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Lily1980

1st time applicante for US Passport

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Filed: Other Country: Colombia
Timeline

I have a major issue!

My entire family is having a family reunion in Colombia this summer and I can't find my Certificate of Naturalization to apply for my US Passport. I only have a copy. I did some research online and found out that it cost $380 to replace and take very long to get a replacement. Is there any other way, form for me to provide proof of Citizenship so I can get a passport and visit my family. Or I was also thinking that I still have a valid Colombian passport could I travel with that? And if I did how would I get back into the country? My travel plans are for The 1st week in August. Any advice will be greatly appreciated

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I have a major issue!

My entire family is having a family reunion in Colombia this summer and I can't find my Certificate of Naturalization to apply for my US Passport. I only have a copy. I did some research online and found out that it cost $380 to replace and take very long to get a replacement. Is there any other way, form for me to provide proof of Citizenship so I can get a passport and visit my family. Or I was also thinking that I still have a valid Colombian passport could I travel with that? And if I did how would I get back into the country? My travel plans are for The 1st week in August. Any advice will be greatly appreciated

You will need your certificate, there is no other way for you to prove your status. I strongly suggest you get to it ASAP (like first thing Monday morning) and request a new certificate if you want to go and join them, this is one of the main reasons they so strongly urge you to immediately apply for a passport (your other way, and more 'replaceable' way to prove your status) as soon as you are naturalized.

Do not even try to go with a Colombian passport, there will be nothing but trouble when you are trying coming back, the airline will not even let you board a plane home.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
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Moved from General Immigration Forum to US Citizenship General Discussion Forum as issue involves a US passport and the Citizenship document so is not immigration related.


“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

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Filed: Other Timeline

I agree.

The very first thing I'll do on the first morning after I get my naturalization certificate is apply for a US passport. The naturalization certificate will be kept safely in a place where it can't be lost, the same place where my passport, my Green Card, my Patek, and my emergency cash are right now.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

What did you do after you left the oath ceremony and how along ago what that? Not that any of us want to know, but for you to think about it and retrace your steps. That certificate to us was gold and took a long time to get it, hard to believe it was misplaced. Where did you make a copy of your certificate? In a scanner or a copy machine at home? Maybe you left it in there, I seem to do that all the time.

Worse thing is it got pitched with the trash, if you live alone, only have yourself to blame, with other family members, maybe they can help you refresh your memory, but you have to go into a dark room, lie flat on your back, relax, and think. Your subconscious mind knows exactly where it is at.

Say this, because your best bet is to find it.

To leave this country with a foreign passport you need at least a US tourist visa and a valid I-94 or a green card, they took your green card away. You will need your Colombian passport in Colombia to get in since you are considered a citizen of that country. And no way of coming back.

May be a slight bit of luck if you visit one of the twelve DOS service stations in person, and with your copy of your US certificate and beg for mercy, but that won't work with any of the 9,000 other agents plus any other USCIS proof you may have like your interview letter, that is only piece we have left after the citizen process, USCIS kept the oath letter.

Praying to St. Anthony also might help, doesn't hurt to try.

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Filed: Other Timeline

Strictly applied, even leaving the US requires a US passport.


There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

Strictly applied, even leaving the US requires a US passport.

That is true after a LPR becomes a US citizen, but before that day, can leave and return with a foreign passport with your green card. That is why, most of us immediately applied for a US passport, you find you were not as free as you were before. Probably poor planning on the part of the OP, then losing their US certificate.

Don't even require your certificate for SS, your US passport will suffice. But that darn DOS wants to see your original certificate and nothing else.

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Filed: Other Timeline

Nick . . . come on . . . what are you smoking dude?

Of course we are talking about "after having become a US citizen." Isn't this what this thread is all about? How else would somebody would need a US passport to leave the country if he wasn't a USC already?

Next time you're partying and having a good time, at least invite your buddy Bob over! I can't promise I come, but the invitation alone would make me feel special . . .

Edited by Just Bob

There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

Nick . . . come on . . . what are you smoking dude?

Of course we are talking about "after having become a US citizen." Isn't this what this thread is all about? How else would somebody would need a US passport to leave the country if he wasn't a USC already?

Next time you're partying and having a good time, at least invite your buddy Bob over! I can't promise I come, but the invitation alone would make me feel special . . .

Sometimes what you type in your frame of mind and how someone reads it, doesn't come across the way you would like it to. Thoughts were on my wife's oath ceremony, was awake, and listened carefully to every word. Perhaps instead of saying, now you are a naturalized citizen just like you were born here, should have said, congratulations, you can't travel anymore. And if you still want to visit your mom, you better maintain your foreign passport as well.

Recall going through all that patriotic stuff they gave her in a brown envelope, nothing about the steps you have to take after your oath ceremony, but we already found that on the net, and I already had her passport application typed out after I had my brain twisted from reading the instructions. I put everything we needed except the certificate in a folder marked US passport stuff, could remember thats all we needed to complete it. And for two weeks, wondered if we will ever see that certificate again.

Found it strange they didn't have my wife sign her certificate in front of one of their officers. Also found it strange the certificate said do not copy, but to make copies as the USCIS needs that to process a duplicate. They also know how to charge for this service, big time.

Can only wonder why the USCIS and the DOS aren't part of the same agency, dealing with the same subject of people coming or going from this same country. But apparently they don't talk nor listen to each other, just like between the CIA and the FBI. Just creates a mess we have to deal with.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

USCIS is posting six months processing time for the N-565 at the Vermont, Texas, and Nebraska service centers. Seems a bit better when I looked this up before my wife got her certificate. Was concerned, because the DOS did lose my birth certificate in my passport application, but was only eight bucks to get another certified copy.

At my wife's oath ceremony noticed her height numbers were printed directly above the feet and inches on the form, asked another applicant to glance at theirs, was the same way, so no they were using some kind of word processor "field" program to punch these out. Signature was prestamped, think they used gum to hold her photo on with a USCIS stamp half on her face, the rest on the certificate. Would think for the importance and cost of this document, would have least plastic laminate it.

I am not an paper expert, but the quality of the paper used for the certificate didn't seem as good as what I use that cost me 2 cents a sheet, like ten bucks for a ream of 500 sheets. Was tempted to plastic laminate it, but didn't dare, but enclosed it in a clear plastic like folder before sending it off to the DOS.

Besides the $380 fee, the long wait, the filling out of the N-565, USCIS also wants a copy of your original certificate and two passport type photos, this is too valuable of a document to lose. At our local DOS agent, the woman was going to remove my wife's certificate from that plastic folder and staple it to the application. Don't you dare do that I told her, just staple the plastic folder with the certificate on the inside to the application. Do you have any idea what a replacement certificate cost? She didn't, but was shocked when I told her.

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Filed: Other Timeline

I have a major issue!

My entire family is having a family reunion in Colombia this summer and I can't find my Certificate of Naturalization to apply for my US Passport. I only have a copy. I did some research online and found out that it cost $380 to replace and take very long to get a replacement. Is there any other way, form for me to provide proof of Citizenship so I can get a passport and visit my family. Or I was also thinking that I still have a valid Colombian passport could I travel with that? And if I did how would I get back into the country? My travel plans are for The 1st week in August. Any advice will be greatly appreciated

Lily1980-Sorry to hear that you lost your certificate. I hope you find it in time, or get a replacement before you travel..

By any chance, did you ever make a photocopy of your certificate? That would help too in getting a replacement...

And getting a replacement certificate is the only way to apply for a passport so that you can go to Columbia, so yeah, the $480 replacement is the only way to do this.....

Look everywhere for the certificate too! It will probably show up where you least expect it....lol..

How does one lose such an important document, I have no idea..... :blink:

But whatever you do, if you ever get a replacement certificate, make sure you (or anyone else) doesn't lose that one either!

Lesson learned: Keep the certificate in a safe place. Don't lose it yourself and don't let others lose it for you either!

Good luck.

Ant

Edited by Ant+D+BabyA

**Ant's 1432.gif1502.gif "Once Upon An American Immigration Journey" Condensed Timeline...**

2000 (72+ Months) "Loved": Long-Distance Dating Relationship. D Visited Ant in Canada.

2006 (<1 Month) "Visited": Ant Visited D in America. B-2 Visa Port of Entry Interrogation.

2006 (<1 Month) "Married": Wedding Elopement. Husband & Wife, D and Ant !! Together Forever!

2006 ( 3 Months I-485 Wait) "Adjusted": 2-Years Green Card.

2007 ( 2 Months) "Numbered": SSN Card.

2007 (<1 Months) "Licensed": NYS 4-Years Driver's License.

2009 (10 Months I-751 Wait) "Removed": 10-Years 5-Months Green Card.

2009 ( 9 Months Baby Wait) "Expected": Baby. It's a Boy, Baby A !!! We Are Family, Ant+D+BabyA !

2009 ( 4 Months) "Moved": New House Constructed and Moved Into.

2009 ( 2 Months N-400 Wait) "Naturalized": US Citizenship, Certificate of Naturalization. Goodbye USCIS!!!!

***Ant is a Naturalized American Citizen!!***: November 23, 2009 (Private Oath Ceremony: USCIS Office, Buffalo, NY, USA)

2009 (<1 Month) "Secured": US Citizen SSN Card.

2009 (<1 Month) "Enhanced": US Citizen NYS 8-Years Enhanced Driver's License. (in lieu of a US Passport)

2010 ( 1 Month) "Voted": US Citizen NYS Voter's Registration Card.

***~~~"The End...And the Americans, Ant+D+BabyA, lived 'Happily Ever After'!"...~~~***

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By any chance, did you ever make a photocopy of your certificate? That would help too in getting a replacement...

You know I have heard that too, but it is pretty bizarre considering it tells you right on there that copying and photographing the certificate is strictly prohibited blink.gif

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Filed: Other Timeline

You know I have heard that too, but it is pretty bizarre considering it tells you right on there that copying and photographing the certificate is strictly prohibited blink.gif

CaptainPenguin-I found it a contradiction too.....

On the certificate itself it says.."It is illegal to photocopy...." (or something along those lines...)

But...If you want a replcement certificate, on the USCIS application form it says..."Enclose a copy of your certificate...." (or something along those lines...)

So I confronted the USCIS about this after my oath ceremony....Lol...I left the Officer speechless....:lol:....

(I guess I'm the only one that questions about such things...lol..can't blame them though....not too many people care about spending more money and waiting for a replacement...lol...)

Then they verbally told me "Well, one copy for personal use is fine....."....

So I'm holding them on their word about that....lol....I made one black and white copy for personal use...Just in case...;)

Now the DMV, Social Security Administration, and other government agencies made photocopies too...To update my files/records to reflect the fact that I am a US Citizen...and they think nothing of that fact, despite what is written on the certificate.....So tell me, if they make photocopies, are they doing something illegal too?

Lol..See my point is...The government can makes photocopies...But we can't make copies, despite the certificate being ours and having our informaiton on it...hmm......Contradictory, indeed!

So to the OP-Even though you don't have a photocopy of your original certificate, that's ok. After all, it is 'illegal' to photocopy such, as says so on the certificate. Lol..And they shouldn't cause you any further delays for a replacement because of that...After all, you were just doing what it says on the certificate..... :whistle:

Ant


**Ant's 1432.gif1502.gif "Once Upon An American Immigration Journey" Condensed Timeline...**

2000 (72+ Months) "Loved": Long-Distance Dating Relationship. D Visited Ant in Canada.

2006 (<1 Month) "Visited": Ant Visited D in America. B-2 Visa Port of Entry Interrogation.

2006 (<1 Month) "Married": Wedding Elopement. Husband & Wife, D and Ant !! Together Forever!

2006 ( 3 Months I-485 Wait) "Adjusted": 2-Years Green Card.

2007 ( 2 Months) "Numbered": SSN Card.

2007 (<1 Months) "Licensed": NYS 4-Years Driver's License.

2009 (10 Months I-751 Wait) "Removed": 10-Years 5-Months Green Card.

2009 ( 9 Months Baby Wait) "Expected": Baby. It's a Boy, Baby A !!! We Are Family, Ant+D+BabyA !

2009 ( 4 Months) "Moved": New House Constructed and Moved Into.

2009 ( 2 Months N-400 Wait) "Naturalized": US Citizenship, Certificate of Naturalization. Goodbye USCIS!!!!

***Ant is a Naturalized American Citizen!!***: November 23, 2009 (Private Oath Ceremony: USCIS Office, Buffalo, NY, USA)

2009 (<1 Month) "Secured": US Citizen SSN Card.

2009 (<1 Month) "Enhanced": US Citizen NYS 8-Years Enhanced Driver's License. (in lieu of a US Passport)

2010 ( 1 Month) "Voted": US Citizen NYS Voter's Registration Card.

***~~~"The End...And the Americans, Ant+D+BabyA, lived 'Happily Ever After'!"...~~~***

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

Wife was told at her oath ceremony to make a copy of her certificate in case it is lost, since I was there, also heard that. Never said a black and white only, so I scanned it and with my photo program, typed in, "Copy for USCIS Replacement Only" in red letters in a blank space. Guess I am paranoid after dealing with the USCIS. But obviously, a copy even without that notice.

Not sure if we will ever have to use it again after sending it to the DOS for her US passport, in just about all cases, her passport will suffice, and to renew it, don't need that certificate even for them. But if you lose it before getting that passport, I really don't know what to say except get it renewed. Still wonder if the DOS will accept a copy at one of their 12 service centers with a long tearful explanation. Also wonder if they make a copy of it.

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