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How to show TWO Citizenship on I-130/G-325A

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My wife was born in Ukraine, she has citizenship from Ukraine. And she also recently gained citizenship of Turkey, since we have been living in Turkey for the last five years.

Does anyone have any idea as to how to fill out the I-130/G-325A docs in regards to this?

Do I basically write down "Ukraine/Turkey" at the citizenship/nationality section of G-325A?

Thanks!!

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My wife was born in Ukraine, she has citizenship from Ukraine. And she also recently gained citizenship of Turkey, since we have been living in Turkey for the last five years.

Does anyone have any idea as to how to fill out the I-130/G-325A docs in regards to this?

Do I basically write down "Ukraine/Turkey" at the citizenship/nationality section of G-325A?

Thanks!!

Are you sure your wife have 2 citizenships??? As Ukraine doesn't recognize dual citizenship.

I would write Turkey, since this is ultimately where you will have an interview, and this is the latest citizenship she received. Also make sure that your wife will need to obtain a Police Certificate from Ukraine as well for the interview.


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"Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will direct your paths." (Proverbs 3, 5-6)

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I had Irish and Swiss citizenship (Swiss by birth, Irish because I lived there all my adult life). I put Irish because I had no valid Swiss passport anymore and we lived in Ireland. That was fine, but they put Swiss on my visa because I guess birth citizenship is more important to them (nothing was said to me about it, I just discovered it when looking at the visa and later greencard).


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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Are you sure your wife have 2 citizenships??? As Ukraine doesn't recognize dual citizenship.

I would write Turkey, since this is ultimately where you will have an interview, and this is the latest citizenship she received. Also make sure that your wife will need to obtain a Police Certificate from Ukraine as well for the interview.

Can I ask, why would my wife need to obtain a police certificate from Ukraine, IF we have been living in Turkey for several years, that she is a Turkish citizen and that she will be entering the interview at the US Embassy in Ankara/Turkey?

Correct/Pravda :) My wife has 2 citizenships. She is Ukrainian, and we have been living in Turkey for the last 4 yrs, because I am (USC) originally a Turkish citizen, so we were originally staying and living in Turkey, and that is why we applied and got a Turkish cit'ship for her.

It is true that Ukraine does not recognize dual citizenship, and US does not recognize, either. But I myself am a citizen of both Turkey and US.

(Additionally, our 3.5 yr old son is a citizen of Ukraine, Turkey and US! Kinda like James Bond lol)

However, every law and citizenship to its own. I know that US laws does not see dual citizenship as a problem, judging by the US Ankara/Turkey embassy website.

It is just a matter of how to mention/fill out on immigrant visa docs (I-130/G-325A) as far as I can see.

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Can I ask, why would my wife need to obtain a police certificate from Ukraine, IF we have been living in Turkey for several years, that she is a Turkish citizen and that she will be entering the interview at the US Embassy in Ankara/Turkey?

Correct/Pravda :) My wife has 2 citizenships. She is Ukrainian, and we have been living in Turkey for the last 4 yrs, because I am (USC) originally a Turkish citizen, so we were originally staying and living in Turkey, and that is why we applied and got a Turkish cit'ship for her.

It is true that Ukraine does not recognize dual citizenship, and US does not recognize, either. But I myself am a citizen of both Turkey and US.

(Additionally, our 3.5 yr old son is a citizen of Ukraine, Turkey and US! Kinda like James Bond lol)

However, every law and citizenship to its own. I know that US laws does not see dual citizenship as a problem, judging by the US Ankara/Turkey embassy website.

It is just a matter of how to mention/fill out on immigrant visa docs (I-130/G-325A) as far as I can see.

Actually US does recognize dual citizenship and I am a dual citizenship as well.

According to the State Department you need to obtain a police certificate from every country where you lived since being 16 years old. I am assuming your wife left Ukraine when she was older then 16, otherwise she wouldn't be able to obtain a passport, so yes you would need a police certificate from the Ukraine.

As Pinguin mentioned put Turkey since this is where you live now.


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"Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will direct your paths." (Proverbs 3, 5-6)

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I had Irish and Swiss citizenship (Swiss by birth, Irish because I lived there all my adult life). I put Irish because I had no valid Swiss passport anymore and we lived in Ireland. That was fine, but they put Swiss on my visa because I guess birth citizenship is more important to them (nothing was said to me about it, I just discovered it when looking at the visa and later greencard).

Thanks for your response.

So, if I understand correctly, on G-325A, at Citizenship/Nationality, you put it down as "Irish", and at City and Country of Birth, as XXX,Switzerland

And on I-130, you simply mentioned your Place of Birth as Switzerland. Is this correct as far as you can remember?

In that case, you are right, birth citizenship must be more important to them.

I am also thinking of keeping things simple and non-complicated, and NOT mentioning my wife's Turkish citizenship at all on visa docs. Just that she is a Ukrainian citizen and we have been living in Turkey until this time.

I wonder if this would cause any problem down the road.

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Actually US does recognize dual citizenship and I am a dual citizenship as well.

According to the State Department you need to obtain a police certificate from every country where you lived since being 16 years old. I am assuming your wife left Ukraine when she was older then 16, otherwise she wouldn't be able to obtain a passport, so yes you would need a police certificate from the Ukraine.

As Pinguin mentioned put Turkey since this is where you live now.

Well, of course she has a Ukrainian passport and left Ukraine when she was like 25. But I don't understand why she would need a police certificate from Ukraine, IF she has nothing to do with Ukraine when she is applying for an immigrant visa at a US Embassy in Turkey. What kind of police cert. is this?

Wait a second, is this police certificate required by the US Immigration? That, she will need such police certificate both from Turkish and Ukrainian police??

Thanks!

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Well, of course she has a Ukrainian passport and left Ukraine when she was like 25. But I don't understand why she would need a police certificate from Ukraine, IF she has nothing to do with Ukraine when she is applying for an immigrant visa at a US Embassy in Turkey. What kind of police cert. is this?

Wait a second, is this police certificate required by the US Immigration? That, she will need such police certificate both from Turkish and Ukrainian police??

Thanks!

Yes it is for the immigration so you will need from both places. In Ukraine it could be obtained from the Ministry of Internal Affairs, you may want to contact Ukraine Embassy for that, when you will get closer to your interview.

I am also thinking of keeping things simple and non-complicated, and NOT mentioning my wife's Turkish citizenship at all on visa docs. Just that she is a Ukrainian citizen and we have been living in Turkey until this time.

I wonder if this would cause any problem down the road.

Don't lie to US Immigration. They will find out eventually and can only cause more problems.


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"Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge him, and he will direct your paths." (Proverbs 3, 5-6)

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Yes, that is how I wrote it. I did bring my expired Swiss passport to the interview as it had travel stamps, but they never asked to see it.

Oksana & Max are correct- never lie to US immigration. There is nothing wrong with having two citizenships! Also, the police cert will mention any arrests or convictions she had. US immigration want to know if she's ever been in trouble, even if it was 20 years ago.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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Yes it is for the immigration so you will need from both places. In Ukraine it could be obtained from the Ministry of Internal Affairs, you may want to contact Ukraine Embassy for that, when you will get closer to your interview.

Don't lie to US Immigration. They will find out eventually and can only cause more problems.

OK, Thanks! But at the initial stage of application (sending out of I-130/G-325/bonifide marriage related pics etc) this police certificate is not needed, only later, when it gets closer to interview time, am I correct?

Is there a po Russki name for this police certificate?? Could you please write me what kind of a police certificate it must be, in english or in Russian alphabet, please? So I can show it to my wife and we will try to make it ready, earlier the better!

It is VERY hard to get things done in Ukraine without bribing, and it is very hard to get correct information from the Ukr'n embassy in Ankara.

Spasibo bolshoi! :)

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Yes, that is how I wrote it. I did bring my expired Swiss passport to the interview as it had travel stamps, but they never asked to see it.

Oksana & Max are correct- never lie to US immigration. There is nothing wrong with having two citizenships! Also, the police cert will mention any arrests or convictions she had. US immigration want to know if she's ever been in trouble, even if it was 20 years ago.

Yeah I mean I don't plan on lying to US immig. Just that it'd keep things simple. I guess I will fill out same like you did, as you did not mention you being a Swiss citizen on G-325A Citizenship/Nationality section, you simply mentioned being an Irish (even though you have a non-valid Swiss passport, this does not stop you from being a Swiss citizen. Technically, you should have filled it out as Irish and Swiss, I think) So I will go ahead and fill out as you did! Thanks of bunch as in always!

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thats confusing she has two nationalities already applying for the third one :) am not really sure

Applying for a US spousal visa is not the same as applying for naturalization.


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Ukraine prohibits its citizens to have another citizenship. If your wife became a Turkish national, that's what she is now, exclusively. If she at any time becomes a U.S. citizen, she can retain her Turkish citizenship.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Ukraine prohibits its citizens to have another citizenship. If your wife became a Turkish national, that's what she is now, exclusively. If she at any time becomes a U.S. citizen, she can retain her Turkish citizenship.

This information you spead on this forum all the time. Well, guess what, it is wrong. You stay a Ukrainian citizen and considered as such by the State of Ukraine until you renounse you Ukrainian citizenship, what is not easy to do. Not allowing dual citizenship from their part basically means that they don't care about and will not recognize your aquired second citizenship in Ukraine (the only place where they have the right to do that) Anywhere else on the planet you are de facto a dual citizen.

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