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z2790

I-134F Co-sponsor retiring

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Posted (edited)

My fiancée and I (the petitioner) have ran into a bit of a snag in regards to our K1 case, we (finally) are preparing for our interview (yay). However, we've hit a bit of a snag regarding the i-134f, as I am a student and require a co-sponsor. Luckily, my dad was gracious enough to say he'd do it. He is currently making above 125%. 

However, he retires in April and our interview won't be until June can we still use pay stubs or a tax return? Obviously, due to his retirement we won't have pay stubs for the months between his retirement and his interview. He's not sure the amount he'll be drawing in the form of a pension so that brings me to my second question of: 

Can we use savings? Is there any penalty for using savings? What proof is required to use it? Is London picky in regards to this?

Edited by z2790

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London does allow you to self sponsor.

 

Tax return yes, income and savings would be those relevant at the time of the interview.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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6 minutes ago, z2790 said:

My fiancée and I (the petitioner) have ran into a bit of a snag in regards to our K1 case, we (finally) are preparing for our interview (yay). However, we've hit a bit of a snag regarding the i-134f, as I am a student and require a co-sponsor. Luckily, my dad was gracious enough to say he'd do it. He is currently making above 125%. 

However, he retires in April and our interview won't be until June can we still use pay stubs or a tax return? Obviously, due to his retirement we won't have pay stubs for the months between his retirement and his interview. He's not sure the amount he'll be drawing in the form of a pension so that brings me to my second question of: 

Can we use savings? Is there any penalty for using savings? What proof is required to use it? Is London picky in regards to this?

Yes, you could use your saving. Here is the Part 7 Item 10 on your I-864 instruction:

 

Item Number 10. Total Value of Assets. In order to qualify based on the value of your assets, the total value of your
assets must equal at least five times the difference between your total household income and the current Federal Poverty
Guidelines for your household size. However, if you are a U.S. citizen and you are sponsoring your spouse or child age
18 years of age or older, the total value of your assets must only be equal to at least three times the difference. If the
intending immigrant is a foreign national orphan who will be adopted in the United States after he or she acquires legal
permanent residence, and who will, as a result, acquire citizenship under section 320 of the INA, the total value of your
assets need only equal the difference.


Example of How to Use Assets: If you are petitioning for a parent and the poverty line for your household size is
$22,062 and your current income is $18,062, the difference between your current income and the poverty line is $4,000.
In order for assets to help you qualify, the combination of your assets, plus the assets of any household member who is
signing Form I-864A, plus any available assets of the sponsored immigrant, would have to equal five times this difference
(5 x $4,000). In this case, you would meet the income requirements if the net value of the assets equaled at least $20,000.

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4 hours ago, Boiler said:

London does allow you to self sponsor.

 

Tax return yes, income and savings would be those relevant at the time of the interview.

We don't have enough to self sponsor hence why we are using my father as a cosponsor. I'm not sure if I worded my question correctly but we wanted to know if instead of using income, we could use his savings in his bank (which is over the 125% poverty line). Thanks.

 

4 hours ago, samuelam said:

Yes, you could use your saving. Here is the Part 7 Item 10 on your I-864 instruction:

 

Item Number 10. Total Value of Assets. In order to qualify based on the value of your assets, the total value of your
assets must equal at least five times the difference between your total household income and the current Federal Poverty
Guidelines for your household size. However, if you are a U.S. citizen and you are sponsoring your spouse or child age
18 years of age or older, the total value of your assets must only be equal to at least three times the difference. If the
intending immigrant is a foreign national orphan who will be adopted in the United States after he or she acquires legal
permanent residence, and who will, as a result, acquire citizenship under section 320 of the INA, the total value of your
assets need only equal the difference.


Example of How to Use Assets: If you are petitioning for a parent and the poverty line for your household size is
$22,062 and your current income is $18,062, the difference between your current income and the poverty line is $4,000.
In order for assets to help you qualify, the combination of your assets, plus the assets of any household member who is
signing Form I-864A, plus any available assets of the sponsored immigrant, would have to equal five times this difference
(5 x $4,000). In this case, you would meet the income requirements if the net value of the assets equaled at least $20,000.

I thought that "savings" weren't calculated like assets of property were? Could we not just show a statement from the bank detailing the amount he has within his account OR do we really need to show three times the amount? That would be around $60,000 for a household of 4 people correct?

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24 minutes ago, z2790 said:

We don't have enough to self sponsor hence why we are using my father as a cosponsor. I'm not sure if I worded my question correctly but we wanted to know if instead of using income, we could use his savings in his bank (which is over the 125% poverty line). Thanks.

 

I thought that "savings" weren't calculated like assets of property were? Could we not just show a statement from the bank detailing the amount he has within his account OR do we really need to show three times the amount? That would be around $60,000 for a household of 4 people correct?

I'm planning as a co-sponsor for my brother-in-law. 

 

I found this link: explain I-864 using asset.

 

https://www.***removed***/affidavit-of-support/using-assets-meet-income-requirements.html

 

Let me know if you have questions 

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13 hours ago, z2790 said:

My fiancée and I (the petitioner) have ran into a bit of a snag in regards to our K1 case, we (finally) are preparing for our interview (yay). However, we've hit a bit of a snag regarding the i-134f, as I am a student and require a co-sponsor. Luckily, my dad was gracious enough to say he'd do it. He is currently making above 125%. 

However, he retires in April and our interview won't be until June can we still use pay stubs or a tax return? Obviously, due to his retirement we won't have pay stubs for the months between his retirement and his interview. He's not sure the amount he'll be drawing in the form of a pension so that brings me to my second question of: 

Can we use savings? Is there any penalty for using savings? What proof is required to use it? Is London picky in regards to this?

I had my interview Friday at London and all the asked for was the I134 form and 2017 tax return. So you should be fine I think 

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Posted (edited)

This is in lieu of a private response to your fiancé.

 

Household of four needs a sponsor who makes $32,187. See this for the guidelines https://www.uscis.gov/i-864p

i assume you are fully supported by your dad?  London as approved K1s on on only the 100% figure, not the 125%. 

 

Assets can include his cash savings, money in a checking account, stocks/bond values, money market accounts, or even real estate.

Any use of assets by someone other than the fiancé or spouse has to be FIVE times what is short on salary.

 

Your father will get a pension statement from HR before retiring saying how much he will get. Or he can ask for one. You can use that at the interview just like an employer letter. Anytime you read "employer letter" in a post, substitute in "pension statement from HR". Anytime you read "salary", substitute in "pension". Got it? 

 

So let's say pension total will be $22,187 per year. He falls short of the "salary" needed by $10,000. So he needs to come up with FIVE times $10,000 in assets to make up for that part he falls short.  Now this is the rule of the stricter affidavit of support I-864. For a K1 in London the only written law in the Foreign Affairs Manual is the officer has to be convince your fiancé will not become a public charge. It is really subjective.  (And note--the link provided to you to the website** Im mi help ** does not apply to a fiancé or I-134. That is for spouse visas or when your fiancé applies for her greencard after marriage.)

 

Evidence accepted for a K1 in London.

No, pay stubs are not a requirement. I know your fiancé was concerned Dad would not have pension pay stubs yet. Not needed. He'll have a statement from HR saying how much his pension will be. London will take anything that proves income for a K1 visa. They do not demand a specific proof. Some use tax return. Some use employer letter. (Did you sub in pension statement then? Just checking.) Some have been approved on only a W2 without a tax return. One said he just showed one pay stub. Anything is okay. 

 

So your dad provides a pension statement from HR. It won't reach the mark. To prove his assets he can provide a recent bank, savings, or financial investment statement. He may get statements from Edward Jones, Merrill Lynch, or another financial firm detailing the current value of his stock/bond investments. Do the math and see if he will have enough. And keep in mind the officer can approve if he thinks it's close enough and your fiancé will not become a public charge. It is subjective. 

Edited by Wuozopo

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Something to think about, but K1 has a long period before you can work and nobody seems to have income.


“If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.”

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On 3/20/2019 at 2:04 AM, Wuozopo said:

This is in lieu of a private response to your fiancé.

 

Household of four needs a sponsor who makes $32,187. See this for the guidelines https://www.uscis.gov/i-864p

i assume you are fully supported by your dad?  London as approved K1s on on only the 100% figure, not the 125%. 

 

Assets can include his cash savings, money in a checking account, stocks/bond values, money market accounts, or even real estate.

Any use of assets by someone other than the fiancé or spouse has to be FIVE times what is short on salary.

 

Your father will get a pension statement from HR before retiring saying how much he will get. Or he can ask for one. You can use that at the interview just like an employer letter. Anytime you read "employer letter" in a post, substitute in "pension statement from HR". Anytime you read "salary", substitute in "pension". Got it? 

 

So let's say pension total will be $22,187 per year. He falls short of the "salary" needed by $10,000. So he needs to come up with FIVE times $10,000 in assets to make up for that part he falls short.  Now this is the rule of the stricter affidavit of support I-864. For a K1 in London the only written law in the Foreign Affairs Manual is the officer has to be convince your fiancé will not become a public charge. It is really subjective.  (And note--the link provided to you to the website** Im mi help ** does not apply to a fiancé or I-134. That is for spouse visas or when your fiancé applies for her greencard after marriage.)

 

Evidence accepted for a K1 in London.

No, pay stubs are not a requirement. I know your fiancé was concerned Dad would not have pension pay stubs yet. Not needed. He'll have a statement from HR saying how much his pension will be. London will take anything that proves income for a K1 visa. They do not demand a specific proof. Some use tax return. Some use employer letter. (Did you sub in pension statement then? Just checking.) Some have been approved on only a W2 without a tax return. One said he just showed one pay stub. Anything is okay. 

 

So your dad provides a pension statement from HR. It won't reach the mark. To prove his assets he can provide a recent bank, savings, or financial investment statement. He may get statements from Edward Jones, Merrill Lynch, or another financial firm detailing the current value of his stock/bond investments. Do the math and see if he will have enough. And keep in mind the officer can approve if he thinks it's close enough and your fiancé will not become a public charge. It is subjective. 

@Wuozopo Thank you! Much appreciated as always :) 

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