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smurfette1971

dual citizenship ???

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When you go through a Removal of Conditions (citizenship) swear-in for the US, you do not lose your ties to Canada as a Canadian Citizen (if you are one). Therefore, you hold a dual-citizenship. There's no paperwork involved to "get" dual citizenship - you only lose Canadian citizenship if you file paperwork specifically for that purpose - papers dealing with the Canadian government, not US.

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When you go through a Removal of Conditions (citizenship) swear-in for the US, you do not lose your ties to Canada as a Canadian Citizen (if you are one). Therefore, you hold a dual-citizenship. There's no paperwork involved to "get" dual citizenship - you only lose Canadian citizenship if you file paperwork specifically for that purpose - papers dealing with the Canadian government, not US.

how do i go about doing that

being dual citizen

canada and usa

i want to be a dual citizen

What exactly do you want to know? How one becomes a "dual" citizen? Pros and cons of it?

yes how to become

if there is a wait i have to have

pros and cons

i am a canadian citizen and want to be dual citizen canada and usa

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You file for naturalization with the N-400 when you are able to and meet the requirements, pay the fees go take the speaking, writen and civics test and if you pass all that you will then get an oath cerimony where you get your naturalization certificate. After that you make a copy of it and go to the post office and apply for a US passport. Thats it. All you do is keep your US passport and your Canadian passport up-to-date and valid.


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Your I-129f was approved in 5 days from your NOA1 date.

Your interview took 67 days from your I-129F NOA1 date.

AOS was approved in 2 months and 8 days without interview.

ROC was approved in 3 months and 2 days without interview.

I am a Citizen of the United States of America. 04/16/13

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For the How to's - I'd suggest reading the VJ guides for the steps and forms for Naturalization - Inky's pretty much covered the basics.

I don't know if there are perks to being dual persay - but there are perks to being a citizen in the country you live in.

Pro's - for me personally I won't have to carry my GC around anymore or worry about losing it. I won't have to pay any more $$$ to immigration :P Being an immigrant has made me feel like a bit of a 2nd class citizen, I'd like to get rid of that stigma as much as I can. Since I'll likely be living here the rest of my life I'd like to be able to vote and feel like part of the club :)

You give yourself a choice of 2 countries to call home if you ever want to move in the future.

I suppose if you're dying to you could drop your Canadian citizenship - but there's no need to.

Cons - non that I can really think of at the moment. I think you'll need to figure out what works best for you and your family situation

Cheers - good luck on the decision


Wiz(USC) and Udella(Cdn & USC!)

Naturalization

02/22/11 - Filed

02/28/11 - NOA

03/28/11 - FP

06/17/11 - status change - scheduled for interview

06/20?/11 - received physical interview letter

07/13/11 - Interview in Fairfax,VA - easiest 10 minutes of my life

07/19/11 - Oath ceremony in Fairfax, VA

******************

Removal of Conditions

12/1/09 - received at VSC

12/2/09 - NOA's for self and daughter

01/12/10 - Biometrics completed

03/15/10 - 10 Green Card Received - self and daughter

******************

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If you you fool around with the search feature, you should find many posts regarding the + and -'s.


Canadians Visiting the USA while undergoing the visa process, my free advice:

1) Always tell the TRUTH. never lie to the POE officer

2) Be confident in ur replies

3) keep ur response short and to the point, don't tell ur life story!!

4) look the POE officer in the eye when speaking to them. They are looking for people lieing and have been trained to find them!

5) Pack light! No job resumes with you

6) Bring ties to Canada (letter from employer when ur expected back at work, lease, etc etc)

7) Always be polite, being rude isn't going to get ya anywhere, and could make things worse!!

8) Have a plan in case u do get denied (be polite) It wont harm ur visa application if ur denied,that is if ur polite and didn't lie! Refer to #1

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The biggest negative - for the rest of your life wherever you live you will need to file an Income Tax return with the IRS - you may not necessarily have to pay tax to them but you have to report to them.

Positives - there are lots of them especially as a spouse of a US citizen. You get to vote, you get the right to live in either country at choice without having your residency permission revoked, and one of the biggest - if anything happens to your US spouse you are no longer required to pay tax on the full value of your joint property (eg house, cars, any investments, pensions, etc.) - it is deferred until the time you die and your estate settles up. If you are a Permanent Resident spouse of a US citizen, however, there is no deferment - the tax is due on the total property, not just your spouses' half - immediately after death - you basically don't have right of deferment for the estate. This can mean the difference between having to sell your home and everything else in order to pay the taxes or to have time to make decisions about where to go in your life. (IRS expect PRs married to US citizens to leave the country when the US citizen dies and don't want them to leave without giving the IRS their fair share - so they take it up front rather than later).


“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

5892822976_477b1a77f7_z.jpg

Another Member of the VJ Fluffy Kitty Posse!

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The biggest negative - for the rest of your life wherever you live you will need to file an Income Tax return with the IRS - you may not necessarily have to pay tax to them but you have to report to them.

Positives - there are lots of them especially as a spouse of a US citizen. You get to vote, you get the right to live in either country at choice without having your residency permission revoked, and one of the biggest - if anything happens to your US spouse you are no longer required to pay tax on the full value of your joint property (eg house, cars, any investments, pensions, etc.) - it is deferred until the time you die and your estate settles up. If you are a Permanent Resident spouse of a US citizen, however, there is no deferment - the tax is due on the total property, not just your spouses' half - immediately after death - you basically don't have right of deferment for the estate. This can mean the difference between having to sell your home and everything else in order to pay the taxes or to have time to make decisions about where to go in your life. (IRS expect PRs married to US citizens to leave the country when the US citizen dies and don't want them to leave without giving the IRS their fair share - so they take it up front rather than later).

wow..I didn't know this..thank you for posting this Kathryn!


AOS

02/25/08 sent AOS packet

02/26/08 packet received chicago lockbox

03/03/08 NOA(I-485,I765,I131)for daughter and myself

03/09/08 received biometrics appointment letter

03/25/08 RFE recieved for NOA for I129F(USCIS lost it! DOH!)

03/25/08 RFE sent

03/26/08 biometrics appointment(YAY!)

03/26/08 EAD touched(for daughter and myself)

03/28/08 EAD touch again!

04/03/08 RFE received case processing resumes

04/29/08 request AP expedited

05/01/08 AP sent out

05/02/08 case transfered to CSC

05/02/08 EAD card production ordered

05/05/08 EAD card production ordered again

05/10/08 EAD card received

05/16/08 AOS touched

05/18/08 AOS touched again!

06/11/08 AOS card production ordered!

06/16/08 green card received in mail!!

no more USCIS for almost 2 years!!

ROC

04/07/10 sent I-751 to VSC

04/09/10 NOA recieved

04/13/10 cheque cashed

05/17/10 early biometrics

06/29/10 card production ordered

07/10/10 card received

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Interesting- I didn't know about the tax implications. Voting rights is the biggest thing for me. Also, I don't know if this is something that matters to you, but as a USC you also have the ability to sponsor family members and bring them to the US, like your parents. I doubt I'll ever convince my parents to move to the US, but it's a nice thought!

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What about the option to give up US citizenship in Montreal at the Montreal embassy? If you were to return to canada to live there and desided you did not want US citizenship ( ever again ) and you went in and signed the papers and gave over your US passport etc. Would you still be required to pay US taxes?


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Your I-129f was approved in 5 days from your NOA1 date.

Your interview took 67 days from your I-129F NOA1 date.

AOS was approved in 2 months and 8 days without interview.

ROC was approved in 3 months and 2 days without interview.

I am a Citizen of the United States of America. 04/16/13

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Inky,

thank you for bringing it up.

There are few reasons when giving up US citizenship makes sense. One of them would be if you've been elected King or Queen of Tonga, your former home country. Another one would be that the buddies in the Muslim terror organization you joined give you strange looks about being a US citizen. The by far most cited reason to give up US citizenship would be to avoid having to pay taxes when living out your final days on your remote island near Fiji.

However, and this is the good one, Uncle Sam says: if someone renounces their US citizenship in order to avoid a tax burden, then they accept the renouncement, but the tax burden still exists. Cool, huh?


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Was not asking as tax evasion. Was asking if a Canadian wished to return home to Canada and give up US citizenship because they did not want to ever return to the USA. If you would still have to file taxes in the US for any money you make while working in Canada.


-------------------------------------------- as1cE-a0g410010MjgybHN8MDA5Njk4c3xNYXJyaWVkIGZvcg.gif

Your I-129f was approved in 5 days from your NOA1 date.

Your interview took 67 days from your I-129F NOA1 date.

AOS was approved in 2 months and 8 days without interview.

ROC was approved in 3 months and 2 days without interview.

I am a Citizen of the United States of America. 04/16/13

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You answered your own question!

Why would they have to give up their US citizenship, just because they never want to return to the US? Why can't they live for the rest of their lives in Canada as Canadian and US citizens?

For tax reasons, of course!

Quote:

Also, persons who wish to renounce U.S. citizenship should also be aware that the fact that a person has renounced U.S. citizenship may have no effect whatsoever on his or her U.S. tax or military service obligations (contact the Internal Revenue Service or U.S. Selective Service for more information).

http://travel.state.gov/law/citizenship/citizenship_776.html


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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