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Tim and Erin

What if we decided to do the reverse?

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Canada
Timeline

No, we haven't changed our minds about marrying and moving me to the States. But I was just curious to know more about Canadian immigration laws and how it affects people who want to bring a spouse/fiance from the States to live in Canada. Is it faster than the other way around? Less expensive?

Does anyone know of a website/support group who has good info about this? I'd just like to read more about it, for my own curiosity.

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Canada
Timeline

Canadians Visiting the USA while undergoing the visa process, my free advice:

1) Always tell the TRUTH. never lie to the POE officer

2) Be confident in ur replies

3) keep ur response short and to the point, don't tell ur life story!!

4) look the POE officer in the eye when speaking to them. They are looking for people lieing and have been trained to find them!

5) Pack light! No job resumes with you

6) Bring ties to Canada (letter from employer when ur expected back at work, lease, etc etc)

7) Always be polite, being rude isn't going to get ya anywhere, and could make things worse!!

8) Have a plan in case u do get denied (be polite) It wont harm ur visa application if ur denied,that is if ur polite and didn't lie! Refer to #1

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No, we haven't changed our minds about marrying and moving me to the States. But I was just curious to know more about Canadian immigration laws and how it affects people who want to bring a spouse/fiance from the States to live in Canada. Is it faster than the other way around? Less expensive?

Does anyone know of a website/support group who has good info about this? I'd just like to read more about it, for my own curiosity.

It's NOT faster, and NOT less expensive, I can tell you that much. I have 3 friends who are currently trying to bring their spouses into Canada. I also know there's a forum similar to VJ in reverse.. lol but I've heard it's not as active, and I'm sorry I don't remember exactly what the link is... hopefully someone else does.

I can try to get some basic information from my friends, but from what I have heard so far, it's definitely not much better by comparison... :( You still have to jump through just as many hoops really.

hah funny... I didn't even see that topic (neither did the OP apparently)


For details visit My Timeline or Profile

ROC Timeline:
May 23, 2012 - Mailed I-751
January 7, 2013 - RFE Received
March 26, 2013 - RFE Response Sent
April 11, 2013 - ROC APPROVED

June 8th, 2013 - 10 yr GC Received (FINALLY)

AOS Timeline:
March 23, 2010 - Mailed I-485 (AOS), I-131 (AP), I-765 (EAD)
June 7, 2010 - AP received
June 12, 2010 - EAD received
August 27, 2010 - 2 yr Green Card Received!


K-1 Timeline:
April 22, 2009 - I-129F Sent
November 20, 2009 - Interview in Montreal - Approved!
January 3, 2010 - POE (Ambassador Bridge)
January 20, 2010 - Wedding

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Canada
Timeline

maybe this forum http://www.roadtocanada.com/

I spoke to a specialist - there's no equivalent to fiance(e) but there is a conjugal, commonlaw, and spousal process. It's possible to get a fiance(e) in if there is some extenuating circumstances that prevents living together and/or marriage. The advice I was given is to marry and apply.

I don't understand this completely, but I was also told to apply to Canada after we get married in the US, to get that process started in case we do want to do the reverse in the future, or run into problems with the US process. There is something in there about the non Canadian being able to build residency by living with a Canadian citizen in a marriage even though they aren't physically in Canada. Don't ask me to explain it more because I don't know more : )

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Canada
Timeline
I don't understand this completely, but I was also told to apply to Canada after we get married in the US, to get that process started in case we do want to do the reverse in the future, or run into problems with the US process. There is something in there about the non Canadian being able to build residency by living with a Canadian citizen in a marriage even though they aren't physically in Canada. Don't ask me to explain it more because I don't know more : )

That is only in special circumstances - work contracts, etc.

As an American who has gone though Canadian immigration - it is A LOT easier in terms of the process itself. The application is gigantic and you have to send in a crapton of evidence (as there is no interview involved). You have to wait for first stage of approval to apply for a work permit.

My timeline was like this:

Applied: June 6, 2006

First Stage: March, 2007

Approved: July 4, 2007 (woot!)

Landed: August 7, 2007


Montreal: BEAT!!! Approved!!!!!

event.png

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Filed: AOS (apr) Country: Canada
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I have been looking into the possibility of moving to Canada instead of the US as well (but since we are almost near the end of the US process we decided to stick with it). I found this forum http://www.immigration.ca/discussion2/forum.asp?FORUM_ID=6 and found it to have a little more info then the Road2Canada forum. The nice thing is that while you are waiting for you application to be processed your spouse get a visitors record which will allow your spouse to stay in Canada for a year while your application is being processed. although they won't be able to work at this time at least you get to be together!!!

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Canada
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maybe this forum http://www.roadtocanada.com/

I spoke to a specialist - there's no equivalent to fiance(e) but there is a conjugal, commonlaw, and spousal process. It's possible to get a fiance(e) in if there is some extenuating circumstances that prevents living together and/or marriage. The advice I was given is to marry and apply.

I don't understand this completely, but I was also told to apply to Canada after we get married in the US, to get that process started in case we do want to do the reverse in the future, or run into problems with the US process. There is something in there about the non Canadian being able to build residency by living with a Canadian citizen in a marriage even though they aren't physically in Canada. Don't ask me to explain it more because I don't know more : )

This is an interesting question really.

So scenario - say someone is living in the U.S. with their American spouse and they put in an application for said American spouse to become a PR of Canada. Now we know that you can maintain your Canadian PR-ness by living with your Canadian spouse, even outside of Canada.

So this begs the question, is there any reason why someone who is living in the U.S. cannot sponsor their spouse as a PR and then the fact that they live together, although perhaps have never lived in Canada, would suffice for the American to maintain their Canadian residency for PR purposes.

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Filed: Other Country: Canada
Timeline
No, we haven't changed our minds about marrying and moving me to the States. But I was just curious to know more about Canadian immigration laws and how it affects people who want to bring a spouse/fiance from the States to live in Canada. Is it faster than the other way around? Less expensive?

Does anyone know of a website/support group who has good info about this? I'd just like to read more about it, for my own curiosity.

It's NOT faster, and NOT less expensive, I can tell you that much. I have 3 friends who are currently trying to bring their spouses into Canada. I also know there's a forum similar to VJ in reverse.. lol but I've heard it's not as active, and I'm sorry I don't remember exactly what the link is... hopefully someone else does.

I can try to get some basic information from my friends, but from what I have heard so far, it's definitely not much better by comparison... :( You still have to jump through just as many hoops really.

I don't know about your friends, but in my case, immigrating to Canada was extremely quick. From start to finish, it took six months. Compared to how long it often takes to immigrate to the U.S., I'd say immigrating to Canada is faster. But then again, that's my experience.

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Filed: Country: Canada
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maybe this forum http://www.roadtocanada.com/

I spoke to a specialist - there's no equivalent to fiance(e) but there is a conjugal, commonlaw, and spousal process. It's possible to get a fiance(e) in if there is some extenuating circumstances that prevents living together and/or marriage. The advice I was given is to marry and apply.

I don't understand this completely, but I was also told to apply to Canada after we get married in the US, to get that process started in case we do want to do the reverse in the future, or run into problems with the US process. There is something in there about the non Canadian being able to build residency by living with a Canadian citizen in a marriage even though they aren't physically in Canada. Don't ask me to explain it more because I don't know more : )

This is an interesting question really.

So scenario - say someone is living in the U.S. with their American spouse and they put in an application for said American spouse to become a PR of Canada. Now we know that you can maintain your Canadian PR-ness by living with your Canadian spouse, even outside of Canada.

So this begs the question, is there any reason why someone who is living in the U.S. cannot sponsor their spouse as a PR and then the fact that they live together, although perhaps have never lived in Canada, would suffice for the American to maintain their Canadian residency for PR purposes.

Hmmm...interesting. This morning I was reading the links Kathryn provided and wondered about the time between sending the application and actually receiving the PR visa. It will be a few more years before we can actually physically cross the border BUT...if I can accrue PR time towards citizenship...makes me wonder if we should go ahead in the next year or so and apply. IF this is possible of course...

Wish those forums were more active...would make getting an answer to one's question much easier. :)

KnJ, do you know where you found the information or who you talked to that gave you this information?


Teaching is the essential profession...the one that makes ALL other professions possible - David Haselkorn

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Canada
Timeline

OhNOeS, now that you all know, there won't be room for MY spouse : P

So this begs the question, is there any reason why someone who is living in the U.S. cannot sponsor their spouse as a PR and then the fact that they live together, although perhaps have never lived in Canada, would suffice for the American to maintain their Canadian residency for PR purposes.

KnJ, do you know where you found the information or who you talked to that gave you this information?

trailmix -- apparently yes

bertiemae -- a friend, who for a living helps people with immigration to Canada. Not a lawyer, but someone who works with the system and reads about the process all the time.

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Canada
Timeline

My husband and I are actually finishing up the Canadian Immigration process next Friday. We did it from in Canada. Aparently if you apply outside of Canada it is a lot faster. (hind site is 20/20) After reading the Canada Immigration website (it's the only one we knew of and it was actually very informative), this was our experience.

My husband arrived in June 2007, we got married in July 2007. His visitor visa was to expire on December 2007. Now we could not directly apply for extension of his visa because his original intent for visiting was visiting. So we drove down to the border and 'flag-poled' . Basically crossed into the US and then back into Canada. We stated to the POE officer that we would be immigrating my husband into Canada, he then granted us a one year visitor's visa.

You do gather everything that they ask for, the only thing I recommend is do not do the medical ahead of time. We had to do medicals twice for my husband. (if you are applying in Canada due to the time it can sometimes take). Photo copy all evidence and proof of relationship, photos, chat logs, everything you send them. Then you wait.

We sent in the first package in May 2008. During our wait we had to reapply for an extension and a work visa. As long as you've sent in your package and paid the first fee you can apply for extension and work visa on the same form. And always apply for it 60 days before you visa expires.

We received his extension approval and his work visa in January 2009. Applied for his SIN card and he got a job. (he was getting very antsy) And then we waited some more. During this time we decided that moving to the US would be better option and started that process in May 2009. However, we then heard more from the Canadian Immigration via website and letter that they were looking for the medical. This was in June 2009. They needed the medical information or they would pull his visa status. So we did another medical cause the other won had expired by this time (good for one year).

We sent it in and waited again. We received our letter two days after our interview letter with the US consulate. So on October 16, 2009 we go down to the Immigration office, pay our fees hand over some pictures and badda bing badda boom. Canadian Immigration PR card done. One year and five months.

We opted to keep taking this route for a few reasons, first and foremost, so he could stay in Canada with me. Second is that the PR card is valid for 5 years and while you are living with your spouse, no matter where.

However, in order for him to apply for citizenship he would have to spend three years in Canada.

The Canadian Immigration process was a long waiting game but I think a lot less stressful and easier than the American Immigration.

Edited by Avery

Helen Keller: “A happy life consists not in the absence, but in the mastery of hardships.”

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Filed: Country: Canada
Timeline

Lots of good information there! Thanks! Yeah, I have to agree with you on the ease...it does seem easier than US Immigration especially if done from outside Canada. Although I have to admit, the only stressful moment was the FBI namecheck process during our AOS...my hubby was in name check for 9 months.


Teaching is the essential profession...the one that makes ALL other professions possible - David Haselkorn

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Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Canada
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maybe this forum http://www.roadtocanada.com/

I spoke to a specialist - there's no equivalent to fiance(e) but there is a conjugal, commonlaw, and spousal process. It's possible to get a fiance(e) in if there is some extenuating circumstances that prevents living together and/or marriage. The advice I was given is to marry and apply.

I don't understand this completely, but I was also told to apply to Canada after we get married in the US, to get that process started in case we do want to do the reverse in the future, or run into problems with the US process. There is something in there about the non Canadian being able to build residency by living with a Canadian citizen in a marriage even though they aren't physically in Canada. Don't ask me to explain it more because I don't know more : )

This is an interesting question really.

So scenario - say someone is living in the U.S. with their American spouse and they put in an application for said American spouse to become a PR of Canada. Now we know that you can maintain your Canadian PR-ness by living with your Canadian spouse, even outside of Canada.

So this begs the question, is there any reason why someone who is living in the U.S. cannot sponsor their spouse as a PR and then the fact that they live together, although perhaps have never lived in Canada, would suffice for the American to maintain their Canadian residency for PR purposes.

Hmmm...interesting. This morning I was reading the links Kathryn provided and wondered about the time between sending the application and actually receiving the PR visa. It will be a few more years before we can actually physically cross the border BUT...if I can accrue PR time towards citizenship...makes me wonder if we should go ahead in the next year or so and apply. IF this is possible of course...

Wish those forums were more active...would make getting an answer to one's question much easier. :)

KnJ, do you know where you found the information or who you talked to that gave you this information?

Unfortunately, it does not count towards citizenship. Citizenship requires physical presence in Canada to apply for. You can keep your PR status, though.


Montreal: BEAT!!! Approved!!!!!

event.png

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
Timeline

From my past experience working with Canadian immigration and my personal experiences with US immigration and from this website, the Canadian immigration process is faster, better organized, easier to complete and comply with and cheaper. While there is no fiance visa, there is also no conditional PR status and no removal of conditions. All of the fees are paid at once, no nickel and diming you throughout the process with yet another application and more money. You are allowed to visit in Canada and you can apply either in Canada or from outside of Canada - whatever way you go you are not separated for long periods of time like you are in the American process. You can come and go during the process and won't be 'abandoning' your application if you do so. While the Canadian process does have a financial sponsorship aspect, the requirement is 'waived' for spousal applicants so you don't need to have a minimum income level. As well, you can apply for citizenship after 3 years of Permanent Residency but you can also count up to two years of the time before you became a PR as long as you had legal status in Canada towards that citizenship at a rate of 50% - so you can conceivably get your PR status and only need 2 additional years before you can apply for citizenship. The processing time is about the same for the 'first' level of immigration process if you are going to the States - but for Canada, that is also the complete process.


“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

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