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Grassley Proposes Widespread Civil Forfeiture Reform

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Grassley Proposes Widespread Civil Forfeiture Reform

A system that allows the government to seize personal property without proving it was obtained through criminal activity would face a massive overhaul under a bill to be introduced Thursday by Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley.

Known as The Due Process Act, law enforcement would face far steeper requirements to show that seized property is linked to crime; allows people to recover attorney fees in cases where the government settles or drops forfeiture claims; and gives judges greater latitude to reduce the size of a forfeiture penalty based on factors such as seriousness of an offense or culpability of a claimant.

Story continues here: http://www.press-citizen.com/story/news/politics/2016/06/08/grassley-proposes-widespread-civil-forfeiture-reform/85611944/


06-04-2007 = TSC stamps postal return-receipt for I-129f.

06-11-2007 = NOA1 date (unknown to me).

07-20-2007 = Phoned Immigration Officer; got WAC#; where's NOA1?

09-25-2007 = Touch (first-ever).

09-28-2007 = NOA1, 23 days after their 45-day promise to send it (grrrr).

10-20 & 11-14-2007 = Phoned ImmOffs; "still pending."

12-11-2007 = 180 days; file is "between workstations, may be early Jan."; touches 12/11 & 12/12.

12-18-2007 = Call; file is with Division 9 ofcr. (bckgrnd check); e-prompt to shake it; touch.

12-19-2007 = NOA2 by e-mail & web, dated 12-18-07 (187 days; 201 per VJ); in mail 12/24/07.

01-09-2008 = File from USCIS to NVC, 1-4-08; NVC creates file, 1/15/08; to consulate 1/16/08.

01-23-2008 = Consulate gets file; outdated Packet 4 mailed to fiancee 1/27/08; rec'd 3/3/08.

04-29-2008 = Fiancee's 4-min. consular interview, 8:30 a.m.; much evidence brought but not allowed to be presented (consul: "More proof! Second interview! Bring your fiance!").

05-05-2008 = Infuriating $12 call to non-English-speaking consulate appointment-setter.

05-06-2008 = Better $12 call to English-speaker; "joint" interview date 6/30/08 (my selection).

06-30-2008 = Stokes Interrogations w/Ecuadorian (not USC); "wait 2 weeks; we'll mail her."

07-2008 = Daily calls to DOS: "currently processing"; 8/05 = Phoned consulate, got Section Chief; wrote him.

08-07-08 = E-mail from consulate, promising to issue visa "as soon as we get her passport" (on 8/12, per DHL).

08-27-08 = Phoned consulate (they "couldn't find" our file); visa DHL'd 8/28; in hand 9/1; through POE on 10/9 with NO hassles(!).

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Several Iowa attorneys who represent clients whose property has been taken by law enforcement said the legislation, if passed by Congress, is an important step. But they also caution that federal changes shouldn’t fool the public into thinking the problem is resolved.

Most states have their own forfeiture laws, which Grassley’s proposal doesn’t change. Of the $43 million noted in the Register’s investigation, only about half were attributed to federal forfeitures.

“I’m not saying this isn’t an important step. It is. But it’s just not a fix,” said Des Moines attorney Glen Downey. “There’s lot of good things about what is being proposed, but nothing in that bill changes Iowa’s practices.”

imo, not at all good enough.

http://www.ij.org/report/policing-for-profit/

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Just wondering. When we talk police abuse and corruption, you act like it's a foreign language off the coast of Palau

A Palau. Did I tell you about the time I went diving with the wifey just off one of the tiny islands in Palau. She got into a bit of bother, but I rescued her, coz I'm fluent in Palauen yanno.

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Oklahoma Police Just Made It Easier Than Ever To Seize Someone’s Money

BY BRYCE COVERTbird_blue_16.png JUN 9, 2016 11:55 AM




shutterstock_326490722-1024x683.jpg

CREDIT: SHUTTERSTOCK






If an Oklahoman who uses a prepaid debit credit card gets pulled over, he now runs the risk that police take all of the money he’s loaded onto the card without having to arrest him or get a warrant.


The state’s Department of Public Safety recently bought and installed 16 portable devices that police can carry in their cars and that allow them to scan prepaid debit cards and gift cards and seize any funds, as well as freeze the funds. The scanners can also obtain and keep some account information — including the name on the card, card number, issuer, and expiration date — from other kinds of cards, such as regular debit cards an credit cards.


Highway patrollers are supposed to use the devices when they suspect someone of having money obtained through drug trafficking. The department says they are targeting the increasing use of prepaid cards by drug dealers.



We’re gonna look for different factors in the way that you’re acting

But the criteria for how police determine whether someone’s funds should be seized are a bit fuzzy. A trooper can simply suspect someone has money on a card tied to some kind of crime to justify the seizure.


“We’re gonna look for different factors in the way that you’re acting,” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Lt. John Vincent told News 9. “We’re gonna look for if there’s a difference in your story. If there’s someway that we can prove that you’re falsifying information to us about your business.”


“If we have reasonable suspicion to believe there’s a crime being committed, we’re going to investigate that. If someone has 300 cards taped up and hidden inside the dash of a vehicle, we’re going to check that,” Vincent told Oklahoma Watch. “But if the person has proof that it belongs to him for legitimate reasons, there’s nothing going to happen. We won’t seize it.”


This builds on the vagueness of the state’s civil asset forfeiture laws in general. Oklahoma law only requires the department to prove that seized property is connected to a crime by a preponderance of evidence.



The content available on a site dedicated to bringing folks to America should not be promoting racial discord, euro-supremacy, discrimination based on religion , exclusion of groups from immigration based on where they were born, disenfranchisement of voters rights based on how they might vote.

horsey-change.jpg?w=336&h=265

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A Palau. Did I tell you about the time I went diving with the wifey just off one of the tiny islands in Palau. She got into a bit of bother, but I rescued her, coz I'm fluent in Palauen yanno.

But are you fluent in the other foreign language off of the coast of Palau?

Lol

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But are you fluent in the other foreign language off of the coast of Palau?

Lol

I'm a cunning linguist.

Oklahoma Police Just Made It Easier Than Ever To Seize Someones Money

BY BRYCE COVERTbird_blue_16.png JUN 9, 2016 11:55 AM

shutterstock_326490722-1024x683.jpg

CREDIT: SHUTTERSTOCK

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If an Oklahoman who uses a prepaid debit credit card gets pulled over, he now runs the risk that police take all of the money hes loaded onto the card without having to arrest him or get a warrant.

The states Department of Public Safety recently bought and installed 16 portable devices that police can carry in their cars and that allow them to scan prepaid debit cards and gift cards and seize any funds, as well as freeze the funds. The scanners can also obtain and keep some account information including the name on the card, card number, issuer, and expiration date from other kinds of cards, such as regular debit cards an credit cards.

Highway patrollers are supposed to use the devices when they suspect someone of having money obtained through drug trafficking. The department says they are targeting the increasing use of prepaid cards by drug dealers.

Were gonna look for different factors in the way that youre acting

But the criteria for how police determine whether someones funds should be seized are a bit fuzzy. A trooper can simply suspect someone has money on a card tied to some kind of crime to justify the seizure.

Were gonna look for different factors in the way that youre acting, Oklahoma Highway Patrol Lt. John Vincent told News 9. Were gonna look for if theres a difference in your story. If theres someway that we can prove that youre falsifying information to us about your business.

If we have reasonable suspicion to believe theres a crime being committed, were going to investigate that. If someone has 300 cards taped up and hidden inside the dash of a vehicle, were going to check that, Vincent told Oklahoma Watch. But if the person has proof that it belongs to him for legitimate reasons, theres nothing going to happen. We wont seize it.

This builds on the vagueness of the states civil asset forfeiture laws in general. Oklahoma law only requires the department to prove that seized property is connected to a crime by a preponderance of evidence.

Wow.

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Oklahoma Police Just Made It Easier Than Ever To Seize Someones Money

BY BRYCE COVERTbird_blue_16.png JUN 9, 2016 11:55 AM

shutterstock_326490722-1024x683.jpg

CREDIT: SHUTTERSTOCK

Share

400

Tweet

If an Oklahoman who uses a prepaid debit credit card gets pulled over, he now runs the risk that police take all of the money hes loaded onto the card without having to arrest him or get a warrant.

The states Department of Public Safety recently bought and installed 16 portable devices that police can carry in their cars and that allow them to scan prepaid debit cards and gift cards and seize any funds, as well as freeze the funds. The scanners can also obtain and keep some account information including the name on the card, card number, issuer, and expiration date from other kinds of cards, such as regular debit cards an credit cards.

Highway patrollers are supposed to use the devices when they suspect someone of having money obtained through drug trafficking. The department says they are targeting the increasing use of prepaid cards by drug dealers.

Were gonna look for different factors in the way that youre acting

But the criteria for how police determine whether someones funds should be seized are a bit fuzzy. A trooper can simply suspect someone has money on a card tied to some kind of crime to justify the seizure.

Were gonna look for different factors in the way that youre acting, Oklahoma Highway Patrol Lt. John Vincent told News 9. Were gonna look for if theres a difference in your story. If theres someway that we can prove that youre falsifying information to us about your business.

If we have reasonable suspicion to believe theres a crime being committed, were going to investigate that. If someone has 300 cards taped up and hidden inside the dash of a vehicle, were going to check that, Vincent told Oklahoma Watch. But if the person has proof that it belongs to him for legitimate reasons, theres nothing going to happen. We wont seize it.

This builds on the vagueness of the states civil asset forfeiture laws in general. Oklahoma law only requires the department to prove that seized property is connected to a crime by a preponderance of evidence.

Yeap more ways to scam the average American all the way to the last penny. No paper trail but you can take someone's money while they sitting at a red light. This is insane

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you always win when you're learning ?

I have never been a fan of police overreach and clearly understand why minorities fear the police. In my ERA mom taught us to go to a policeman if in trouble.

The folks on the other side of town , ie the quarater, got drug out of the house and beat by the police if they didn't pay the slum lord on time.

Most on here have no idea what real racism is like.

However when some criminal like M Brown tried to kill a police officer for no reason and many in the black community back him, I think it turns the clock back.

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