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JuneFirst

IRS Backtaxes + CR1 = Problems ??

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It could be an issue.

There was a post here about a similar situation. They (the consulate) basically subtracted the amount owed to the IRS from the income level, and they fell below the needed amount. (if I remember correctly).

I really think it depends on the CO checking your case.

(the feds tend to look out for each other (USCIS/State/IRS))


My Advice is usually based on "Worst Case Scenario" and what is written in the rules/laws/instructions. That is the way I roll... -Protect your Status - file before your I-94 expires.

WARNING: Phrases in this post may sound meaner than they were intended to be. Read the Adjudicator's Field Manual from USCIS

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Hi,

I think you guys should be worried, because it could be an issue, and even a reason for denial. I know that the I-864 is a very important factor in the CR1 process, and they do look at it fairly closely.

:unsure:

We have hired a tax attorny who will help us to set up a payment-plan for those taxes.

Is there anything else we can do to avoid getting problems due to those back-taxes?

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Hi,

I think you guys should be worried, because it could be an issue, and even a reason for denial. I know that the I-864 is a very important factor in the CR1 process, and they do look at it fairly closely.

:unsure:

We have hired a tax attorny who will help us to set up a payment-plan for those taxes.

Is there anything else we can do to avoid getting problems due to those back-taxes?

You very likely just wasted money on that tax attorney. You could have just called the IRS yourself on the phone and they would have been more than happy to help you set up a payment plan that would work with your budget. :star:

I did this before in the past. I owed them a few thousand (less than 5k I believe), called them up on the phone and the lady that assisted me was very helpful and polite. She asked me what I could afford to pay each month and then set my payment to them at a little lower than that just to make sure that it would not be a problem for me. She explained that I could pay more towards my debt at any time I wished... They also sent me an invoice/statement each month that reflected all of the parments received and the current balance owed... The IRS is only concerned about getting their money. They WILL very readily work out a payment plan for anyone that is attempting to pay their past due taxes and they do not charge anything extra for doing this. The panalties and interest you still have to pay but a tax attorney can't make these charges 'magically' disappear...

It is a common misconception to belive that a tax attorney can make some of your IRS debt just 'go away' or be forgiven... It makes for a good commercial on TV but in reality, this is a very difficult thing to do... You must PROVE a serious hardship and inability to pay before the IRS will even consider reducing a debt owed to them... :whistle:

The IRS does not really 'need' to negotiate a debt settlement to get their money from a person. They have the power to just come and 'take it' from you. They are not as likely to reduce a debt the way that a credit card company would.

Hope you did not spend much on the tax attorney for something you could have easily done yourself...

:thumbs:

Edited by DobermanGuy

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Hi,

I think you guys should be worried, because it could be an issue, and even a reason for denial. I know that the I-864 is a very important factor in the CR1 process, and they do look at it fairly closely.

:unsure:

We have hired a tax attorny who will help us to set up a payment-plan for those taxes.

Is there anything else we can do to avoid getting problems due to those back-taxes?

You very likely just wasted money on that tax attorney. You could have just called the IRS yourself on the phone and they would have been more than happy to help you set up a payment plan that would work with your budget. :star:

I did this before in the past. I owed them a few thousand (less than 5k I believe), called them up on the phone and the lady that assisted me was very helpful and polite. She asked me what I could afford to pay each month and then set my payment to them at a little lower than that just to make sure that it would not be a problem for me. She explained that I could pay more towards my debt at any time I wished... They also sent me an invoice/statement each month that reflected all of the parments received and the current balance owed... The IRS is only concerned about getting their money. They WILL very readily work out a payment plan for anyone that is attempting to pay their past due taxes and they do not charge anything extra for doing this. The panalties and interest you still have to pay but a tax attorney can't make these charges 'magically' disappear...

It is a common misconception to belive that a tax attorney can make some of your IRS debt just 'go away' or be forgiven... It makes for a good commercial on TV but in reality, this is a very difficult thing to do... You must PROVE a serious hardship and inability to pay before the IRS will even consider reducing a debt owed to them... :whistle:

The IRS does not really 'need' to negotiate a debt settlement to get their money from a person. They have the power to just come and 'take it' from you. They are not as likely to reduce a debt the way that a credit card company would.

Hope you did not spend much on the tax attorney for something you could have easily done yourself...

:thumbs:

If you manage to set up a payment plan, and your I-864 is already approved in NVC, think the consulate would still scrutinize it and deny the visa?

was there ever a case like this?

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Filed: Timeline
Hi,

I think you guys should be worried, because it could be an issue, and even a reason for denial. I know that the I-864 is a very important factor in the CR1 process, and they do look at it fairly closely.

:unsure:

We have hired a tax attorny who will help us to set up a payment-plan for those taxes.

Is there anything else we can do to avoid getting problems due to those back-taxes?

You very likely just wasted money on that tax attorney. You could have just called the IRS yourself on the phone and they would have been more than happy to help you set up a payment plan that would work with your budget. :star:

I did this before in the past. I owed them a few thousand (less than 5k I believe), called them up on the phone and the lady that assisted me was very helpful and polite. She asked me what I could afford to pay each month and then set my payment to them at a little lower than that just to make sure that it would not be a problem for me. She explained that I could pay more towards my debt at any time I wished... They also sent me an invoice/statement each month that reflected all of the parments received and the current balance owed... The IRS is only concerned about getting their money. They WILL very readily work out a payment plan for anyone that is attempting to pay their past due taxes and they do not charge anything extra for doing this. The panalties and interest you still have to pay but a tax attorney can't make these charges 'magically' disappear...

It is a common misconception to belive that a tax attorney can make some of your IRS debt just 'go away' or be forgiven... It makes for a good commercial on TV but in reality, this is a very difficult thing to do... You must PROVE a serious hardship and inability to pay before the IRS will even consider reducing a debt owed to them... :whistle:

The IRS does not really 'need' to negotiate a debt settlement to get their money from a person. They have the power to just come and 'take it' from you. They are not as likely to reduce a debt the way that a credit card company would.

Hope you did not spend much on the tax attorney for something you could have easily done yourself...

:thumbs:

If you manage to set up a payment plan, and your I-864 is already approved in NVC, think the consulate would still scrutinize it and deny the visa?

was there ever a case like this?

Good question!

Well, we were told to hire an attorny because it could save us alot?

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Filed: Timeline
Hi,

I think you guys should be worried, because it could be an issue, and even a reason for denial. I know that the I-864 is a very important factor in the CR1 process, and they do look at it fairly closely.

:unsure:

We have hired a tax attorny who will help us to set up a payment-plan for those taxes.

Is there anything else we can do to avoid getting problems due to those back-taxes?

You very likely just wasted money on that tax attorney. You could have just called the IRS yourself on the phone and they would have been more than happy to help you set up a payment plan that would work with your budget. :star:

I did this before in the past. I owed them a few thousand (less than 5k I believe), called them up on the phone and the lady that assisted me was very helpful and polite. She asked me what I could afford to pay each month and then set my payment to them at a little lower than that just to make sure that it would not be a problem for me. She explained that I could pay more towards my debt at any time I wished... They also sent me an invoice/statement each month that reflected all of the parments received and the current balance owed... The IRS is only concerned about getting their money. They WILL very readily work out a payment plan for anyone that is attempting to pay their past due taxes and they do not charge anything extra for doing this. The panalties and interest you still have to pay but a tax attorney can't make these charges 'magically' disappear...

It is a common misconception to belive that a tax attorney can make some of your IRS debt just 'go away' or be forgiven... It makes for a good commercial on TV but in reality, this is a very difficult thing to do... You must PROVE a serious hardship and inability to pay before the IRS will even consider reducing a debt owed to them... :whistle:

The IRS does not really 'need' to negotiate a debt settlement to get their money from a person. They have the power to just come and 'take it' from you. They are not as likely to reduce a debt the way that a credit card company would.

Hope you did not spend much on the tax attorney for something you could have easily done yourself...

:thumbs:

If you manage to set up a payment plan, and your I-864 is already approved in NVC, think the consulate would still scrutinize it and deny the visa?

was there ever a case like this?

Good question!

Well, we were told to hire an attorny because it could save us alot?

If you go to a bankruptcy lawyer, He will TELL you that you need to file even if you are NOT broke. Why? Because he wants your money...

If you go to a divorce lawyer, They will tell you that you NEED a divorce even if councelling would have helped save the marriage. Why? Because they want your money...

If you go to a tax attorney... You get the idea here right???

Tax lawyers are great if you are being audited. I would quickly suggest one to you if that were the case here...

You are NOT being audited and you are only looking to set up a payment plan for taxes that you know that you already owe. The IRS will set up this plan for you at NO CHARGE and they will work with you so that it falls within your budget...

The stuff you see on TV about these tax lawyers making debt 'disappear' is NOT entirely true. Just because it was on TV does not make it real. The key word here is 'advertisment'.

The IRS is not generally in the buisiness of writing off legitimate debt that is owed to them. They have the power and the resources to collect and it is not in their interest to negotiate. If you had a terminal illness or if you could PROVE that you were somehow unable to repay the debt, They 'might' be willing to talk with you and make an adjustment perhaps forgiving some of your debt...

In my opinion, That Tax Lawyer just wants your money. He is very unlikey to be able to actually reduce your debt unless you can prove a serious hardship. The money that you waste getting him to do what you could easily do on your own just by calling the IRS yourself could perhaps make a few of your debt payments to them instead of lining the lawyers pocket or putting gas in his car... :whistle:

Ask him what his fees are and then consider how much of the debt you could pay off with that money... :thumbs:

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Russia
Timeline

The above advice is generally correct, you do not need attorney. If he truly has significant debt, you need another route.

The IRS will reduce the debt if you can prove your inability to pay and you do not have the assets to offset the debt. This is called an offer of compromise and you apply by filing form 656 from the IRS. This is what your attorney will use. It makes the K1 or K3 visa process application look like a "walk in the park"-expect your application to be a couple inches thick upon completion because of all the documentation needed. Cost is less than $200 but if you do the application wrong, the money is kept and your application is denied. When you resubmit, it is another application fee.

If you hired a tax attorney, this is the route he will also use to submit to IRS, he just has more experience.

Example, say you SO owes $400,000 and makes $40K/year. He has no significant assets, say $50K. He would be expected to either liquidate the $50K in assets and pay addition monthly for assets. They can make you pay for up to 10 years since the day of the lien. Say after normal expenses for living, he has $500/month. He would be required to pay $500/month for 120 months plus the value of his assets or a total of $60,000 plus the $50K in assets. The lien would stay until the end of the payment period.

Good news, you would have the documentation needed to prove you are on an accepted payment plan and most likely, would be approved.

Edited by john and natalya

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hey u dont need to waste the money on attorney. just goto www.irs.gov and u can set up ur payment plan or u can just visit the local irs office to do the same thing. CO will never ask u about the money u owe in back taxes. as long as u make over the poverty line and thats all is the matter in visa process. good luck. abby n sheryl


Our time line for CR1 visa took only 5 months and 1 week or 156 days; from the filing the I-130 on the 03-12-2009 to Approval of NOA2 on the 05/13/2009, then Interview on the 08/18/2009 at Manila, Philippines. We had a daughter on the 11-12-2010 named AISHA JOY means HAPPY LIFE.a1_opt-1.jpga2_opt-1.jpga3_opt-1.jpg

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hey u dont need to waste the money on attorney. just goto www.irs.gov and u can set up ur payment plan or u can just visit the local irs office to do the same thing. CO will never ask u about the money u owe in back taxes. as long as u make over the poverty line and thats all is the matter in visa process. good luck. abby n sheryl

well, an attonry can help to reduce the interest & penalty,right?

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I was on a payment plan and it was never mentioned in either the K1 interview or the AOS. Of course I got on the plan after submitting my taxes and realized I did not whithold correctly for self employment taxes.

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: China
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My "husband" (not yet :star: ) owns the IRS quit a bit of money.

He does make enough money to sponsor me but we worry that those back-taxes could cause a visa denial/problems.

Do we worry to much?

I would worry. another easy reason to deny you

good luck


comicirsaudit.jpg

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hey u dont need to waste the money on attorney. just goto www.irs.gov and u can set up ur payment plan or u can just visit the local irs office to do the same thing. CO will never ask u about the money u owe in back taxes. as long as u make over the poverty line and thats all is the matter in visa process. good luck. abby n sheryl

well, an attonry can help to reduce the interest & penalty,right?

NO... But they can help lighten your wallet if you are not smart! :whistle:

The IRS can take ALL your assets and they do not NEED to bargain with you to get what they want...

There is no 'statute of limitations' or other law preventing them from hounding you until the day you die. They CAN and WILL take what they feel is owed to them and unless you are terminally ill or SEVERELY disabled to the point that you can simply not afford to pay up... They WILL get their money... The tax attorney will get your money as well if you are unwise as to their practices and the tax laws currenty in place... The lawyer wants your money!!! When in doubt, get a second opinion from someone that is NOT a lawyer and NOT interested in taking your money... :whistle:

I feel sorry for you because you fell for an advertisement on TV...

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