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JasonandJeizel

HELP...Family name on birth certificate spells wrong.

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I am planning to file a petition for my sister to come here soon, and we have same mother and father, but on her birth certificate her family name spells Colango and mine is Colanggo. Is it gonna affect the petition? Please need your help. Thanks

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Posted (edited)

My wife had that problem, last name Sumile but her birth certificate said Sumili for her, Sumile for her parents.

 

She thought she'd fixed it several years earlier, but her application for a Philippine passport was rejected because of it.  It took another 3 months in 2016 to get it fixed & get the passport.

 

So we filed for the fiance visa, she brought a police clearance for Sumile to the interview. 

 

Visa approval was delayed a few weeks until the embassy received & processed the police clearance for Sumili.

 

So:

  1. Have your sister get her birth certificate corrected.
  2. Have your sister get a Philippine passport, that way you'll know there are no issues regarding her name
  3. As someone above pointed out, this might be a long time off, but when the time comes she should come prepared with police clearances for both names.
Edited by Mike V
spelling

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, apple21 said:

FYI sibling petitions for Philippines will take more than 20 years. 

 

 

And just as an example of an alternate strategy to speed things things up, my wife has 7 siblings, of which only 1 or 2 are young enough that they might benefit by moving here in 25+ years.  But they all have children.

 

It only costs $200-250 a month to put a Philippine kid through college in the Philippines.  At a certain point, that child will be able to find employment here and eventually sponsor his/her parents.  Just make sure that the kid majors in something that is in demand here (e.g. physical/occupational therapy, special education/math/science teachers).

 

Currently we have 3 of our own still in the PHilippines in college.  As they finish school and my wife can afford it, she plans to put selected nieces/nephews through college in the Philippines.  Figure on 5 years of college (advance degree desirable) and a couple years experience.  Those ~7 years will be much shorter than the normal 20-25 years to sponsor a sibling.

Edited by Mike V
spelling :(

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Mike V

IF they can find an employer who would file an work visa for them. No guarantee on that. Let's say they succeed, they have to wait 5 yrs to become a US citizen to file for their parents. Once parents gets the GC, the older kids will be over 21 and they will wait 10+ yrs under F2B category (assuming they are single/unmarried). There's also a waiting time for employment visas unless they have extra ordinary talents. 

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2 hours ago, apple21 said:

Mike V

IF they can find an employer who would file an work visa for them. No guarantee on that. Let's say they succeed, they have to wait 5 yrs to become a US citizen to file for their parents. Once parents gets the GC, the older kids will be over 21 and they will wait 10+ yrs under F2B category (assuming they are single/unmarried). There's also a waiting time for employment visas unless they have extra ordinary talents. 

No guarantee, but in our case, one is a physical therapy major, a 2nd in special education.  Both are in high demand here.  The 3rd one just changed his major to English & recently broke up with his girl friend the optometry major; we need to have a chat with him.

 

But you're right on the wait time, as only citizens can sponsor parents.  That does add 5 years, but the odds for the family overall are still much better.  If they have to wait 25 years for my wife to sponsor them as siblings, by the time they get here, their kids will be mostly/all > 21, and it will take another 10-25 years to get them here.

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