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TexasMojo66

Documents Translated in English

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Hello everyone and thanks in advance for all your help (I will need it!). I met with an immigration attorney in Dallas today and was not extremely impressed. I had a copy of the VJ Guide with me for reference and what they were asking for "now" was not the same items. Also, I asked the question about translated documents for the I-129F petition. They said that it was required along with a copy (and translated version of her birth certificate which I did not find in the Guide). I was wondering that if the documents my finance sends me per the I-129F guide (e.g. divorce decree) must be translated in english? Also, do I need a copy of her birth certificate and translated version?

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Hello everyone and thanks in advance for all your help (I will need it!). I met with an immigration attorney in Dallas today and was not extremely impressed. I had a copy of the VJ Guide with me for reference and what they were asking for "now" was not the same items. Also, I asked the question about translated documents for the I-129F petition. They said that it was required along with a copy (and translated version of her birth certificate which I did not find in the Guide). I was wondering that if the documents my finance sends me per the I-129F guide (e.g. divorce decree) must be translated in english? Also, do I need a copy of her birth certificate and translated version?

Her divorce decree will need to be translated, yes.

Her birth certificate will not be needed until the interview stage, and unless she'll be interviewing at a different Embassy than the one in her own country, she would not need to have it translated; however, you'll need translations to get a marriage license (most likely) and to apply for Adjustment of Status (AOS) after you guys get married.

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For the I-129F petition, the only thing she needs to send you, is a signed copy of the G-325A form with her information--including passport style photo, and a signed letter of intent to marry. If she was married before, then a translated copy of her divorce decree.

Her birth certificate would be needed later on for the interview stage, and not sure about your embassy, but in Colombia it is not required to be translated to English.

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Her divorce decree will need to be translated, yes.

Her birth certificate will not be needed until the interview stage, and unless she'll be interviewing at a different Embassy than the one in her own country, she would not need to have it translated; however, you'll need translations to get a marriage license (most likely) and to apply for Adjustment of Status (AOS) after you guys get married.

Thank you!

For the I-129F petition, the only thing she needs to send you, is a signed copy of the G-325A form with her information--including passport style photo, and a signed letter of intent to marry. If she was married before, then a translated copy of her divorce decree.

Her birth certificate would be needed later on for the interview stage, and not sure about your embassy, but in Colombia it is not required to be translated to English.

Thank you!

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One more thing I wanted to note: Just because an attorney asks for more/different info than the VJ guides doesn't mean you need to immediately call their expertise into question. Because the attorney is taking your case, start to finish, they often want a lot more info and documentation upfront so they can check for and avoid any pitfalls along the way. Also, most attorneys I know get the birth certificate translated no matter what, because sooner or later, there's a chance you'll need it. Personally, I translate my documents myself and then have someone unrelated to the process and competent in both languages check, verify, and sign the certifying statement on them.


Long story short, we have a complicated case. We've been at this for nearly 5 years. You can read our story here. I highly recommend our attorney Laurel Scott, as well as attorneys Laura Fernandez and Lizz Cannon .

Filed I-130 via CSC in Feb 2008. Petition approved June 2008. Consular interview in Mexico, Oct 2008, visa denied, INA 212a6cii. We allege improper application of the law in this case.

2012, started over in Seoul: I-130 filed DCF on 7/2, I-130 approved 8/8, Medical at Yonsei Severance 11/20, IR1 appointment in November 2012.

CRBA filed 1-3-13 at Seoul for our daughter

4MLHm5.pngCzLqp9.png

You can find me at

Immigrate2us.net as Los G :)

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One more thing I wanted to note: Just because an attorney asks for more/different info than the VJ guides doesn't mean you need to immediately call their expertise into question. Because the attorney is taking your case, start to finish, they often want a lot more info and documentation upfront so they can check for and avoid any pitfalls along the way. Also, most attorneys I know get the birth certificate translated no matter what, because sooner or later, there's a chance you'll need it. Personally, I translate my documents myself and then have someone unrelated to the process and competent in both languages check, verify, and sign the certifying statement on them.

Thank you for you input. My problem is that there was not conversation about "cover letter" or original "letter of intent", etc. Not that I expected him to know where Moldova was or anything like that. I went for a consultation and basically got handed a checklist. There was very little interaction, questions, or anything like that. Maybe I expected a little too much? You don't get much for $50 these days. :)

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I think there are a lot of differences between doing a process DIY and doing it with a lawyer. I say this having done it both ways. I successfully filed my first petition 4 yrs ago DIY (the petition was successful, the rest of the process..well...anyway). Filed my second this year with a lawyer because she's handling all aspects of our case, even though I know I could have easily done it myself. I knew exactly what to do, but I followed my lawyer's lead because her office does these petitions like clockwork. And yeah, there were some things that were different than what I would have done, but she knows what she's doing.

Sure, it's a bit impersonal, and it does take a little longer than doing it yourself because everything has to go through the lawyer, get checked over, then sent back, then submitted, etc. On the plus side, they usually have a lot more familiarity with what's going on, and they (should) do a lot of the sorting/assembly and such for you, including writing any cover letter and perhaps even giving you a template or drafted letter of intent to sign. If you wonder about those things, that would be a good thing to try to bring up in the consultation, it's always important to establish who is doing what. This time around, I found it comforting to work with a lawyer during the Affidavit of Support stage because our financial situation has complicated dramatically since I last filed and I had a dozen and a half uncertainties, all of which my lawyer was able to quickly slay, and all I had to do was give her numbers and figures. Next thing I know, a lovely I-864 affidavit of support came in the mail from her office, all filled out and ready to be signed. It was a beautiful thing. There are times when working with a pro who has done all this many times before can be really comforting.

Also, VisaJourney is an AWESOME resource, but you notice that people get RFEs and have glitches in their cases on this forum all the time. Just because a guide says you need something doesn't always mean that's the best thing for your particular case, and sometimes you need something else, or something in a different format, or it's just a crapshoot. Hello embassies like San Salvador, Manila, Bogota. Ideally a lawyer is able to match your situation with the specific requirements at the consulate where you'll end up processing, although I also suspect there aren't many lawyers with significant experience with Moldova. The best indicator is how many cases like yours they deal with on a regular basis. If they're handling dozens of I-129fs a year, I'd trust that this is a reliable attorney. If they mainly handle employment petitions, or deportation cases, or student/visitor visas, then I wouldn't so much trust their guidance.

If you feel unsettled about your attorney, you can always consult with another to verify that what you've been told is correct. If you decide working with an attorney is not a good choice for you, be sure to inform your lawyer right away and be sure any contract you signed is fulfilled, and that you get a full copy of your file from them. If they resist that last part, you can involve the State Bar to ensure your rights as a client are enforced.


Long story short, we have a complicated case. We've been at this for nearly 5 years. You can read our story here. I highly recommend our attorney Laurel Scott, as well as attorneys Laura Fernandez and Lizz Cannon .

Filed I-130 via CSC in Feb 2008. Petition approved June 2008. Consular interview in Mexico, Oct 2008, visa denied, INA 212a6cii. We allege improper application of the law in this case.

2012, started over in Seoul: I-130 filed DCF on 7/2, I-130 approved 8/8, Medical at Yonsei Severance 11/20, IR1 appointment in November 2012.

CRBA filed 1-3-13 at Seoul for our daughter

4MLHm5.pngCzLqp9.png

You can find me at

Immigrate2us.net as Los G :)

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I think there are a lot of differences between doing a process DIY and doing it with a lawyer. I say this having done it both ways. I successfully filed my first petition 4 yrs ago DIY (the petition was successful, the rest of the process..well...anyway). Filed my second this year with a lawyer because she's handling all aspects of our case, even though I know I could have easily done it myself. I knew exactly what to do, but I followed my lawyer's lead because her office does these petitions like clockwork. And yeah, there were some things that were different than what I would have done, but she knows what she's doing.

Sure, it's a bit impersonal, and it does take a little longer than doing it yourself because everything has to go through the lawyer, get checked over, then sent back, then submitted, etc. On the plus side, they usually have a lot more familiarity with what's going on, and they (should) do a lot of the sorting/assembly and such for you, including writing any cover letter and perhaps even giving you a template or drafted letter of intent to sign. If you wonder about those things, that would be a good thing to try to bring up in the consultation, it's always important to establish who is doing what. This time around, I found it comforting to work with a lawyer during the Affidavit of Support stage because our financial situation has complicated dramatically since I last filed and I had a dozen and a half uncertainties, all of which my lawyer was able to quickly slay, and all I had to do was give her numbers and figures. Next thing I know, a lovely I-864 affidavit of support came in the mail from her office, all filled out and ready to be signed. It was a beautiful thing. There are times when working with a pro who has done all this many times before can be really comforting.

Also, VisaJourney is an AWESOME resource, but you notice that people get RFEs and have glitches in their cases on this forum all the time. Just because a guide says you need something doesn't always mean that's the best thing for your particular case, and sometimes you need something else, or something in a different format, or it's just a crapshoot. Hello embassies like San Salvador, Manila, Bogota. Ideally a lawyer is able to match your situation with the specific requirements at the consulate where you'll end up processing, although I also suspect there aren't many lawyers with significant experience with Moldova. The best indicator is how many cases like yours they deal with on a regular basis. If they're handling dozens of I-129fs a year, I'd trust that this is a reliable attorney. If they mainly handle employment petitions, or deportation cases, or student/visitor visas, then I wouldn't so much trust their guidance.

If you feel unsettled about your attorney, you can always consult with another to verify that what you've been told is correct. If you decide working with an attorney is not a good choice for you, be sure to inform your lawyer right away and be sure any contract you signed is fulfilled, and that you get a full copy of your file from them. If they resist that last part, you can involve the State Bar to ensure your rights as a client are enforced.

GHM - Thank you so much. I guess I had become concerned as things just seemed different in the consultation than I was expecting. I do know that the attorney I met with is a professional and they do a lot of these. However, I believe that many of the cases they handle are related to Mexico and South America. But I do understand what you are saying and appreciate it very much. I'm glad that you are sharing your experience of filing DIY and with an attorney. I think time could be a big issue for me as my fiance's son will turn early next summer. This gives us a 'window' for him and his K-2. I think at this point I am much more concerned about the time factor than any other issue. It sounds as if I use an attorney it will take longer (as you indicated) and I may have little choice than to do this myself as they will want to prepare all the documents themselves.

Again, I appreciate your kind input and I'm sure I'll have more questions as I move forward.

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