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timhber

Petition Parents and Brother

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Hi,

My wife is an U.S citizen. My wife's brother lives in Vietnam and he is Not married. Her brother wants to come and work in the U.S and probably wants to live in the U.S permanently. We are looking for the fastest route. Here are our plans. Please let us know if this possible.

1.) First, my wife will petition for her mother and father to come to the U.S. (How long does this process takes?)

2.) After her parents receive their green cards, then they could petition her brother so he could comes to the U.S. (How long does this process takes?)

Thanks,

Tim

Edited by timhber

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1. About a year

2. About 8 years, or 7 years if the parents become US citizens in the meantime and upgrade the petition.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

mod penguin.jpg

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1. About a year

2. About 8 years, or 7 years if the parents become US citizens in the meantime and upgrade the petition.

BTW, he is single.

I do know that the parents have to be U.S citizen before they can petition their children if their children are married and over 21. So it will probably takes at least about 7-8 years.

Wow, I did not know it takes 8 years for parents to petition an unmarried son or daugther. I thought it would not take that long because the parents do not need to wait for 5 years and to become U.S citizen. I read some where that the parents do not have to be an U.S citizen to petition an unmarried son or daughter. I thought they can do it right away when they enter the U.S and receive a green card.

Edited by timhber

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Wow, I did not know it takes 8 years for parents to petition an unmarried son or daugther. I thought it would not take that long because the parents do not need to wait for 5 years and to become U.S citizen. I read some where that the parents do not have to be an U.S citizen to petition an unmarried son or daughter. I thought they can do it right away when they enter the U.S and receive a green card.

They can petition him right away, but there is a waitinglist, and he will need to wait until his priority date comes up. You can see the current priority dates here: http://travel.state.gov/visa/bulletin/bulletin_5927.html


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

mod penguin.jpg

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Not going to happen.

The F4 family preference category (sibling of a US citizen) is about to be eliminated entirely and the F3 family preference category will be limited to age 31 or younger. What they are trying to do is limit chain immigration, so basically exactly what your wife wants to do.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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