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Hiring a Lawyer for Adjustment?

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We are about to do the physical and submitting response to I-864 Aff. of Support RFE. At this stage we are beginning to wonder if hiring a LAWYER might be a good idea? Has anyone done this, and did you find the way smoothed at all from it? (Tho the cost may be daunting-are there any free legal attorney organizations for immigration?)

I was thinking that besides the idea of the legal knowledge of an attorney, that it may show we are very serious & determined in this matter.

{ Yet I do not want to anger Immigration nor throw the process out of order ! }

Also we've been told by some, dealing with other gov agencies, that it has helped them. But do not know of anyone using one for Status Adjustment. And would certainly like to hear about your experience or what you have heard about this idea.

Apparently some folks feel that involving an attorney may be beneficial as representing somewhat of an authority figure on your side too?

* * *

Also we were wondering about letters of support from friends or family. Does it help to really go overboard with those and get as many as possible?

* * *

Thank you for any help and advice you can give.

Most Sincerely, Craig [Kate's Husband]

Sorry for my wordiness. I do not know as much about this as my wife :)


AOS TIMELINE

16th December 2005 - Sent I-130, AOS, EAD & AP USPS overnight to Chicago Lockbox

18th December 2005 - Received at Chicago 9.18pm.

23rd December 2005 - NOAs for I-130, AOS, EAD, AP!! Didn't expect them that quickly

13th January 2006 - RFE for Medical and additional I-864 info

17th January 2006 - INFOPASS Apt about RFE.

23rd January 2006 - Appointment notice for Biometrics on 10th Feb.

10th February 2006 - Biometrics Appointment

21st February 2006 - Medical. Cost $250 including all blood tests, Td Shot, TB test and Titers for MMR and Varicella.

27th February 2006 - Appointment with immigration lawyer re. RFE for I-864.

1st March 2006 - Final results Medical. Papers in hand to send.

10th March 2006 - RFE responses to Lees Summit

13th March 2006 - RFE responses signed for at Lees Summit

24th March 2006 - Emergency AP approved in Omaha

28th March 2006- Collected AP

31st March 2006 - EAD Approval online

7th April 2006 - EAD arrived in mailbox.

21st April 2006- Received Interview Date for 22nd June

9th May 2006- Received SSN

22nd June 2006- AOS INTERVIEW APPROVED

REMOVING CONDITIONS

June 20 2008 - Package mailed to CSC under new rules. Would have been an NSC transfer

June 23 2008 - Package recieved at CSC

June 27 2008 - Recieve NOA1

July 16 2008 - Biometrics

July 17 2008 - Touched

September 9 2008 - Card production ordered

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Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Thailand
Timeline
We are about to do the physical and submitting response to I-864 Aff. of Support RFE. At this stage we are beginning to wonder if hiring a LAWYER might be a good idea? Has anyone done this, and did you find the way smoothed at all from it? (Tho the cost may be daunting-are there any free legal attorney organizations for immigration?)

I was thinking that besides the idea of the legal knowledge of an attorney, that it may show we are very serious & determined in this matter.

{ Yet I do not want to anger Immigration nor throw the process out of order ! }

Also we've been told by some, dealing with other gov agencies, that it has helped them. But do not know of anyone using one for Status Adjustment. And would certainly like to hear about your experience or what you have heard about this idea.

Apparently some folks feel that involving an attorney may be beneficial as representing somewhat of an authority figure on your side too?

* * *

Also we were wondering about letters of support from friends or family. Does it help to really go overboard with those and get as many as possible?

* * *

Thank you for any help and advice you can give.

Most Sincerely, Craig [Kate's Husband]

Sorry for my wordiness. I do not know as much about this as my wife :)

I asked this same question before I was getting ready to file my I-129F. The response I got from most people on here was that there is enough information on this website and in this forums to guide you through the process without the need for a lawyer. If you have questions about something either do a forum search, google search, or just post a new question. I don't think a lawyer shows whether you are determined. I read a post last week of one guy who used a lawyer, but the lawyer wasn't very good, and he had to do everything himself anyway. So in that case it's not just a matter of finding a lawyer, but finding a good lawyer.

As for letters of support, I would say the more you have the better. It doesn't hurt to at least have the extra support.

Good luck.

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Filed: Country: Romania
Timeline

I would say that, as long as your situation is straightforward, you don't need to worry about a lawyer. I've read numerous accounts of people whose lawyers slowed down the process considerably (didn't send all the right forms, were slow to reply to RFEs, etc.). Judging by your timeline, it doesn't look like you've run into any serious problem as yet (and it sounds like you took care of the RFE requirements). So I wouldn't worry about it. Good luck!


US Citizen since August 09.

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Filed: Country: Singapore
Timeline
At this stage we are beginning to wonder if hiring a LAWYER might be a good idea?

* * *

Also we were wondering about letters of support from friends or family. Does it help to really go overboard with those and get as many as possible?

1. As long as you can read and write in English, are prepared to take your time to understand and comply with all the instructions in the forms, and you don't have a complicated case, you don't need a lawyer. My husband and I did not consider the necessity of spending extra money on someone to do something we could do ourselves.

2. Letters of support are not necessary, although some have gotten them anyway just in case. It is my understanding from the guides here that they are more important when it is time to lift the conditions of the permanent residency.

We brought a certified copy of our marriage certificate, joint bank statements, utility bills with both our names on them, his life insurance policy which clearly states that I am the direct beneficiary, some e-mails written between us and our families, and lots of photographs to our interview. Our interviewing officer kept a few e-mails, a couple of copies of our bills, and our marriage certificate for the file.

Edited by Ephesia

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We never used a lawyer and I was glad we didn't. Everything is so easy and self explanatory and I never felt the need to pay money for someone else to do the forms that took all of 10 minutes to fill out.

When I went to my interview a few days ago, we actually talked quite a bit to the officer who interviewed us. My husband and I brought up how it seemed like the waiting room was FULL of lawyers. It seemed as if everyone there but us had them. She agreed and told us she felt like a lawyer was a waste of time and money. She said herself and no one she worked with ever really felt like the presence of a lawyer really changed anything. She said in fact it usually made her think, "Why are you trying so hard? What's really going on here? The forms are simple, so why is this necessary?"

I just thought it was interesting to hear, coming from an actual immigration officer.

So I guess there's that to take into consideration.

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Unless there is something complicated with your petition you can easily follow the guides here on VJ and save yourself some money. Good luck


usa_fl_sm_nwm.gifphilippines_fl_md_clr.gif

United States & Republic of the Philippines

"Life is hard; it's harder if you're stupid." John Wayne

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Filed: Country: Spain
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The forms are all easy, and you should have all the information available to you if have done everything IAW the rules. I cant see anything that a lawyer could add, unless youu need the clerical help of filling out an I-485 and I-864, etc.


I finally got rid of the never ending money drain. I called the plumber, and got the problem fixed. I wish her the best.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

I feel that the AOS was actually easier than the K1; maybe beause the K1 was all new and the I864 forms etc. are just a different form with the same info. My opinion would be that a lawyer may help you more with the K1 than with the AOS and once you have the forms for K1 you can use them to do the AOS by just following the instructions! My friend who interpreted for us during tha AOS used a lawyer for K1 and I told him how I felt this was easier and he is definitely going to start out on his own and save the almost $3000 that the lawyer wants for the AOS! Good Luck

Edited by motu

2005

K1

March 2 Filed I-129 F

July 21 Interview in Bogota ** Approved ** Very Easy!

AOS

Oct 19 Mailed AOS Packet to Chicago

2006

Feb 17 AOS interview in Denver. Biometrics also done today! (Interviewing officer ordered them.)

Apr 25 Green card received

2008

Removal of conditions

March 17 Refiled using new I-751 form

April 16 Biometrics done

July 10 Green card production ordered

2009

Citizenship

Jan 20 filed N400

Feb 04 NOA date

Feb 24 Biometrics

May 5 Interview - Centennial (Denver, Colorado) Passed

June 10 Oath Ceremony - Teikyo Loretto Heights, Denver, Colorado

July 7 Received Passport in 3 weeks

Shredded all immigration papers Have scanned images

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Filed: Timeline

If you file your own taxes you can file your own AOS paperwork. If you get stuck on a question, there are enough people here that have filed an been approved that can help without you going to a lawyer.

Now if you are lazy and/or brain dead and have money to blow, then go get a lawyer.

The only time it would be worth at least consulting with a layer is if there is something involved like a previous overstay or criminal charge.

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