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calidog

Applying for US Citizenship

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Hi everyone,

I need you guys help regarding my grand mothers case. My grandma is 75 yrs old and she has a green card since last 20 yrs, but she is been back n forth from home country to US many times. She never resided here in US 5 straight years. Also, she doesnt speak english neither can understand. Is there any way that she can apply for a citizenship and the test can be waive for her.

Thanks!

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your grand mother,on the n-400form there is a question hoe many trips out side of the us and how long and the dates,she may have a issue with that since she did not pay taxes or rent receipts ,she is 75 or older she is exempt for the biometrics fingerprints,also she is exempted to limited civil test,but you have to live in the us 10 years.you should realy read the citizenship guides instructions,

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She may be exempt from the English test and be eligible for the simplified civic test. However, in order to find out if she qualifies you need to check if she ever has been out of the US for 1 year or longer since she became a resident 20 years ago.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Yeah, she lived more than a year outside of the united states, and her Green card got expired then she renewed it and came back. She is also been trying to maintain the residency requirement since last 5 years, and in the mean time she took a 2 yr permit to live outside the united states because of her health situation its pretty hard for her to travel. Now she wants to live here permanently because her all children's and grandchildren's are citizens.

Is there any possibility ?

Thanks!

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Yeah, she lived more than a year outside of the united states, and her Green card got expired then she renewed it and came back. She is also been trying to maintain the residency requirement since last 5 years, and in the mean time she took a 2 yr permit to live outside the united states because of her health situation its pretty hard for her to travel. Now she wants to live here permanently because her all children's and grandchildren's are citizens.

Is there any possibility ?

Thanks!

Eligibility Requirements for Naturalization

To become a naturalized US citizen, you must meet several general requirements including age, residence, presence, moral character, English language, U.S. history, etc. Below is a list of basic requirements for naturalization, for more details please download USCIS Guide to Naturalization:

* You are a lawful permanent resident (green card holder);

* You must be 18 years of age or older;

* You have resided in the US as a LPR for at least 5 years, with no single absence from the US of more than one year. Absence of more than 6 months may restart the clock of counting Continuous Residence (Note that "resided" means "retained legal residence," which is different than "physically present" in the following requirement);

* You have been physically present in the US for at least half of the last 5 years (30 months) ("physically present" means you are actually in the U.S.);

* You have resided within a state or district for at least 3 months;

* You must be a person of good moral character (certain crimes such as aggravated felony, drug related, gambling offenses, prostitution, etc. will most likely disqualify an applicant);

* You can read, write, speak and understand basic English;

* You have a basic knowledge of US history and government (see test questions);

* You must show attachment to the principles of the Constitution;

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Eligibility Requirements for Naturalization

To become a naturalized US citizen, you must meet several general requirements including age, residence, presence, moral character, English language, U.S. history, etc. Below is a list of basic requirements for naturalization, for more details please download USCIS Guide to Naturalization:

* You are a lawful permanent resident (green card holder);

* You must be 18 years of age or older;

* You have resided in the US as a LPR for at least 5 years, with no single absence from the US of more than one year. Absence of more than 6 months may restart the clock of counting Continuous Residence (Note that "resided" means "retained legal residence," which is different than "physically present" in the following requirement);

* You have been physically present in the US for at least half of the last 5 years (30 months) ("physically present" means you are actually in the U.S.);

* You have resided within a state or district for at least 3 months;

* You must be a person of good moral character (certain crimes such as aggravated felony, drug related, gambling offenses, prostitution, etc. will most likely disqualify an applicant);

* You can read, write, speak and understand basic English;

* You have a basic knowledge of US history and government (see test questions);

* You must show attachment to the principles of the Constitution;

How to Calculate Continuous Residence

The five-year "continuous residence" requirement means that you have not left the United States for a long period of time during the five years prior to your application for naturalization. If you leave the United States for too long, you may interrupt your continuous residence.

* If you left the United States for six months or less, you are OK. You still maintain continuous residence;

* If you left the United States for more than six months, but less than one year, you have broken your continuous residence unless you can prove otherwise. You need to provide additional documents;

* If you left the United States for one year or more, you almost certainly have broken your continuous residence. The time you spent before leaving the U.S. will not count toward meeting the five-year requirement. This is true even if you have a re-entry permit.

* If you left the United States for one year or more, but returned within two years, the last 364 days (1 year minus 1 day) outside the U.S. actually count toward your time in continuous residence. However, as mentioned above, the time you spent before leaving the U.S. does

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How to Calculate Continuous Residence

The five-year "continuous residence" requirement means that you have not left the United States for a long period of time during the five years prior to your application for naturalization. If you leave the United States for too long, you may interrupt your continuous residence.

* If you left the United States for six months or less, you are OK. You still maintain continuous residence;

* If you left the United States for more than six months, but less than one year, you have broken your continuous residence unless you can prove otherwise. You need to provide additional documents;

* If you left the United States for one year or more, you almost certainly have broken your continuous residence. The time you spent before leaving the U.S. will not count toward meeting the five-year requirement. This is true even if you have a re-entry permit.

* If you left the United States for one year or more, but returned within two years, the last 364 days (1 year minus 1 day) outside the U.S. actually count toward your time in continuous residence. However, as mentioned above, the time you spent before leaving the U.S. does

Thanks guys =)

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