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Hiinsharm2011

Affidavit of Support

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I am at the point of submitting the Affidavit of Support. I already paid the $88 fee and submitted the form to assign an agent. Need some help as I am not sure exactly what I should do now.

I am currently living overseas with my husband and have been for the past couple of years, therefore don't work and don't files taxes, nor do I have any assets. So I have asked a family member to be a joint sponsor. This person is unsure whether he should do it or not as we both don't know what it all entails. I have read all of the paperwork that came with the form about the responsibilities as a sponsor, but what does it all really mean and has anyone had any problems with this as a sponsor or the applicant? I read that the contract ends when the applicant becomes a US citizen or gets the 40 credits for social security, sponsor dies, etc. Is it as scary as it sounds? Also this contract means the applicant, as long as the contract with the sponsor is valid, cannot apply for any government benefits such as TANF or SNAP, etc?

I feel so overwhelmed right now. Help!!!

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Yes, your understanding is correct. It is a serious and potentially very long term comittment.

The main reason for the Affadavit of support is to make sure the US government/ tax payers do not pay for a new immigrant, ie that they do not receive means tested benefits. Now, as you will be primary sponsor, they would go after you first but if you cannot pay, then they'd go after the joint sponsor. Keep in mind that it only covers means tested government benefit, not things like personal debt, mortgages etc.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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To clarify, the US would not actually deny the immigrant benefits for which they qualify. It's just that they will seek reimbursement from the sponsor(s), and the immigrant could also sue if they are not being maintained at 125 percent of the poverty level.


I'm a dual US/Hungarian citizen (both by birth; Hungarian citizenship verification TBA), and my husband is a dual British/Irish citizen (by treaty) from Northern Ireland. We are atheists.

All advice is given pursuant to the Disclaimer that you may read at the bottom of each forum page.

LATEST STEPS:

28 Jun 2013: POE Houston

08 Jul 2013: SSN received (at SSA office)

07 Aug 2013: Green Card received

27 Feb 2014: Whoa, life happened. Planning move "back home" together to Republic of Ireland by end of April.

29 Apr 2014: POE Dublin through Heathrow

15 May 2014: Received formal residency/work permission (GNIB card with Stamp 4, one year renewable) for the ROI

For my FULL timeline, see my "About Me" page.


For small creatures such as we, the vastness is bearable only through love. (Carl Sagan)

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Actually Speedwell isn't quite right. The contract is between the US governement and the sponsor. So yes the governement can come after the sponsor if the immigrant collects any benefits that are means tested. Some immigrants have tried to sue the sponsor during divorces saying that means they must be supported at 125% the poverty level, it occasional is held true to the primary sponsor ( spouse) but very very rarely to a secondary sponsor. However 40 quarters is NOT 10 years. IF the immigrant doesn't work or doesn't make the SS minimum for a qualifying quarter that affidavit could last for life.


This will not be over quickly. You will not enjoy this.

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Actually Speedwell isn't quite right. The contract is between the US governement and the sponsor. So yes the governement can come after the sponsor if the immigrant collects any benefits that are means tested. Some immigrants have tried to sue the sponsor during divorces saying that means they must be supported at 125% the poverty level, it occasional is held true to the primary sponsor ( spouse) but very very rarely to a secondary sponsor. However 40 quarters is NOT 10 years. IF the immigrant doesn't work or doesn't make the SS minimum for a qualifying quarter that affidavit could last for life.

I said only what is contained in the actual instructions to the actual form, which you should probably review.


I'm a dual US/Hungarian citizen (both by birth; Hungarian citizenship verification TBA), and my husband is a dual British/Irish citizen (by treaty) from Northern Ireland. We are atheists.

All advice is given pursuant to the Disclaimer that you may read at the bottom of each forum page.

LATEST STEPS:

28 Jun 2013: POE Houston

08 Jul 2013: SSN received (at SSA office)

07 Aug 2013: Green Card received

27 Feb 2014: Whoa, life happened. Planning move "back home" together to Republic of Ireland by end of April.

29 Apr 2014: POE Dublin through Heathrow

15 May 2014: Received formal residency/work permission (GNIB card with Stamp 4, one year renewable) for the ROI

For my FULL timeline, see my "About Me" page.


For small creatures such as we, the vastness is bearable only through love. (Carl Sagan)

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I said only what is contained in the actual instructions to the actual form, which you should probably review.

I just read the actual intructions and no where does it say the immigrant can sue the sponsor , It does say government agencies can sue for benefits recieved . Maybe you are the one that needs to read the instructions.


This will not be over quickly. You will not enjoy this.

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I just read the actual intructions and no where does it say the immigrant can sue the sponsor , It does say government agencies can sue for benefits recieved . Maybe you are the one that needs to read the instructions.

My mistake. It's written on the form itself:

What If I Do Not Fulfill My Obligations?

If you do not provide sufficient support to the person who becomes a permanent resident based on the Form I-864 that you signed, that person may sue you for this support.


I'm a dual US/Hungarian citizen (both by birth; Hungarian citizenship verification TBA), and my husband is a dual British/Irish citizen (by treaty) from Northern Ireland. We are atheists.

All advice is given pursuant to the Disclaimer that you may read at the bottom of each forum page.

LATEST STEPS:

28 Jun 2013: POE Houston

08 Jul 2013: SSN received (at SSA office)

07 Aug 2013: Green Card received

27 Feb 2014: Whoa, life happened. Planning move "back home" together to Republic of Ireland by end of April.

29 Apr 2014: POE Dublin through Heathrow

15 May 2014: Received formal residency/work permission (GNIB card with Stamp 4, one year renewable) for the ROI

For my FULL timeline, see my "About Me" page.


For small creatures such as we, the vastness is bearable only through love. (Carl Sagan)

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Thank you for the replies. It's not likely that the applicant will sue the sponsor, but anyone had experience where the applicant did receive means tested benefits and the government sought reimbursement?

Can anyone give me an idea how long it took them to become a US Citizen after receiving approval for the spousal visa?

Just trying to cover all areas of concern for our potential sponsor.

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I have heard of stories on here, but it is rare.

Once the beneficiary gets the greencard, assuming they stay married to the US citizen, they can apply for naturalisation 3 years later.


Bye: Penguin

Me: Irish/ Swiss citizen, and now naturalised US citizen. Husband: USC; twin babies born Feb 08 in Ireland and a daughter in Feb 2010 in Arkansas who are all joint Irish/ USC. Did DCF (IR1) in 6 weeks via the Dublin, Ireland embassy and now living in Arkansas.

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