  Estimated Completion Time: 8 months or August 2019.

December 8, 2018 received notice on USCIS that Biometrics scheduled . . . but the actual date was not yet shown.

December 11, 2018 saw in 'Documents' section of USCIS that Bio scheduled for 24 December 2018.

December 21, 2018 saw on USCIS website that they will be closed 24 December 2018 as extra holiday.

January 9, 2019 went for re-scheduled BIO appointment.  33 days after N-400 submitted on-line.

February 19, 2019 received letter in US mail that Citizenship interview scheduled for 26 March 2019. 74 days after submission on-line.

March 26, 2019 Citizenship interview scheduled for.  109 days after N-400 submitted on-line.

March 26, 2019 Passed Citizenship interview.

April 12, 2019  Received notice that Oath Ceremony had been scheduled for 24 April 2019.  17 days after interview.

April 24, 2019  Oath Ceremony completed.  29 days after interview.     139 days after N-400 submitted on-line.

April 25, 2019  USA Passport Application submitted.

May 3, 2019     USA Passport received.    149 days after N-400 submitted on-line.

May 9, 2019     Certificate of Naturalization and Citizenship returned in mail.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×
×
  • Create New...