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Jay11

Do I need spouse at citizenship interview?

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Hi everyone. I will be going for my US citizenship interview soon and I would like to know if I have to take my spouse with me. Is it possible for me to go alone? What would happen if I went alone? Thanks in advance for any help you may be able to offer.

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In all but the most unusual circumstances, the spouse is not allowed to be with you when you are being interviewed. There is a psychological component when the I.O. sees you sitting with your spouse in the waiting room, but that's about it. So, no, you don't need your spouse to join you when you go to the interview.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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In all but the most unusual circumstances, the spouse is not allowed to be with you when you are being interviewed. There is a psychological component when the I.O. sees you sitting with your spouse in the waiting room, but that's about it. So, no, you don't need your spouse to join you when you go to the interview.

Thank you for your detailed response, it really helped. I have one more question though, if you have the time...

If I'm there alone, is there a chance the IO would want to see/speak to my spouse? If yes, would my interview be rescheduled/delayed for another day because of that?

Edited by Jay11

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The I.O. walked out to ask us a question about doing a name change. My wife could have answered that question without me though. I don't think your spouse needs to be there at all. I was there for moral support only.

LS


08.15.2005 Mailed I-129F USPS

01.11.2006 P.O.E Seattle. Welcome to the U.S.A.

02.10.2006 Married

AOS Journey

03.27.2006 I-485 Mailed

08.21.2006 Green Card Arrivesl

11.19.2006 Emma is born

Removing Conditions

07.07.2008 I-751 Mailed

04.30.2009 Date of Decision: Approved

05.14.2010 Lilly is born

Citizenship: The Final Chapter

10.26.2010 N-400 Mailed

11.02.2010 NOA

11.05.2010 Biometrics Letter

11.10.2010 Biometrics Completed (walk-in)

04.13.2011 Interview

04.13.2011 Oath

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Are you applying under the 3-year rule? I think it is better if your souse is there but if he has something important to do it is OK, you just want to be ready to explain IF it comes up. It shouldn't be a biggie, but it really just depends on the IO. My IO asked where my husband was and I told him he is sitting in the car outside...and he didn't seem too satisfied with the answer.

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I applied using the 3-yr rule and did NOT go with my USC husband as he was of town. IO did ask if I was there with my husband and I told her no. It wasnt a problem as shejust continued with the interview.


Jan 1999- F1 to USA

June 2006- AOS thru D.O.R.A.

Dec 2009- Oath. Finally a U.S Citizen

I am proud to be Tanzamerican!

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Under "normal" circumstances, the marriage is not under scrutiny anymore at the N-400 stage. Only if a case is a bit . . . , um, "fishy," or the I.O. suspects that the couple has separated, or some other weird circumstances come into play, the presence of the spouse can be helpful. Other than that, it's really just for moral support and a sign that you are still "together."


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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My wifes' IO didn't want anything to do with me, couldn't even return a friendly hello. But according to my wife at her interview, she sure wanted to see my papers. On only one instance on this board, did I read from a woman, her IO wanted to meet her husband.

All I can conclude is that this depends on your IO, but can tell you, nothing, nowhere, from the USCIS tells you that your spouse has to be present. And by present, I mean in the waiting room. In your interviewers office, will just be your interviewer and you.

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My wife didn't even have her wedding ring on. LOL

LS


08.15.2005 Mailed I-129F USPS

01.11.2006 P.O.E Seattle. Welcome to the U.S.A.

02.10.2006 Married

AOS Journey

03.27.2006 I-485 Mailed

08.21.2006 Green Card Arrivesl

11.19.2006 Emma is born

Removing Conditions

07.07.2008 I-751 Mailed

04.30.2009 Date of Decision: Approved

05.14.2010 Lilly is born

Citizenship: The Final Chapter

10.26.2010 N-400 Mailed

11.02.2010 NOA

11.05.2010 Biometrics Letter

11.10.2010 Biometrics Completed (walk-in)

04.13.2011 Interview

04.13.2011 Oath

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It all depends on the IO. In my case for instance I didn't bring my wife because she had to work. I was asked by the IO why she was not present with me.

So if the spouse can come, it won't hurt one bit, however, it's not mandatory at all. You may get questioned to as why they are not present though.

So if your spouse is busy that day and has prior commitments, then I wouldn't worry too much if they weren't present...


I'm just a wanderer in the desert winds...

Timeline

1997

Oct - Job offer in US

Nov - Received my TN-1 to be authorized to work in the US

Nov - Moved to US

1998-2001

Recieved 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th TN

2002

May - Met future wife at arts fest

Nov - Recieved 6th TN

2003

Nov - Recieved 7th TN

Jul - Our Wedding

Aug - Filed for AOS

Sep - Recieved EAD

Sep - Recieved Advanced Parole

2004

Jan - Interview, accepted for Green Card

Feb - Green Card Arrived in mail

2005

Oct - I-751 sent off

2006

Jan - 10 year Green Card accepted

Mar - 10 year Green Card arrived

Oct - Filed N-400 for Naturalization

Nov - Biometrics done

Nov - Just recieved Naturalization Interview date for Jan.

2007

Jan - Naturalization Interview Completed

Feb - Oath Letter recieved

Feb - Oath Ceremony

Feb 21 - Finally a US CITIZEN (yay)

THE END

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Still take issue with this, major part of a marriage interview is dealing with all the evidence presented for a valid marriage, and every bit of evidence has the spouses name on it. If it didn't have the spouses name on it, it wouldn't be evidence. So feel that spouse should be present to defend themselves for at least that phase of the interview. After that, then they can be kicked out.

I did spend a lot of time with my wife explaining all of our evidence, she did okay. Did ask my stepdaughter that is a junior in college now, did you ever have a course on how to fill out income tax forms? She said no, explains why 62% of Americans can't fill out their own tax forms. Also in my state, a married couple is equally responsible for your spouses debts, and joint ownership is the law of all goods. But no one explained that to the USCIS, with or without the paperwork.

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I just want to say thank you to everyone who replied to my question and offered great advice. I will definitely be ready when the interview comes. Thank you all once again. Much appreciated!

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