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How did you enter the working world once approved with EAD?

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I just received my EAD a couple of weeks ago and am on the search for a decent job. I have a good career spanning over 14 years and experience of working in a few countries. I have been told that as I am new to the US, it will be impossible for me to find work at the level of responsibility and pay that I am used to. My first degree is from the United States and my post graduate diploma is from my home country. My husband is suggesting that I start with a minimum wage/entry level job and work my way up. I have an advanced degree and have worked at the level of General Manager, Project Manager, Program Coordinator etc.

My questions would be:

1) how difficult was it to translate work experience in your own countries to working in the U.S?

2) Was it difficult to find work in your field of experience?

3) Will it hurt or help if I apply for immediate entry level jobs (just to be able to work) rather than spend full time job seeking a management level position?

Any thoughts, experiences or advice would be much appreciated!

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Moved from Adjustment of Status from Family Based Visas forum to Finding Work in America forum.


Our journey:

Spoiler

September 2007: Met online via social networking site (MySpace); began exchanging messages.
March 26, 2009: We become a couple!
September 10, 2009: Arrived for first meeting in-person!
June 17, 2010: Arrived for second in-person meeting and start of travel together to other areas of China!
June 21, 2010: Engaged!!!
September 1, 2010: Switched course from K1 to CR-1
December 8, 2010: Wedding date set; it will be on February 18, 2011!
February 9, 2011: Depart for China
February 11, 2011: Registered for marriage in Wuhan, officially married!!!
February 18, 2011: Wedding ceremony in Shiyan!!!
April 22, 2011: Mailed I-130 to Chicago
April 28, 2011: Received NOA1 via text/email, file routed to CSC (priority date April 25th)
April 29, 2011: Updated
May 3, 2011: Received NOA1 hardcopy in mail
July 26, 2011: Received NOA2 via text/email!!!
July 30, 2011: Received NOA2 hardcopy in mail
August 8, 2011: NVC received file
September 1, 2011: NVC case number assigned
September 2, 2011: AOS invoice received, OPTIN email for EP sent
September 7, 2011: Paid AOS bill (payment portal showed PAID on September 9, 2011)
September 8, 2011: OPTIN email accepted, GZO number assigned
September 10, 2011: Emailed AOS package
September 12, 2011: IV bill invoiced
September 13, 2011: Paid IV bill (payment portal showed PAID on September 14, 2011)
September 14, 2011: Emailed IV package
October 3, 2011: Emailed checklist response (checklist generated due to typo on Form DS-230)
October 6, 2011: Case complete at NVC
November 10, 2011: Interview - APPROVED!!!
December 7, 2011: POE - Sea-Tac Airport

September 17, 2013: Mailed I-751 to CSC

September 23, 2013: Received NOA1 in mail (receipt date September 19th)

October 16, 2013: Biometrics Appointment

January 28, 2014: Production of new Green Card ordered

February 3, 2014: New Green Card received; done with USCIS until fall of 2023*

 

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I just received my EAD a couple of weeks ago and am on the search for a decent job. I have a good career spanning over 14 years and experience of working in a few countries. I have been told that as I am new to the US, it will be impossible for me to find work at the level of responsibility and pay that I am used to. My first degree is from the United States and my post graduate diploma is from my home country. My husband is suggesting that I start with a minimum wage/entry level job and work my way up. I have an advanced degree and have worked at the level of General Manager, Project Manager, Program Coordinator etc.

My questions would be:

1) how difficult was it to translate work experience in your own countries to working in the U.S?

2) Was it difficult to find work in your field of experience?

3) Will it hurt or help if I apply for immediate entry level jobs (just to be able to work) rather than spend full time job seeking a management level position?

Any thoughts, experiences or advice would be much appreciated!

With your level of English I wouldn't exactly start washing dishes.

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I think having your first degree from the U.S. is a plus...International experience shows that you're versatile and your English is good. I would seek an entry level job just to keep busy, but keep applying for jobs that are more suited to your experience. What degree do you have? Just curious..

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May I also suggest that you create, or change your Linkedin (professional) profile to show that you are in the States. Also subscribe to beyond.com and similar job sites. There is a new type of recruiter who uses Social Media to recruit you, and without a profile you do not exist.

I talked with numerous agencies and researched jobs in and around our area using the job adverts sent in the email each day. It gives you a good idea of what companies are in your area, who recruits regularly, and the levels of qualifications in your field that are being looked for.

For example in my field, I shall be using the three month enforced 'break' to learn PERL and Spanish better as that is more of a requirement in the States for my type of job.

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General Manager, Project Manager, Program Coordinator...those are big titles
but those qualitative descriptions doesn't provide measurable numbers that people can

clearly correlate to.

What will really matter are the quantitative side of your experience that they can relate to...for example...

1) Number of direct subordinates or project team members managed

2) Amount of responsible annual budget or project budget

3) Achievements...like...by doing "this and that"...saved company x millions of dollars,

or increased product/service sales by 30%, etc...

In other words, there is a huge difference in General Manager of few people vs. 100+.


10-04-2013 We met online
11-21-2013 We met in person in Shanghai for 2 weeks

12-13-2013 I-129F packet sent via express

12-19-2013 USCIS NOA #1 (text and email) received

12-24-2013 USCIS assigns Alien Registration Number
12-31-2013 USCIS NOA #1 hard copy received
06-02-2014 USCIS web site shows NOA #2 approval
06-06-2014 USCIS web site shows case sent to NVC

06-xx-2014 Fiancee acquired birth, marriage, and police certificates from local police station (wrong)

06-16-2014 NVC creates case with GUZ### number

06-19-2014 NVC sends case sent to Guangzhou, China
06-24-2014 Received packet 3 express mail from embassy
06-25-2014 Completed DS-160 and paid K1 visa fee

06-26-2014 Mailed packet 3 response back to Embassy

06-26-2014 Requested police certificate from Russian embassy

07-08-2014 Received packet 4 email from Embassy

07-17-2014 Picked up Russian police certificate

07-25-2014 Fiancee medical exam (received MMR & Varicella, but they missed required TD shot)

07-31-2014 Picked up medical exam reports

08-01-2014 Request (correct) birth, marriage, and police certificates from Notarial Service (GongZhengChu)

08-06-2014 Picked up birth, marriage, and police certificates from Notarial Service

08-14-2014 Passed Interview Guangzhou embassy

09-01-2014 Received passport, visa, & sealed envelope

09-13-2014 POE

09-17-2014 Went to CBP office to get (US entry) I-94 updated correctly

09-18-2014 Applied for Social Security Card
09-19-2014 Applied for Marriage License (via online)
09-25-2014 Received Social Security Card
09-30-2014 Picked up Marriage License
10-09-2014 Marriage by Justice of Peace
10-09-2014 Got Certified Marriage Certificate Copies
10-17-2014 Received a letter from SS office that they need the marriage license
10-09-2014 Applied to change the social security card name
10-24-2014 Went back to SS office to provide the marriage certificate documents again!!!
12-09-2014 Submitted AOS, EAD, and AP
12-16-2014 Received 16 emails and 16 text NOA messages
01-05-2015 Received Biometrics appointment letter for (01-12-2015)
01-12-2015 Had Biometrics (fingerprint & picture) - Required Marriage Certificate!!!
02-17-2015 EAD and AP is approved
02-23-2015 Received AP is approval letter
02-25-2015 Received EAD/AP combo card (expires 02/16/2016)
02-27-2015 Applied for SS card name change (they took her SS card)
02-27-2015 Driver's learner permit test was denied since the SS card was given to SS office for name change
03-17-2015 Received SS card with married name
03-17-2015 Started to change all her accounts to married name
03-23-2015 Received potential interview waiver letter
03-27-2015 DMV rejects learner's permit due to "legal status=pending" and vision test failure
04-05-2015 Vision test for learner's permit
04-06-2015 DPS sent us letter that DHS cleared my wife's status to acquire driver's license.
04-10-2015 Passed Driver Learner's Permit
04-22-2015 Received Driver Learner's Permit ID card (expires 02/16/2016)
08-27-2015 Green Card approved
08-31-2015 Received Green Card "Welcome Notice Was Mailed" letter
09-05-2015 Received Green card
10-26-2015 Passed Driver's License Road Test (on 3rd attempt)
11-03-2015 Received Driver's License (expires 02/16/2022)
11-06-2015 Applied to remove conditional work remark on SS card
11-23-2015 Received updated Social Security Card.
- - - - - - - - - - Pending Future Processing - - - - - - - - - -
05-27-2017 File 10 Year Green Card
08-27-2017 2 Year Green Card Expires
05-27-2018 File USC

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I just received my EAD a couple of weeks ago and am on the search for a decent job. I have a good career spanning over 14 years and experience of working in a few countries. I have been told that as I am new to the US, it will be impossible for me to find work at the level of responsibility and pay that I am used to. My first degree is from the United States and my post graduate diploma is from my home country. My husband is suggesting that I start with a minimum wage/entry level job and work my way up. I have an advanced degree and have worked at the level of General Manager, Project Manager, Program Coordinator etc.

My questions would be:

1) how difficult was it to translate work experience in your own countries to working in the U.S?

2) Was it difficult to find work in your field of experience?

3) Will it hurt or help if I apply for immediate entry level jobs (just to be able to work) rather than spend full time job seeking a management level position?

Any thoughts, experiences or advice would be much appreciated!

You would be foolish wasting your time at a minimum wage job when you need to be looking for a job that fits your skills and payrate.........

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May I also suggest that you create, or change your Linkedin (professional) profile to show that you are in the States. Also subscribe to beyond.com and similar job sites. There is a new type of recruiter who uses Social Media to recruit you, and without a profile you do not exist.

I talked with numerous agencies and researched jobs in and around our area using the job adverts sent in the email each day. It gives you a good idea of what companies are in your area, who recruits regularly, and the levels of qualifications in your field that are being looked for.

For example in my field, I shall be using the three month enforced 'break' to learn PERL and Spanish better as that is more of a requirement in the States for my type of jobs

Thanks for the thoughts! I updated Linked in when I arrived and like you, have spent the last 3 months studying and doing certifications in fields that I have some experience and seems relevant to the job market here.

I did not know about beyond.com thanks for the heads up; will check them out. I have signed up as well to Glassdoor and Flexjobs and have been applying through posted opportunities there.

Thanks again for the straightforward response!!

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ke

I think having your first degree from the U.S. is a plus...International experience shows that you're versatile and your English is good. I would seek an entry level job just to keep busy, but keep applying for jobs that are more suited to your experience. What degree do you have? Just curious..

First degree (Bsc) Economics, Graduate Degree International Relations.... I am thinking it IS better to keep busy and something will come along once I am focussed on applying for relevant jobs.

Thanks for your feedback!

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You should have no problems getting a job in your area. You may have trouble finding one, but that's another story.

My suggestions would be:

1 - Use your free time to get an accreditation. Depending on how long you worked as a project manager you may qualify to sit and take the test to get your PMP certification. That counts a lot if you want to find a job in that area.

2 - Make sure your post grad degree is valid in the US. If it's not check out with colleges in your area if you could get it recognized here.

3 - Write a brand new resume. If you already have a resume, benchmark it against some of the models available online. Make sure your resume looks and feels like a US resume. My first impression of a candidate with a European resume style is that the individual didn't even have the courtesy to adapt it to US standards.

4 - Update your resume constantly as you look for jobs - you will come across jobs with certain requirements that you may have had but not listed on your resume.

5 - One resume for each application - Edit your resume to fit the job you're applying for. If you're looking for a job as a PM, make sure that you provide tons of content for your PM experience and make sure that your resume hits most, if not all, of the requirements for the job, if you have them, to be sure.

6 - Find those hidden feathers and display them prominently in your cap. You mention you have experience working in a few countries. That translates in 'seasoned traveler and ability to communicate across geographical and cultural borders'.

7 - This is America. Don't sell yourself short. Don't be self-effacing. If you make it to the interview, act as though the job is yours; show confidence and again, act the part.

8 - This is America. Be thick skinned. I hope not, but you may have to apply for a number of jobs before you get an interview and land it. Remember to craft a different resume for each application.

Welcome and good luck!

I just received my EAD a couple of weeks ago and am on the search for a decent job. I have a good career spanning over 14 years and experience of working in a few countries. I have been told that as I am new to the US, it will be impossible for me to find work at the level of responsibility and pay that I am used to. My first degree is from the United States and my post graduate diploma is from my home country. My husband is suggesting that I start with a minimum wage/entry level job and work my way up. I have an advanced degree and have worked at the level of General Manager, Project Manager, Program Coordinator etc.

My questions would be:

1) how difficult was it to translate work experience in your own countries to working in the U.S?

2) Was it difficult to find work in your field of experience?

3) Will it hurt or help if I apply for immediate entry level jobs (just to be able to work) rather than spend full time job seeking a management level position?

Any thoughts, experiences or advice would be much appreciated!

Edited by JohnR!

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www.ffrf.org




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It might all depends on the job you are applying for qualifications and skills you have. I have a bachelor's degree that allows me to work as a teacher since my studies are recognized here. However, after one week of receiving my EAD, I got a job at my husband's office where I will have a fixed salary and also make extra money through commission which could potentially be 3,500, 5000, 7000, 9,000 and even more depending on your performance. I got the job because of my communicative skills and the fact that I am bilingual I believe. I still consider working as a teacher because I love that. I think it could be easy for you to get a job since you obtained your degree in the US.

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You should have no problems getting a job in your area. You may have trouble finding one, but that's another story.

My suggestions would be:

1 - Use your free time to get an accreditation. Depending on how long you worked as a project manager you may qualify to sit and take the test to get your PMP certification. That counts a lot if you want to find a job in that area.

2 - Make sure your post grad degree is valid in the US. If it's not check out with colleges in your area if you could get it recognized here.

3 - Write a brand new resume. If you already have a resume, benchmark it against some of the models available online. Make sure your resume looks and feels like a US resume. My first impression of a candidate with a European resume style is that the individual didn't even have the courtesy to adapt it to US standards.

4 - Update your resume constantly as you look for jobs - you will come across jobs with certain requirements that you may have had but not listed on your resume.

5 - One resume for each application - Edit your resume to fit the job you're applying for. If you're looking for a job as a PM, make sure that you provide tons of content for your PM experience and make sure that your resume hits most, if not all, of the requirements for the job, if you have them, to be sure.

6 - Find those hidden feathers and display them prominently in your cap. You mention you have experience working in a few countries. That translates in 'seasoned traveler and ability to communicate across geographical and cultural borders'.

7 - This is America. Don't sell yourself short. Don't be self-effacing. If you make it to the interview, act as though the job is yours; show confidence and again, act the part.

8 - This is America. Be thick skinned. I hope not, but you may have to apply for a number of jobs before you get an interview and land it. Remember to craft a different resume for each application.

Welcome and good luck!

Married to my husband and moved to the USA last year. Learned how to cook first and took a break in life, and I'm now thinking about getting a job (as it's so boring for me to be a housewife). Your post is very helpful to me. Thanks!

Edited by Yilees

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I think applying for an entry-level job is silly, and a waste of time and energy with your credentials. All your previous work experience plus international exposure give you plenty of advantage compared to the average American candidate.

Don't get desperate. Take your time and try to find something that will actually add to your previous experiences. Do not take a step back.

Edited by BRlove

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I just received my EAD a couple of weeks ago and am on the search for a decent job. I have a good career spanning over 14 years and experience of working in a few countries. I have been told that as I am new to the US, it will be impossible for me to find work at the level of responsibility and pay that I am used to. My first degree is from the United States and my post graduate diploma is from my home country. My husband is suggesting that I start with a minimum wage/entry level job and work my way up. I have an advanced degree and have worked at the level of General Manager, Project Manager, Program Coordinator etc.

My questions would be:

1) how difficult was it to translate work experience in your own countries to working in the U.S?

2) Was it difficult to find work in your field of experience?

3) Will it hurt or help if I apply for immediate entry level jobs (just to be able to work) rather than spend full time job seeking a management level position?

Any thoughts, experiences or advice would be much appreciated!

I just posted about a career change... but to answer your questions.

1) It wasn't difficult for me at all. Perhaps Canada and the US are so similar, that my experience was well recognized.

2) No, it wasn't difficult. My previous companies in Canada had US offices, so my network helped me a lot.

3) It really depends on what you want. Have you given yourself enough time to look for a job closer to your experience level? I would try that and if no one bites, then scale back and work your way back up.


AOS

2014

July 05 - AOS package sent

July 14 - NOA 1

July 25 - Biometrics Appointment Letter

July 28 - Walk in Biometrics successful

Aug 27 - Request for Expedite on EAD (Job Offer)

Sept 12 - EAD approved and in production

Sept 12 - AP is approved but USCIS status is in 'Post Decision Activity'

Sept 18 - EAD marked as mailed

2015

April 09 - Interview - Delayed due to sealed package from civil surgeon not at local office

May 07 - GC in production

May 18 - GC in hand!!!

2017

Feb 9 - ROC 

Feb 14 - Check Cashed

Feb 16 - NOA 1

Feb 25 - Received Biometrics Appointment

 

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