Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
steviem

Tax Return - No Income

18 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

How does a new permanent resident (approved on December 31st 2012, approval letter not received yet) with no income or employment at any point during their time in the US go about filing a tax return?

The only money I have received while residing in the US was wedding gifts totaling no more than $2k which were paid into my UK bank account.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does a new permanent resident (approved on December 31st 2012, approval letter not received yet) with no income or employment at any point during their time in the US go about filing a tax return?

The only money I have received while residing in the US was wedding gifts totaling no more than $2k which were paid into my UK bank account.

you still file your return; you will not pay any taxes of course. It is somewhat common for people who do not make enough to be taxed not to file; for residents is same, but you will need tax returns when you file for citizenship, so even if no taxes are due, you might want to file. Declare only what you've got, it does not matter whether you have a job or not. Also, note that we get taxed on worldwide income.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you still file your return; you will not pay any taxes of course. It is somewhat common for people who do not make enough to be taxed not to file; for residents is same, but you will need tax returns when you file for citizenship, so even if no taxes are due, you might want to file. Declare only what you've got, it does not matter whether you have a job or not. Also, note that we get taxed on worldwide income.

Okiedoke. :)

So if we file a joint tax return, we just add my details and obviously no income from myself?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does a new permanent resident (approved on December 31st 2012, approval letter not received yet) with no income or employment at any point during their time in the US go about filing a tax return?

The only money I have received while residing in the US was wedding gifts totaling no more than $2k which were paid into my UK bank account.

http://www.irs.gov/uac/Do-I-have-to-File-a-Tax-Return%3F

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

did you marry a USCitizen?

if so, get a SSN soonish(8 ) , then

file with yer USCitizen spouse, one return on two people.

Good Luck !

8 - take yer EAD card and passport, walk into the local SSA office, apply for a SSN.

Edited by Darnell

Sometimes my language usage seems confusing - please feel free to 'read it twice', just in case !
Ya know, you can find the answer to your question with the advanced search tool, when using a PC? Ditch the handphone, come back later on a PC, and try again.

-=-=-=-=-=R E A D ! ! !=-=-=-=-=-

Whoa Nelly ! Want NVC Info? see http://www.visajourney.com/wiki/index.php/NVC_Process

Congratulations on your approval ! We All Applaud your accomplishment with Most Wonderful Kissies !

2mzcunl.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are taxes required now for Naturalization?

The world-wide income thing is a myth. You are exempted if you are a permanent resident or if you make $90,000 or less.

Bad advice. You still have to file the forms to get that exemption. Permanent residents have to show their worldwide income.

Yes, and it has been that way for years - you must be current with all your tax filings, and either be current with all your taxes, or enter an installment agreement with the IRS with the intention to do so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are taxes required now for Naturalization?

The world-wide income thing is a myth. You are exempted if you are a permanent resident or if you make $90,000 or less.

Not, it is NOT paying taxes, is the filing of a return what I'm talking about. Filing a return does not equate to paying taxes, two different but related matters.

As for exceptions for being resident in another country, it depends on what country is involved, I am not a tax expert nor have experience with Philippines; but I have been resident in other countries and sometimes those exceptions applied and sometimes they did not. It is true that there is a ceiling when resident in another country and are there double taxation treaties with many countries (so one does not pay taxes in 2 countries for the same income) etc. But I digress...

What happens is that for practical purposes, if you don't have to pay taxes (because of low income, resident in other country or whatever), if you don't file, IRS will not go look for you, but many immigration benefits require a tax transcript/return, again is not about paying taxes, it is about filing a return; both things often get assumed to be same. The IRS guys are concerned only about whether you need to pay/file or not, but they can't speak on the immigration aspects.

Edited by Gosia & Tito

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The IRS disagrees with you. They told me since I was a permanent resident in the Philippines, I didn't need to file.

And that I got, it was $80,000 at the time. I believe it's gone up to about $90,000.

Where does the USCIS say that taxes are required? Been looking. Can you post a link please?

Are you a USC? Then you need to file and report worldwide income. Are you a US Permanent Resident? The same applies to you.

Don't confuse your status with a foreign country with your status as far as the IRS is concerned, or the USCIS for future filings.

http://www.uscis.gov/files/article/attachments.pdf

Note: The need to provide tax transcripts to prove compliance is only required if you are filing based on three year marriage to a USC. However, you must still answer the questions in Part 10 of the form: http://www.uscis.gov/files/form/n-400.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The IRS told me that emigrants need not file. It's also on their site somewhere. I believe that it also qualifies you if you have been abroad over a year, without immigrant status.

Guess I'll have to find you the IRS link somewhere when I have time. But that old urban legend is far from true. I wasn't a US Citizen earning income abroad. I was an immigrant from America and then a dual citizen. There are different rules for emigrants and permanent residents.

I don't know why you continue to post misinformation here, and in other threads.

If you are a U.S. citizen or resident alien, the rules for filing income, estate, and gift tax returns and paying estimated tax are generally the same whether you are in the United States or abroad. Your worldwide income is subject to U.S. income tax, regardless of where you reside.

http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/International-Taxpayers/U.S.-Citizens-and-Resident-Aliens-Abroad

Edited by The Patriot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does a new permanent resident (approved on December 31st 2012, approval letter not received yet) with no income or employment at any point during their time in the US go about filing a tax return?

The only money I have received while residing in the US was wedding gifts totaling no more than $2k which were paid into my UK bank account.

This is a special 'ONE YEAR FOR FUN' for the USCitizen Spouse that married you.

Read On, Oh Faithful Reader !

Now you and your spouse qualify for filing 'married filing jointly' on yer income tax returns. Yay !

Did you get your SSN with the local SSA office, or no? Here's my helpful how-to - in case you need it:

http://www.visajourney.com/forums/topic/405546-ssn-howto/

So, if no SSN yet, wait until you get one, before filing yer JOINT tax return.

Your USCitizen Spouse can file 'married filing jointly' on ONE tax return - you will be showing 0 income - as you have no W-2 income at all. Disregard the wedding gifts, in toto, aye?

and that's it ! No Fuss, no muss - the TWO OF YOU file ONE Tax Return, together.

Welcome to America ! IRS Tax forms is FUN!

Edited by Darnell

Sometimes my language usage seems confusing - please feel free to 'read it twice', just in case !
Ya know, you can find the answer to your question with the advanced search tool, when using a PC? Ditch the handphone, come back later on a PC, and try again.

-=-=-=-=-=R E A D ! ! !=-=-=-=-=-

Whoa Nelly ! Want NVC Info? see http://www.visajourney.com/wiki/index.php/NVC_Process

Congratulations on your approval ! We All Applaud your accomplishment with Most Wonderful Kissies !

2mzcunl.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The link you posted says that taxes ARE NOT required. Read again Part 4 of the M-477(a form which is not, for some reason even on the USCIS page about naturalization):

We have bank accounts, leases, and birth certificates of children. We are triple qualified on that and still do not need taxes.

Nowhere does it say you need taxes or tax forms. It is just one of seven documents suggested for proof that the spouses share a real marriage together on paper.

As for Part 10 of the N-400? The only thing that mentions taxes is article A5, which states:

It does NOT say you are required to file taxes, tax transcripts, or submit W2s for 1, 2, or 3 years, nor anything at all.

It just asks if you OWE taxes.

This is one of the many urban legends I hear about immigration and naturalization that bothers me. Because it terrifies people, and makes them think they cannot become citizens. Or delays the process.

I am surprised you posted those two links, and mentioned sections on them, without even reading them first...

Some of us have been there, and others fail at reading comprehension. Which one are you? :rofl:

Edited by The Patriot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you are applying for naturalization on the basis of marriage to a U.S. citizen, send the following 4 items:

.

.

.

4. Documents referring to you and your spouse:

a. Tax returns, bank accounts, leases, mortgages, or birth certificates of children;
or

b. Internal Revenue Service (IRS)-certified copies of the income tax forms that you both filed for the past 3 years;
or

c. An IRS tax return transcript for the last 3 years.

One of the three is required to be filed with the N-400. They will ask for IRS Transcripts at the Naturalization interview, if you didn't provide them already when you filed.

Further:

If you have ever failed to file an income tax return since you became a Lawful Permanent Resident, send:

All correspondence with the IRS regarding your failure to file.

If you have any Federal, state or local taxes that are overdue, send:

A signed agreement from the IRS or state or local tax office showing that you have filed a tax return and arranged to pay the taxes you owe;
and

Documentation from the IRS or state or local tax office showing the current status of your repayment program.

All this and more can be found at: http://www.uscis.gov/n-400

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you reported your income on your income tax forms?

Your tax returns are very important proof

that you are eligible for naturalization. On

the day of your interview, bring certified tax

returns for the last 5 years (3 years if you

are married to a U.S. citizen). Certified tax

transcripts may be ordered by using Internal

Revenue Service (IRS) Form 4506-T available at www.irs.gov

or calling 1-800-829-1040.

http://www.uscis.gov/USCIS/Office%20of%20Citizenship/Citizenship%20Resource%20Center%20Site/Publications/PDFs/G-1151.pdf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[waves hullo!]


Sometimes my language usage seems confusing - please feel free to 'read it twice', just in case !
Ya know, you can find the answer to your question with the advanced search tool, when using a PC? Ditch the handphone, come back later on a PC, and try again.

-=-=-=-=-=R E A D ! ! !=-=-=-=-=-

Whoa Nelly ! Want NVC Info? see http://www.visajourney.com/wiki/index.php/NVC_Process

Congratulations on your approval ! We All Applaud your accomplishment with Most Wonderful Kissies !

2mzcunl.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×