Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
spectheintro

Adding maiden name as middle name?

7 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Iran
Timeline

Hey all:

Anyone here have any issues adding their maiden name as their middle name during naturalization? When my wife immigrated, her married name appeared on all of her documentation, including her greencard, but I always referenced her maiden name as another name she's gone by. Would it qualify as a name change to add her maiden name to the name on her naturalization certificate? Is it a hassle? On the one hand, I would like it to be on her official documentation so it appears on her US Passport (it will make traveling to her home country easier) but on the other hand I am so loathe to add any more complication to the mix.

Would appreciate any insight/advice that anyone has. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So basically, you are saying that her legal name at the moment is her first name + married name, but you guys want to add her maiden name as her middle name? I am pretty sure that this would be considered a name change, because she never had a middle name (correct me if I am wrong) and now she is adding one. Another possibility is to add the maiden name to her married name and have two words as her last name, but in your case, that would also be a name change. Name change can prolong the process a bit.

Edited by LA80

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
Timeline

You can do this during the Naturalization process, yes. There shouldn't be any problems. Naturalization gives you the opportunity to have your Naturalization certificate issued in whatever name you wish. The process involves filing the petition in the name you wish to have on the certificate. A judge will legally 'change' the name to the one you want prior to the Naturalization Oath and the Certificate will then be issued in that name. It is the easiest way to change a name as there is no additional fee to do it with this process (there is if you are doing it on your own), and at most it only adds a few weeks to the process- whatever time it takes to get the separate action of the name change approved by a judge - so would just make the Oath ceremony scheduled at a bit later date. It may not even be a few weeks but it is generally not longer.


“...Isn't it splendid to think of all the things there are to find out about? It just makes me feel glad to be alive--it's such an interesting world. It wouldn't be half so interesting if we knew all about everything, would it? There'd be no scope for imagination then, would there?”

. Lucy Maude Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables

5892822976_477b1a77f7_z.jpg

Another Member of the VJ Fluffy Kitty Posse!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Iran
Timeline

So basically, you are saying that her legal name at the moment is her first name + married name, but you guys want to add her maiden name as her middle name? I am pretty sure that this would be considered a name change, because she never had a middle name (correct me if I am wrong) and now she is adding one. Another possibility is to add the maiden name to her married name and have two words as her last name, but in your case, that would also be a name change. Name change can prolong the process a bit.

That is correct. I wouldn't want to change her last name to a hyphenated version, since her entire credit history is based on being Jane Doe (for example), and I don't want to muddy it by changing it to Jane Smith-Doe. But it looks like I need to ask for a name change.

You can do this during the Naturalization process, yes. There shouldn't be any problems. Naturalization gives you the opportunity to have your Naturalization certificate issued in whatever name you wish. The process involves filing the petition in the name you wish to have on the certificate. A judge will legally 'change' the name to the one you want prior to the Naturalization Oath and the Certificate will then be issued in that name. It is the easiest way to change a name as there is no additional fee to do it with this process (there is if you are doing it on your own), and at most it only adds a few weeks to the process- whatever time it takes to get the separate action of the name change approved by a judge - so would just make the Oath ceremony scheduled at a bit later date. It may not even be a few weeks but it is generally not longer.

I was a little worried it would extend the timeline, but if it's only a few weeks that may be all right. I would hope that this is the most benign form of name change from a credit history/identity standpoint, given that everything else (SSN, DOB, First and Last Name) are remaining identical. Am I right to assume that?

Thank you both for your input!

Edited by spectheintro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is benign in the sense that the name is going to be recognizable, probably with only one additional initial (Jane Maidenname Doe = Jane M. Doe), but she will have to contact the SSA and notify them about the name change eventually. As far as I know, SSN always remains the same.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Filed: IR-1/CR-1 Visa Country: Iran
Timeline

It is benign in the sense that the name is going to be recognizable, probably with only one additional initial (Jane Maidenname Doe = Jane M. Doe), but she will have to contact the SSA and notify them about the name change eventually. As far as I know, SSN always remains the same.

Yeah, I'll just handle it all in one fell swoop--citizenship prompts the same notification requirement, so it'll be a good chance to get everything properly set up.

I cannot wait for this to all be over; it's going to be legen--wait for it--no more immigration ever-dary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Colombia
Timeline

I really didn't push this issue with my wife, more like having two last names, like Smith-Jones that is traditional in her home country, but not in the USA. with two last names, especially longer ones, no room for things like credit cards. Also confusion in the phone books when they go by that maiden name as the beginning of the last name. No where near where her married name is at.

When it came to US citizenship, and living here for three years, she dropped her maiden name on her N-400 application without any problems nor delays. SS did the same thing, but SS used two lines for the last name where credit cards won't do that.

If your wife is happy with her married name, would not add her maiden name to it, just creates a lot of confusion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Didn't find the answer you were looking for? Ask our VJ Immigration Lawyers.

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
- Back to Top -


Important Disclaimer: Please read carefully the Visajourney.com Terms of Service. If you do not agree to the Terms of Service you should not access or view any page (including this page) on VisaJourney.com. Answers and comments provided on Visajourney.com Forums are general information, and are not intended to substitute for informed professional medical, psychiatric, psychological, tax, legal, investment, accounting, or other professional advice. Visajourney.com does not endorse, and expressly disclaims liability for any product, manufacturer, distributor, service or service provider mentioned or any opinion expressed in answers or comments. VisaJourney.com does not condone immigration fraud in any way, shape or manner. VisaJourney.com recommends that if any member or user knows directly of someone involved in fraudulent or illegal activity, that they report such activity directly to the Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Customs Enforcement. You can contact ICE via email at Immigration.Reply@dhs.gov or you can telephone ICE at 1-866-347-2423. All reported threads/posts containing reference to immigration fraud or illegal activities will be removed from this board. If you feel that you have found inappropriate content, please let us know by contacting us here with a url link to that content. Thank you.
×
×
  • Create New...