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Obama The Preferred Candidate Around The World: Poll

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Filed: Country: Philippines
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WASHINGTON — People around the globe widely expect the next American president to improve the country's policies toward the rest of the world, especially if Barack Obama is elected, yet they retain a persistently poor image of the U.S., according to a poll released Thursday.

The survey of two dozen countries, conducted this spring by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center, also found a growing despondency over the international economy, with majorities in 18 nations calling domestic economic conditions poor. In more bad news for the U.S., people shared a widespread sense the American economy was hurting their countries, including large majorities in U.S. allies Britain, Germany, Australia, Turkey, France and Japan.

Even six in 10 Americans agreed the U.S. economy was having a negative impact abroad.

Views of the U.S. improved or stayed the same as last year in 18 nations, the first positive signs the poll has found for the U.S. image worldwide this decade. Even so, many improvements were modest and the U.S. remains less popular in most countries than it was before it invaded Iraq in 2003, with majorities in only eight expressing favorable opinions.

Substantial numbers in most countries said they are closely following the U.S. presidential election, including 83 percent in Japan _ about the same proportion who said so in the U.S. Of those following the campaign, optimism that the new president will reshape American foreign policy for the better is substantial, with the largest segment of people in 14 countries _ including the U.S. _ saying so.

Andrew Kohut, president of Pew, said many seem to be hoping the U.S. role in the world will improve with the departure of President Bush, who remains profoundly unpopular almost everywhere.

"People think the U.S. wants to run the world," said Kohut. "It's not more complicated than that."

Countries most hopeful the new president will improve U.S. policies include France, Spain and Germany, where public opposition to Bush's policies in Iraq and elsewhere has been strong. Strong optimism also came from countries where pique with U.S. policies has been less pronounced, including India, Nigeria, Tanzania and South Africa.

Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon have the strongest expectations the next president will worsen U.S. policies, consistent with the skepticism expressed on many issues in the survey by Muslim countries. Japan, Turkey, Russia, South Korea and Mexico had large numbers saying the election would change little.

Among those tracking the American election, greater numbers in 20 countries expressed more confidence in Obama, the likely Democratic nominee, than John McCain, the Republican candidate, to handle world affairs properly. The two contenders were tied in the U.S., Jordan and Pakistan. Obama's edge was largest in Western Europe, Australia, Japan, Tanzania and Indonesia, where he lived for a time as a child.

The U.S. was the only country where most expressed confidence in McCain. Besides the countries where he and Obama were tied, McCain's smallest gaps against his rival were in India and China, where neither man engenders much confidence.

The U.S. is seen as the world's leading economic power by 22 countries in the survey. Yet in 11 countries, more think China will replace the U.S. as the world's dominant superpower or has already done so than predict that will never happen.

At the same time, China's favorable ratings have edged downward since last year, with widespread worry over its military power, pollution and human rights record. The survey was taken during China's crackdown on unrest in Tibet, but before last month's earthquake in China.

The poll also found:

_Sixty percent or more had favorable views of the U.S. in South Korea, Poland, India, Tanzania, Nigeria and South Africa. One in five or fewer had positive impressions in Egypt, Argentina, Jordan, Pakistan and Turkey.

_Nine in 10 in South Korea and Lebanon say their economies are in bad shape, while eight in 10 Chinese, seven in 10 Australians and six in 10 Indians say theirs are strong.

_Hillary Rodham Clinton, who lost the Democratic nomination to Obama, generally was rated higher than McCain overseas but lower than Obama.

_There is growing pessimism that a stable democratic government will take hold in Iraq, with majorities only in Nigeria, India and Tanzania predicting success.

_Only in the U.S., Britain and Australia do most want U.S. and NATO forces to say in Afghanistan.

_Iran is viewed mostly negatively. Even the eight countries in the survey with large Muslim populations have mixed views. In six of those eight, Muslims oppose Iran getting nuclear weapons.

The polling was conducted from March 17-April 21, mostly in April, interviewing adults face to face in 17 countries and by telephone in the remaining seven. Local languages were used.

The number interviewed in each country ranged from 700 in Australia to 3,212 in China. All samples were national except for China, Pakistan, India and Brazil, where the samples were mostly urban. The margins of sampling error were plus or minus 3 percentage points or 4 points in every country but China and India, where it was 2 points.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/06/13/o...i_n_106887.html

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Ukraine
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Who gives a damn what the rest of the world thinks, there is only one number at the top of the list that matters and that is in the USA - McCain 60% v. Ovomit 59%, get used to it, McCain is going to win in 08! :yes:

NYOL58806130154.jpg

WASHINGTON — People around the globe widely expect the next American president to improve the country's policies toward the rest of the world, especially if Barack Obama is elected, yet they retain a persistently poor image of the U.S., according to a poll released Thursday.

The survey of two dozen countries, conducted this spring by the nonpartisan Pew Research Center, also found a growing despondency over the international economy, with majorities in 18 nations calling domestic economic conditions poor. In more bad news for the U.S., people shared a widespread sense the American economy was hurting their countries, including large majorities in U.S. allies Britain, Germany, Australia, Turkey, France and Japan.

Even six in 10 Americans agreed the U.S. economy was having a negative impact abroad.

Views of the U.S. improved or stayed the same as last year in 18 nations, the first positive signs the poll has found for the U.S. image worldwide this decade. Even so, many improvements were modest and the U.S. remains less popular in most countries than it was before it invaded Iraq in 2003, with majorities in only eight expressing favorable opinions.

Substantial numbers in most countries said they are closely following the U.S. presidential election, including 83 percent in Japan _ about the same proportion who said so in the U.S. Of those following the campaign, optimism that the new president will reshape American foreign policy for the better is substantial, with the largest segment of people in 14 countries _ including the U.S. _ saying so.

Andrew Kohut, president of Pew, said many seem to be hoping the U.S. role in the world will improve with the departure of President Bush, who remains profoundly unpopular almost everywhere.

"People think the U.S. wants to run the world," said Kohut. "It's not more complicated than that."

Countries most hopeful the new president will improve U.S. policies include France, Spain and Germany, where public opposition to Bush's policies in Iraq and elsewhere has been strong. Strong optimism also came from countries where pique with U.S. policies has been less pronounced, including India, Nigeria, Tanzania and South Africa.

Egypt, Jordan and Lebanon have the strongest expectations the next president will worsen U.S. policies, consistent with the skepticism expressed on many issues in the survey by Muslim countries. Japan, Turkey, Russia, South Korea and Mexico had large numbers saying the election would change little.

Among those tracking the American election, greater numbers in 20 countries expressed more confidence in Obama, the likely Democratic nominee, than John McCain, the Republican candidate, to handle world affairs properly. The two contenders were tied in the U.S., Jordan and Pakistan. Obama's edge was largest in Western Europe, Australia, Japan, Tanzania and Indonesia, where he lived for a time as a child.

The U.S. was the only country where most expressed confidence in McCain. Besides the countries where he and Obama were tied, McCain's smallest gaps against his rival were in India and China, where neither man engenders much confidence.

The U.S. is seen as the world's leading economic power by 22 countries in the survey. Yet in 11 countries, more think China will replace the U.S. as the world's dominant superpower or has already done so than predict that will never happen.

At the same time, China's favorable ratings have edged downward since last year, with widespread worry over its military power, pollution and human rights record. The survey was taken during China's crackdown on unrest in Tibet, but before last month's earthquake in China.

The poll also found:

_Sixty percent or more had favorable views of the U.S. in South Korea, Poland, India, Tanzania, Nigeria and South Africa. One in five or fewer had positive impressions in Egypt, Argentina, Jordan, Pakistan and Turkey.

_Nine in 10 in South Korea and Lebanon say their economies are in bad shape, while eight in 10 Chinese, seven in 10 Australians and six in 10 Indians say theirs are strong.

_Hillary Rodham Clinton, who lost the Democratic nomination to Obama, generally was rated higher than McCain overseas but lower than Obama.

_There is growing pessimism that a stable democratic government will take hold in Iraq, with majorities only in Nigeria, India and Tanzania predicting success.

_Only in the U.S., Britain and Australia do most want U.S. and NATO forces to say in Afghanistan.

_Iran is viewed mostly negatively. Even the eight countries in the survey with large Muslim populations have mixed views. In six of those eight, Muslims oppose Iran getting nuclear weapons.

The polling was conducted from March 17-April 21, mostly in April, interviewing adults face to face in 17 countries and by telephone in the remaining seven. Local languages were used.

The number interviewed in each country ranged from 700 in Australia to 3,212 in China. All samples were national except for China, Pakistan, India and Brazil, where the samples were mostly urban. The margins of sampling error were plus or minus 3 percentage points or 4 points in every country but China and India, where it was 2 points.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/06/13/o...i_n_106887.html

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Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Philippines
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Who cares? The only "poll" that matters is the one on election day when registered American voters cast their ballots.


David & Lalai

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Filed: Other Country: United Kingdom
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I would have thought it obvious that this illustrates, at least to some degree, that the Republican party is somewhat out of touch with the rest of the world. Who knows... perhaps its fallout from "The Bush Effect".

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I would have thought it obvious that this illustrates, at least to some degree, that the Republican party is somewhat out of touch with the rest of the world. Who knows... perhaps its fallout from "The Bush Effect".

Fortunately for *them*, they could care less the impact their actions have on the rest of the world. Even if it means creating more anti-Americanism later on.


Wishing you ten-fold that which you wish upon all others.

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You missed a few others that endorse him also. Hey, since you want to bring up people that can't vote just make sure you list them all.

More terrorists endorse Obama

Leading jihadists sound off about presidential candidate in new book

Posted: May 15, 2008

12:00 am Eastern

© 2008 WorldNetDaily

Hamas isn't the only terrorist organization that endorsed Sen. Barack Obama in the 2008 race for the presidency of the U.S.

Leading jihadists from multiple other terror groups also recently sounded off about the Illinois senator and a slew of other topics in a blockbuster book – Schmoozing With Terrorists – which takes readers into the viper's den of Islamic extremism.

WND's Jerusalem bureau chief Aaron Klein made world headlines last month after a top Hamas official, Ahmed Yousef, told him he "hopes" Obama becomes president and compared the Illinois senator to President John F. Kennedy.

"We like Mr. Obama, and we hope that he will win the elections," said Yousef.

"I hope Mr. Obama and the Democrats will change the political discourse. ... I do believe [Obama] is like John Kennedy, a great man with a great principle. And he has a vision to change America to make it in a position to lead the world community, but not with humiliation and arrogance," Yousef said, speaking from Gaza to Klein and WABC Radio's John Batchelor.

Find out what other leading jihadists had to say about Obama in Klein's Schmoozing with Terrorists," in which a Jewish reporter meets his sworn enemies.

The Jerusalem Post stated in a recent review of "Schmoozing": "For those under the sway of the Western media, many of the frank (proud, even) revelations, motivations and goals offered by Klein's subjects will come as a very rude awakening."

"Most of the book's attraction is to be found in the very spectacle of a single Jew – albeit accompanied by an intrepid interpreter – arranging to be totally alone and at the mercy of armed killers who want nothing more than to see him and all his people dead. It's like watching a mouse interviewing a series of snakes.

"And perhaps that very novelty explains why Klein is still alive, and why so often his subjects dropped many of the polished lies and half truths they usually feed the media," wrote the Jerusalem Post.

The American Thinker hailed "Schmoozing" as "enlightening and highly readable."

"Klein's conversations covered the gamut from why Hamas, Islamic Jihad, and Fatah's al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades endorse the use of homicide bombing in light of the Quranic ban on suicide; to the way in which the terrorist leaders nakedly reject documented archeological and historical connections between Jews and Israel; to the ongoing persecution of Christians by Muslims in Bethlehem, Gaza and other cities," reported American Thinker.

"Klein's style is conversational and personal: he never hides his own perspective or the fact that he is an Orthodox Jew (albeit the brawny, deeply-tanned 20-something year old pictured on the book jacket inside cover does not fit the typical stereotype in this country).

"And yet those whom he interviews, although occasionally bridling at some of Klein's questions, are perfectly comfortable meeting with him and articulating their views and goals."

http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=...mp;pageId=64306

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Filed: Country: Philippines
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I would have thought it obvious that this illustrates, at least to some degree, that the Republican party is somewhat out of touch with the rest of the world. Who knows... perhaps its fallout from "The Bush Effect".

Fortunately for *them*, they could care less the impact their actions have on the rest of the world. Even if it means creating more anti-Americanism later on.

Apparently for some, the only 'outside' opinion that matters to them are the terrorists, cuz for the last two elections they've marched that parade out each time, saying that terrorists want a Democrat in the White House. Oh the irony. :jest:

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In fairness - the attitude toward Obama probably has to do more with general perceptions - in much the same way that a lot of USC's couldn't get enough of Tony Blair. It probably isn't really about any actual poltiical issues - and more to do with perceptions of the candidate's personality.

I would have thought it obvious that this illustrates, at least to some degree, that the Republican party is somewhat out of touch with the rest of the world. Who knows... perhaps its fallout from "The Bush Effect".

Fortunately for *them*, they could care less the impact their actions have on the rest of the world. Even if it means creating more anti-Americanism later on.

Apparently for some, the only 'outside' opinion that matters to them are the terrorists, cuz for the last two elections they've marched that parade out each time, saying that terrorists want a Democrat in the White House. Oh the irony. :jest:

Yeah that is a bit silly.

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obama wins support from terrorists. i wonder why.


* ~ * Charles * ~ *
 

I carry a gun because a cop is too heavy.

 

USE THE REPORT BUTTON INSTEAD OF MESSAGING A MODERATOR!

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obama wins support from terrorists. i wonder why.

Obama wins overwhelming support from Germans too. Hmmm, could there be a connection there? <gets out conspiracy handbook> :reading:

first we take manhatten, and then we take berlin!


* ~ * Charles * ~ *
 

I carry a gun because a cop is too heavy.

 

USE THE REPORT BUTTON INSTEAD OF MESSAGING A MODERATOR!

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obama wins support from terrorists. i wonder why.

Obama wins overwhelming support from Germans too. Hmmm, could there be a connection there? <gets out conspiracy handbook> :reading:

first we take manhatten, and then we take berlin!

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