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jack999

Joining US citizenship?

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Hello, I am a GC holder right now and eligible to apply for the citizenship soon. Could someone tell me what the differences are (obligations and benefits) between GC and citizenship? Thanks!

Citizenship affords you the right to vote. Other than that the obligations and benefits are the same for everyone across the board.


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Some jobs require US citizenship (federal contracting or employment), so this is something you might want to keep in mind as well. I am sure there are additional differences between one holding a greencard and one who is an actual US citizen in terms of rights but do not know for certain.

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Us citizen - absolute right to live and work in US.

LPR - US permission to live and work here. Status can be lost or taken away. Certain crimes will lead to deportation.

Probably the most important part of getting US citizenship is the absolute right to live and work in the US.

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A Green Card holder is a foreigner living in the U.S. with permission of the U.S. government. This permission can be revoked or withdrawn for numerous reasons, one of them being to long outside the United States. A Green Card holder needs to renew his Green Card frequently, at a price.

A citizen is a person living in his country. He has the right to come and go as he pleases and this right cannot be taken away, even if he is convicted of a serious crime. He has the right to vote and all other rights reserved to citizens only.

For people who can retain their old citizenship, becoming a US citizen is a no-brainer. Only people who would lose their original citizenship have to make a decision that is more involved.

Edited by Brother Hesekiel

There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all . . . . The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin, of preventing all possibility of its continuing to be a nation at all, would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities, an intricate knot of German-Americans, Irish-Americans, English-Americans, French-Americans, Scandinavian-Americans or Italian-Americans, each preserving its separate nationality, each at heart feeling more sympathy with Europeans of that nationality, than with the other citizens of the American Republic . . . . There is no such thing as a hyphenated American who is a good American. The only man who is a good American is the man who is an American and nothing else.

President Teddy Roosevelt on Columbus Day 1915

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Getting a US passport is one advantage, particularly if you from Venezuela where you can't travel anywhere with that passport without getting a visa from each country you want to travel to.

Stepdaughter finally got off her butt to apply citizenship when she received the opportunity to study in the UK, not only that, but visited countries all over Europe and Scandinavia countries as well. But probably not a great advantage if you already have a Canadian passport.. Ha, now I wonder if you need to maintain your Canadian passport to visit there since your US passport will say born in Canada. Liked it better a couple of years ago before all this nonsense started. We had many divisions in Canada, was like driving across town. Now it's a nightmare coming back to the USA.

Find it ironic our founders never purchased land from the British, probably because of the Revolutionary War, and that War of 1812. Sure purchased a bunch of land from Spain and France. More than likely, could have purchased all of Canada for 50 bucks. Should have least purchased Quebec from the French, they still don't like English up there. Plus you have huge oil reserves.

Wife couldn't wait to get her US citizenship, with a green card, always treated like an outsider, small town prejudices. Guess it depends on your circumstances. Still trying to find old high school buddies that ran up to Canada to avoid VN. Know some of them got married to Canadians, can't even do that anymore the way things are today without a bunch of money and paperwork. Have friends living here that married Canadians, having a nightmare now with immigration. All because of an invisible line, too bad we can't be one country.

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