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gigant

lawyer Cannot be in the room with me: is that True?

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Filed: Timeline

Hello everyone,

I am thinking to hire a lawyer to go with me for the N400;

The intention is to smooth things with CIS for a violation conviction that, unfortunately, I have on my history;

One Immigration advisor stated that for the N400, the lawyer can only enter the CIS bulding NOT the interview room : IS THAT TRUE?

if that s true, if I hire a lawyer It would be almost useless

Please advice

thank you all

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Hi,

most probably, the lawyer will not be able to enter the interview room with you since it is about you. The lawyer, however, could provide you with better methods of explaining your history and could even help you fill out the form properly.


N-400 Naturalization Timeline

06/28/11 .. Mailed N-400 package via Priority mail with delivery confirmation

06/30/11 .. Package Delivered to Dallas Lockbox

07/06/11 .. Received e-mail notification of application acceptance

07/06/11 .. Check cashed

07/08/11 .. Received NOA letter

07/29/11 .. Received text/e-mail for biometrics notice

08/03/11 .. Received Biometrics letter - scheduled for 8/24/11

08/04/11 .. Walk-in finger prints done.

08/08/11 .. Received text/e-mail: Placed in line for interview scheduling

09/12/11 .. Received Yellow letter dated 9/7/11

09/13/11 .. Received text/e-mail: Interview scheduled

09/16/11 .. Received interview letter

10/19/11 .. Interview - PASSED

10/20/11 .. Received text/email: Oath scheduled

10/22/11 .. Received OATH letter

11/09/11 .. Oath ceremony

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I have seen people enter the interview room with their lawyer. Why couldn't a lawyer come in if he is there to represent you?


ROC 2009
Naturalization 2010

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

If you can make heads or tails out of this:

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.eb1d4c2a3e5b9ac89243c6a7543f6d1a/?vgnextchannel=3dc29c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1RCRD&vgnextoid=3dc29c7755cb9010VgnVCM10000045f3d6a1RCRD

I think the answer is yes.

This one from an attorney website also seems to think so.

http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/question-28229.html

But why don't you ask this question from an attorney?

That USCIS site above does have good advice on finding a good attorney, know that some people came here with absolute disgust on how their attorney made a big mess of things.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: England
Timeline

Wouldn't turning up with a lawyer ring a few bells ?

If one had one's lawyer present when proposing marriage, the lady might get suspicious...

Edited by saywhat

moresheep400100.jpg

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
Timeline

I had a lawyer for my AOS interview and she had been present for several naturalization interviews, so they definitely are allowed in the room. It's not weird to have an interview present for an immigration matter - it's an overwhelming process and a lot of people with completely straightforward cases hire lawyers since so much is at stake. They are totally used to people both using lawyers and doing things on their own and neither one raises a flag.


AOS (from tourist w/overstay)

1/26/10 - NOA

5/04/10 - interview appt - approved

ROC

2/06/12 - NOA date

7/31/12 - card production ordered

N-400

2/08/13 - NOA date

3/05/13 - biometrics appt

6/18/13 - interview - passed!

7/18/13 - oath ceremony

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
Timeline

I wonder if it varies by location. I know when I was going for my citizenship interview there were others there with lawyers - and the interviewing officers kindly but firmly told them 'no' the lawyer was not able to come in to the interview with them. I noticed one couple come out and their lawyer go up to meet them to ask them how things had transpired. Their application was denied and I could hear the lawyer giving advice about what they would do next - I wasn't able to hear enough of the conversation to understand why they were denied nor why they had a lawyer in the first place. That being said, even if a lawyer is not able to accompany you, with your situation it would certainly be a useful exercise to meet with one to discuss your circumstances. Even in the interview the lawyer would not be able to answer any of the questions about your application - only you can do that - so I am not sure what value a lawyer would be in the actual interview; getting prepared for the interview - yes, definitely; at the interview - probably not.

Oh - to clarify about the 'couple' - one family member went as an interpretor for the other who was an elderly woman.

Edited by Kathryn41

“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

5892822976_477b1a77f7_z.jpg

Another Member of the VJ Fluffy Kitty Posse!

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
Timeline

I wonder if it varies by location. I know when I was going for my citizenship interview there were others there with lawyers - and the interviewing officers kindly but firmly told them 'no' the lawyer was not able to come in to the interview with them. I noticed one couple come out and their lawyer go up to meet them to ask them how things had transpired. Their application was denied and I could hear the lawyer giving advice about what they would do next - I wasn't able to hear enough of the conversation to understand why they were denied nor why they had a lawyer in the first place. That being said, even if a lawyer is not able to accompany you, with your situation it would certainly be a useful exercise to meet with one to discuss your circumstances. Even in the interview the lawyer would not be able to answer any of the questions about your application - only you can do that - so I am not sure what value a lawyer would be in the actual interview; getting prepared for the interview - yes, definitely; at the interview - probably not.

Oh - to clarify about the 'couple' - one family member went as an interpretor for the other who was an elderly woman.

Maybe - it seems weird that it would be different at different places, but I don't know why else it would be different. Our lawyer told us a story about being present even during the oral citizenship exam given during the N400 interview and her client looking towards her when she didn't know an answer and how she had to give no reaction at all, so she was definitely there. There seems to be so much inconsistency in this whole process that you just kinda have to go with it as it comes.


AOS (from tourist w/overstay)

1/26/10 - NOA

5/04/10 - interview appt - approved

ROC

2/06/12 - NOA date

7/31/12 - card production ordered

N-400

2/08/13 - NOA date

3/05/13 - biometrics appt

6/18/13 - interview - passed!

7/18/13 - oath ceremony

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

Gigant never got involved in the question of solicitation. Doesn't have to here, but being a traveler can just visualize a prostitute soliciting him, he agreeing, then be arrested. Really a low down trick. Even a worse scam if to follow that gal into a motel room where you meet a couple of big guys the pound the ####### out of you and rob you. Didn't happen to me, but to associates. Don't have to stick your hand in boiling water to learn you can get burned.

There is also a form of legal prostitution call a marriage certificate, I sure got suckered into that and was legally robbed blind. A guy can't be too careful.

I did hire an immigration law firm to help me sort out and fill out all those forms, plus all that evidence. Was way too busy with my job to fool around with that. They didn't show up at our AOS, but the IO commented upon seeing the G-28's attached to all of our forms with a very respected immigration law firm. Just commented that when I started to read all those forms, my head started spinning, she agreed with that, but was extremely nice to us. She didn't want to see any of our original documentation, and approved both my wife and daughter for their conditional green cards.

Not sure if Gigant was suckered or not, as I said before, wasn't born paranoid, but sure became that way.

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Filed: Other Timeline

Hi Gigant,

I don't know about your specific case and about lawyers and the N-400....

But I do know that lawyers are allowed in the interview room (at least here in Buffalo, NY anyways) for immigration-related interviews...

For example, when I had my AOS interview....the lawyer that we hired (ours was a complicated case, that's why we hired one) went with us in the interview room....

It was quite a hillarious situation, with the four of us (me, my husband, the lawyer, and the immigration officer, squeezed together in a tiny office....._)

But it all worked out well..and I got approved...lol........

And they had no problems with that...

Though for the N-400, I went by myself (we didn't hire a lawyer this time) to the interview room...

And my husband and my son waited outside in the waiting room...

So on that note, they didn't want anyone else in the room.....

But I got approved anyways....

And for my private oath ceremony a few days later.....

We all squeezed into the same interview/office room....

(two immigration officers, me, my husband, my son...)

So in that case, they let everyone in the room....During the ceremony....lol....

So it all depends on the situation and up to the immigration officer really, as to who is allowed in the room during the interview process...

So hopefully in your situation they can be understanding there....

Here is another idea:

-On the N-400 application you can attach a note/letter saying that you are bringing your lawyer. Maybe they can accomodate for that too, if they know about that in advance.....

-But even if your lawyer couldn't be with you, it's good to have a lawyer look over your application and go through any other issues/problems beforehand, so that you are able to handle that when you do go for your interview...

Maybe you can have your lawyer present a letter about your case too, in case they can't go into the interview room.....

Personally, if you have a complicated/difficult case...

It's better to have a lawyer than it is not to have one......

Better safe than sorry....

Anyways, I hope this helps. Good luck with your lawyer and good luck with your N-400 application too.

Ant

Hello everyone,

I am thinking to hire a lawyer to go with me for the N400;

The intention is to smooth things with CIS for a violation conviction that, unfortunately, I have on my history;

One Immigration advisor stated that for the N400, the lawyer can only enter the CIS bulding NOT the interview room : IS THAT TRUE?

if that s true, if I hire a lawyer It would be almost useless

Please advice

thank you all

I had a lawyer for my AOS interview and she had been present for several naturalization interviews, so they definitely are allowed in the room. It's not weird to have an interview present for an immigration matter - it's an overwhelming process and a lot of people with completely straightforward cases hire lawyers since so much is at stake. They are totally used to people both using lawyers and doing things on their own and neither one raises a flag.

Edited by Ant+D+BabyA

**Ant's 1432.gif1502.gif "Once Upon An American Immigration Journey" Condensed Timeline...**

2000 (72+ Months) "Loved": Long-Distance Dating Relationship. D Visited Ant in Canada.

2006 (<1 Month) "Visited": Ant Visited D in America. B-2 Visa Port of Entry Interrogation.

2006 (<1 Month) "Married": Wedding Elopement. Husband & Wife, D and Ant !! Together Forever!

2006 ( 3 Months I-485 Wait) "Adjusted": 2-Years Green Card.

2007 ( 2 Months) "Numbered": SSN Card.

2007 (<1 Months) "Licensed": NYS 4-Years Driver's License.

2009 (10 Months I-751 Wait) "Removed": 10-Years 5-Months Green Card.

2009 ( 9 Months Baby Wait) "Expected": Baby. It's a Boy, Baby A !!! We Are Family, Ant+D+BabyA !

2009 ( 4 Months) "Moved": New House Constructed and Moved Into.

2009 ( 2 Months N-400 Wait) "Naturalized": US Citizenship, Certificate of Naturalization. Goodbye USCIS!!!!

***Ant is a Naturalized American Citizen!!***: November 23, 2009 (Private Oath Ceremony: USCIS Office, Buffalo, NY, USA)

2009 (<1 Month) "Secured": US Citizen SSN Card.

2009 (<1 Month) "Enhanced": US Citizen NYS 8-Years Enhanced Driver's License. (in lieu of a US Passport)

2010 ( 1 Month) "Voted": US Citizen NYS Voter's Registration Card.

***~~~"The End...And the Americans, Ant+D+BabyA, lived 'Happily Ever After'!"...~~~***

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Filed: Timeline

Hi Gigant,

I don't know about your specific case and about lawyers and the N-400....

But I do know that lawyers are allowed in the interview room (at least here in Buffalo, NY anyways) for immigration-related interviews...

For example, when I had my AOS interview....the lawyer that we hired (ours was a complicated case, that's why we hired one) went with us in the interview room....

It was quite a hillarious situation, with the four of us (me, my husband, the lawyer, and the immigration officer, squeezed together in a tiny office....._)

But it all worked out well..and I got approved...lol........

And they had no problems with that...

Though for the N-400, I went by myself (we didn't hire a lawyer this time) to the interview room...

And my husband and my son waited outside in the waiting room...

So on that note, they didn't want anyone else in the room.....

But I got approved anyways....

And for my private oath ceremony a few days later.....

We all squeezed into the same interview/office room....

(two immigration officers, me, my husband, my son...)

So in that case, they let everyone in the room....During the ceremony....lol....

So it all depends on the situation and up to the immigration officer really, as to who is allowed in the room during the interview process...

So hopefully in your situation they can be understanding there....

Here is another idea:

-On the N-400 application you can attach a note/letter saying that you are bringing your lawyer. Maybe they can accomodate for that too, if they know about that in advance.....

-But even if your lawyer couldn't be with you, it's good to have a lawyer look over your application and go through any other issues/problems beforehand, so that you are able to handle that when you do go for your interview...

Maybe you can have your lawyer present a letter about your case too, in case they can't go into the interview room.....

Personally, if you have a complicated/difficult case...

It's better to have a lawyer than it is not to have one......

Better safe than sorry....

Anyways, I hope this helps. Good luck with your lawyer and good luck with your N-400 application too.

Ant

I have a violation conviction in my record, I agree that is a good idea to have a lawyer looking over the form PRIOR filing;

Would have a lawyer at the interview, (if allowed) increase the chances to pass? they can t answer the IO questions but they can smooth things if a IO question is inappropriate..

What if I schedule an INFOPASS to Garden City (NY) office and aske them directly if the lawyer can be with me?

(if they cannot enter the room with me I d lose the attorney fee that can add up to 2,000$

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Filed: Other Timeline

What if I schedule an INFOPASS to Garden City (NY) office and aske them directly if the lawyer can be with me?

(if they cannot enter the room with me I d lose the attorney fee that can add up to 2,000$

A lawyer should offer a free consultation. This is something you want to ask an immigration attorney in your area. An Immigration Attorney who practices in your area should know if s/he is allowed to accompany you to an N400 interview. Don't trust what INFOPASS tell you, trust what the attorney who practices in your area tell you. That said, make sure you talk to several local area immigration attorney, not just one, and see what the consensus is.


AOS I-485

07/10/07 - Sent I-485 via USPS Priority Mail to Chicago Lockbox

07/23/07 - Received NOA1 in my home mailbox

08/13/07 - Received ASC Biometrics Appointment Letter in my home mailbox

08/31/07 - USCIS mailed out Appointment letter with Postmark Date 8/31/07

09/04/07 - Received actual Appointment Letter (Interivew Date 10/30/07)

09/06/07 - Completed Biometrics Appointment at local ASC

10/30/07 - Scheduled AOS Interview Appointment - Approved

I-751

08/13/09 - Sent I-751 to CSC

08/17/09 - Receipt date of NOA

09/16/09 - Biometrics

09/17/09 - "Touched"

12/15/09 - Card production ordered

12/17/09 - Approval notice sent

12/21/09 - Received 10-Year GC and Welcome Letter

N-400

08/16/10 - Sent N-400 to AZ Lockbox via USPS First Class Mail with Delivery Confirmation

08/18/10 - USPS Confirms delivery: August 18, 2010, 9:57 am, PHOENIX, AZ 85036

08/24/10 - Check #501 for $675 cleared my account @ 11:20 pm EDT

08/27/10 - Received NOA dated 8/23/10 with a Priority date of 8/18/10

09/07/10 - Received Biometric RFE dated 9/3/10 -- Fingerprint apt. schedule 10/1/10

10/01/10 - Fingerprint Appointment-- Completed

10/09/10 - Received Interview Appointment Letter dated 10/6/10 for scheduled interview on 11/09/10

11/09/10 - Interview Passed

11/18/10 - Oath Ceremony

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When I filed for removal of conditions on my green card I used a lawyer and he sat in on the interview with me. This is here at the Atlanta DO so I'm not sure if it differs from place to place, but from what I hear lawyers are allowed in the Atlanta Office.

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