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Bayoubrit

Job seeking advice

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Hey everyone, 

I am a mechanical engineer in the oil & gas field with 19 years experience. When i first moved to New Orleans i was applied left right and center. I did find out that here in Louisiana it is who you know as well as what you know, so i decided to look at other jobs that my skills matched. In my field i have had not one response or invitation to interview!

So my question is this: 

Since this is the US and it seems 90% of the world would like to live and work here, does the fact my CV/ resume only has UK company and work experience? Are we going to be fighting against all the internet applications that can be done anywhere in the world? Now i am thinking i am going to start sending a copy of my green card or welcome letter attached to prove i can work here. Now i know that resume rules or norms says you dont include that information but i almost feel i am being put into the ' another UK guy wants us to sponsor a Visa to work here' category. 

 

Thanks,

 

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the green card and welcome letter will hurt you more than help since it proves you are a foreigner instead of having them make that guess with your work experience. there is a part of every application I have seen that asks if you are authorized to work in the us and if you will require sponsorship in the future. this is the question that sets you apart from the Internet ones.

 

have you had your degree equivalency done?

 

how long have you been looking for work since November and December is a slow time for hiring.

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Right now hiring in oil & gas would be slow based on the low prices. Not sure if you are totally committed to Louisiana but have you tried widening your search to include Texas; I believe your chances would be better there. Also is your resume in the "US" format? apparently HR in the US prefer 1 page (2 pages max) resumes.

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On ‎1‎/‎15‎/‎2017 at 3:05 PM, Bayoubrit said:

Hey everyone, 

I am a mechanical engineer in the oil & gas field with 19 years experience. When i first moved to New Orleans i was applied left right and center. I did find out that here in Louisiana it is who you know as well as what you know, so i decided to look at other jobs that my skills matched. In my field i have had not one response or invitation to interview!

So my question is this: 

Since this is the US and it seems 90% of the world would like to live and work here, does the fact my CV/ resume only has UK company and work experience? Are we going to be fighting against all the internet applications that can be done anywhere in the world? Now i am thinking i am going to start sending a copy of my green card or welcome letter attached to prove i can work here. Now i know that resume rules or norms says you dont include that information but i almost feel i am being put into the ' another UK guy wants us to sponsor a Visa to work here' category. 

 

Thanks,

 

Things you need to think about

 

1) Have you tailored your resume into a one-page American style format and a single cover letter? Use key buzzwords and make each resume you send in unique and specific to the company you're trying to match it to.

2) There is no need to attach welcome letters or green cards. You can put on your resume or letter that you are an LPR and you are authorized to work without sponsorship. Even if you put this, don't expect bites to come right away. It took a very long time for my husband to find a job in his field. He is well overqualified for that job, but he took what he could get.

3) Things that count against you are indeed no US work experience. You are an immigrant and will have to fight twice as hard to get a space amongst the piles of tardy HR staff looking for the next best person.

4) Be prepared for the fact that you may need to switch fields entirely or get yourself a job that is only good for establishing US work experience.

5) Look at recruitment agencies and consider LinkedIn.


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Also consider getting qualifications in the US that may help you for the jobs you are applying for.  IE: cdl, cpr and first aid, etc...


You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.  - Dr. Seuss

 

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12 minutes ago, yuna628 said:

Things you need to think about

 

1) Have you tailored your resume into a one-page American style format and a single cover letter? Use key buzzwords and make each resume you send in unique and specific to the company you're trying to match it to.

2) There is no need to attach welcome letters or green cards. You can put on your resume or letter that you are an LPR and you are authorized to work without sponsorship. Even if you put this, don't expect bites to come right away. It took a very long time for my husband to find a job in his field. He is well overqualified for that job, but he took what he could get.

3) Things that count against you are indeed no US work experience. You are an immigrant and will have to fight twice as hard to get a space amongst the piles of tardy HR staff looking for the next best person.

4) Be prepared for the fact that you may need to switch fields entirely or get yourself a job that is only good for establishing US work experience.

5) Look at recruitment agencies and consider LinkedIn.

1) - I have done the Resume, checked the UK to US English spelling, got an American in engineering to proof read the Resume. 

2) - I realize there is no need but was wondering if it would give them the proof to take the application seriously.

3) - Amen brother! 

4) - This is a big one, I expanded my job type hugely just to start the journey into US experience. The idea is to work and do community college courses to get the US qualifications. 

 

9 minutes ago, NikLR said:

Also consider getting qualifications in the US that may help you for the jobs you are applying for.  IE: cdl, cpr and first aid, etc...

Thank you to both for the answers, sometimes you want to hear advice from like situation people to get your thinking straight!!

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Honestly don't include your green card.  That's really sensitive information.  In the wrong hands your identity could easily be stolen. Mention you have it if you get a call or an interview if they ask. Provide it with an I-9. 

If you're in a specialized career and dont want to expand, then you may take longer to find a job than someone in retail or food industry.  After leaving the Air Force it took my husband almost a year to get his job with the FAA.  He was really picky about what he wanted to do.  Really, it was to the point where he was about to move to Canada when he was informed he had gotten the job.  


You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.  - Dr. Seuss

 

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1 minute ago, NikLR said:

Honestly don't include your green card.  That's really sensitive information.  In the wrong hands your identity could easily be stolen. Mention you have it if you get a call or an interview if they ask. Provide it with an I-9. 

If you're in a specialized career and dont want to expand, then you may take longer to find a job than someone in retail or food industry.  After leaving the Air Force it took my husband almost a year to get his job with the FAA.  He was really picky about what he wanted to do.  Really, it was to the point where he was about to move to Canada when he was informed he had gotten the job.  

That is so true, that had not even crossed my mind! 

I have already decided that stressing and complaining is not going to solve anything. So i am going to look for something related to my field but keep looking once i have something. The old saying it is easy to find a job when you have a job rings true. 

Thank you for pointing that out, i forgot what information that card will have on it!

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My families been in the oil industry since before I was born. Right now it's down. Within the last couple of years mass layoff's happened and it's slowly starting to pick back up, but it's not there yet.

Look for the big companies right now. My dad had wonderful experiences with National Oilwell Varco for years until they sold their part distribution section to another company, but as you wouldn't be in rig part distribution, they may have something for you.


But yes, networking is HUGE in the oil field. My dad had been in the business since he was 19 (so early 70s) and got out in the crash in 98, he was out for almost 10 years when he put in his resume into a system that I guess a lot of employers check when looking to hire SPECIFICALLY in the oil field. From what he says, one of his old friends/work partner saw his resume hit and told his boss that they needed him and that he knew him from international sales in the 90s.

My dad was then hired on the spot for store manager, and then within 2 years was managing the managers in international sales in two regions in the middle east, then Australia and PI until the company sold the distribution portion (he was rig parts sales), the company that bought out that section ended up bringing him back to the states, told him he would run a store, and then promptly laid him off while his stuff was still in Australia. 

With all that said though, he's looking back into the oil field, it's been a couple of years since the mass lay offs and he feels it's picking back up enough to where it was when he originally put in his resume 10+ years ago that got him his international job.


I also do recommend getting your foot in the field, but not necessarily your dream job/job that matches your skills. You -CAN- move up in the oil field as I'm sure you know, you just need your foot in the door because knowing people really can bump you up high places in this business.

You will find that A LOT of rig work happens in Texas. Here's this place if you haven't seen it, but I'm sure you have. http://www.rigzone.com/oil/jobs/categories/oilfield-services-8/

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1 minute ago, Ash.1101 said:

My families been in the oil industry since before I was born. Right now it's down. Within the last couple of years mass layoff's happened and it's slowly starting to pick back up, but it's not there yet.

Look for the big companies right now. My dad had wonderful experiences with National Oilwell Varco for years until they sold their part distribution section to another company, but as you wouldn't be in rig part distribution, they may have something for you.


But yes, networking is HUGE in the oil field. My dad had been in the business since he was 19 (so early 70s) and got out in the crash in 98, he was out for almost 10 years when he put in his resume into a system that I guess a lot of employers check when looking to hire SPECIFICALLY in the oil field. From what he says, one of his old friends/work partner saw his resume hit and told his boss that they needed him and that he knew him from international sales in the 90s.

My dad was then hired on the spot for store manager, and then within 2 years was managing international sales in two regions in the middle east, then Australia and PI until the company sold the distribution portion (he was rig parts sales), the company that bought out that section ended up bringing him back to the states, told him he would run a store, and then promptly laid him off while his stuff was still in Australia. 

With all that said though, he's looking back into the oil field, it's been a couple of years since the mass lay offs and he feels it's picking back up enough to where it was when he originally put in his resume 10+ years ago that got him his international job.


I also do recommend getting your foot in the field, but not necessarily your dream job/job that matches your skills. You -CAN- move up in the oil field as I'm sure you know, you just need your foot in the door because knowing people really can bump you up high places in this business.

You will find that A LOT of rig work happens in Texas. Here's this place if you haven't seen it, but I'm sure you have. http://www.rigzone.com/oil/jobs/categories/oilfield-services-8/

Thanks Ash 1101, 

The reason why i am in the USA now is because i was laid off from oil and gas.... The southern states as you said it is who you know along side what you know. I have thought long and hard and maybe the move to the US should be a new chapter and new experiences. So i have started since jan 10th to look at anything i have the skills for and think i would enjoy. At a later date once i have been here a year as a residence of NOLA then i could always look at going back to do a qualification. Unfortunately a move out of the state is a no go, i promised my wife she could move back home and New Orleans is her home. So its time for me to adapt and be happy!

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I work for a large independent in Houston. We have hardly hired in 2 and a half years and the jobs we have posted now are all West Texas.

 

Have you looked at offshore rig jobs? You may have to start at a lower level than you want, but you can move up as you get experience here.

 

I second the idea of getting some certifications to boost your resume. 

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