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canaboy

Do the US/Canada customs share information?

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Filed: Country: Canada
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Earlier this year I visited the US, flew in from Canada (I’m canadian). So they stamped my passport which showed the days I’m allowed in, so 6 months from when I arrived.

I stayed in the US for about 5 1/2 months before flying back to Canada.

When I flew home I checked in with Delta, went through TSA and then on my way back home. I never went through any US customs, the only customs I went through was the Canadian customs when I landed in my home town. And they didn’t stamp my passport or anything showing I returned.

So I was wondering how does the US know now that I’ve left the country? If I try to return in the next couple months will they think I had never left or is there something that happens behind the scenes to let them know (Canada customs wise).

Thanks!

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Filed: Country: Philippines
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Earlier this year I visited the US, flew in from Canada (I’m canadian). So they stamped my passport which showed the days I’m allowed in, so 6 months from when I arrived.

I stayed in the US for about 5 1/2 months before flying back to Canada.

When I flew home I checked in with Delta, went through TSA and then on my way back home. I never went through any US customs, the only customs I went through was the Canadian customs when I landed in my home town. And they didn’t stamp my passport or anything showing I returned.

So I was wondering how does the US know now that I’ve left the country? If I try to return in the next couple months will they think I had never left or is there something that happens behind the scenes to let them know (Canada customs wise).

Thanks!

Yes, they do.

They have a slew of information available at their fingertips...not the least of which is when you leave/enter the US.

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I actually don't know the degree to which governments share this kind of information, but CBP knows about your U.S. exits through the airlines. The airlines share the flight manifests with the government so they have a list of who is on what flight. You can check your electronic I-94 to confirm this.

Although I would assume that these days the system is smart enough to know when a passenger checks in or fails to check in, that's not always the case. Multiple people here have looked up the U.S. arrival/departure history to find that it says they left the U.S. when in reality they never took their flight home. But because they had a ticket/reservation in their name the system processed it as if they did get on their flight.

With all of the record keeping you'd assume it did a better job of passengers' check-ins. Not to mention when you check in but miss the flight (remember you check in online or at the airline, pass through security, and then they scan your ticket right as you board the plane).

Edited by jxn

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I'm not saying I know this for a fact, but I doubt the U.S is notified when we leave the country. If so they would know of each and every person that has overstayed. I had never gotten stamps in my passport until my last 2 trips when they stamped it. I think it was just a precaution because I said I was visiting my fiance.

I know of many Canadians that spend more than 6 months in the U.S and have no problems reentering. I'm not saying we should do this, but the Canadian/US border is different from other countries. So many retirees spend their winters down south they are not very picky about overstays. The second article Torete shared is for the Canadian side to make sure Canadians are still eligible for benefits such as healthcare.

I doubt you will have issues crossing the border again, just make sure you bring proof of ties to Canada.


''No matter how painful distance can be, not having you in my life would be worse''

August 16 2013: Started dating

July 6 2014: Got engaged! (L)

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I'm not saying I know this for a fact, but I doubt the U.S is notified when we leave the country. If so they would know of each and every person that has overstayed. I had never gotten stamps in my passport until my last 2 trips when they stamped it. I think it was just a precaution because I said I was visiting my fiance.

I know of many Canadians that spend more than 6 months in the U.S and have no problems reentering. I'm not saying we should do this, but the Canadian/US border is different from other countries. So many retirees spend their winters down south they are not very picky about overstays. The second article Torete shared is for the Canadian side to make sure Canadians are still eligible for benefits such as healthcare.

I doubt you will have issues crossing the border again, just make sure you bring proof of ties to Canada.

I also don't know for a fact, but I believe there are several factors at play. One of which is lack of comprehensive interagency information sharing. Another is the fact that people may enter on a passport and then leave on a replacement or renewed passport, so even CBP can't match the data based on passport number alone. Of course it's not too hard to match names and birth dates but the system isn't too efficient and going through AoS only furthers my view that the process is fairly inefficient.

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Filed: Country: Canada
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I doubt you will have issues crossing the border again, just make sure you bring proof of ties to Canada.

Thanks for all the information guys, figured I would try to learn more before I try to go back.

LiliBurd, when you mention proof of ties to Canada...what exactly would you/they consider that to be?

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Thanks for all the information guys, figured I would try to learn more before I try to go back.

LiliBurd, when you mention proof of ties to Canada...what exactly would you/they consider that to be?

You need to prove that you will be returning to Canada, for example I bring a letter signed by my employer stating when I am scheduled to come back, copy of recent pay stubs, lease agreement for car or apartment, etc. I was never asked for any of it, but as many say better to be prepared with too much info than be stuck without it.

I also don't know for a fact, but I believe there are several factors at play. One of which is lack of comprehensive interagency information sharing. Another is the fact that people may enter on a passport and then leave on a replacement or renewed passport, so even CBP can't match the data based on passport number alone. Of course it's not too hard to match names and birth dates but the system isn't too efficient and going through AoS only furthers my view that the process is fairly inefficient.

I absolutely agree with yo it is inefficient. :bonk: Difficult to understand what they do and why they do things that way. Only thing we can do is figure out how to navigate through the process.


''No matter how painful distance can be, not having you in my life would be worse''

August 16 2013: Started dating

July 6 2014: Got engaged! (L)

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Filed: Citizen (pnd) Country: Canada
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If you're traveling by air, it's safe to assume that the US knows when you arrived and left. Passenger manifests are tracked.

Traveling by land crossing is different. Up until three years ago, both countries didn't track anyone's departure...only arrivals. Now they have a new US/Canada initiative in place called "Beyond the Border" to reconcile entries and exits, but who gets tracked depends on your status in Canada. If you're a Canadian citizen, then no, the US doesn't track when you leave. If you're a permanent resident or visitor, they do. This initiative was to be extended to citizens earlier this year, but that phase has been put on hold.

http://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/minister-downplays-missed-deadline-in-canada-u-s-border-security-pact/

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Filed: Country: Canada
Timeline

If you're traveling by air, it's safe to assume that the US knows when you arrived and left. Passenger manifests are tracked.

Traveling by land crossing is different. Up until three years ago, both countries didn't track anyone's departure...only arrivals. Now they have a new US/Canada initiative in place called "Beyond the Border" to reconcile entries and exits, but who gets tracked depends on your status in Canada. If you're a Canadian citizen, then no, the US doesn't track when you leave. If you're a permanent resident or visitor, they do. This initiative was to be extended to citizens earlier this year, but that phase has been put on hold.

http://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/minister-downplays-missed-deadline-in-canada-u-s-border-security-pact/

So you're saying if I travel from Canada to US by land, the US will know i've entered but then if I leave the US to enter Canada by land again, the US would not track that?

The I94 website was useful though, it has the dates I arrived and departed which is good to know.

Thanks everyone!

Edited by canaboy

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