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SweetheartSarah

Going to school in the US [Colorado] after landing...

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Filed: K-1 Visa Country: Canada
Timeline

How long after landing am I eligible to go to school [college]?

I am looking to attend community college for the first year at least, then we'll see. But I realize that tuition depends on whether you're a permanent resident or an international applicant, but what if I'm there, not yet a permanent resident, on a K-1 visa and married but awaiting my green card?

I don't know how any of this works... Ahhh!

Am I still allowed to study or do I have to wait to be a permanent resident and or/state resident to be able to benefit?

Any input on the matter would be appreciated!

Thanks!

:)

Edited by SweetheartSarah

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  • Sent and marked "received": February 13, 2018
  • Biometrics Scheduled: February 17, 2018
  • Biometrics Completed: March 5, 2018
  • Interview Completed: September 11, 2018
  • Naturalization Ceremony: January 17, 2019

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Filed: Citizen (pnd) Country: Mexico
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You can go to school whenever you want, it just depends on how much you are willing to pay for it.

In CO you need your Green card to be able to go to school, unless you wanna pay like an International student but their fees are outrageous (about 3-4x more). After getting your GC, you need to have lived in Colorado for at least 1 year to be able to qualify for in-state tuition, which is the cheapest you can get; if you don't qualify for it you have to pay out-of state and it's about 2x more.


K1 visa
Filed I-129: Dec 3rd 2010
Interview: July 6th 2011 APPROVED!


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Filed: Oct 4th 2011
AOS Interview: Feb 7th 2012 - RFE sad.png
AOS Approved: Feb 9th - without sending RFE
Green Card received: Feb 17th smile.png

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Filed: Nov 13th 2013

Approved: March 13th 2014

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Filed: K-3 Visa Country: Thailand
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You can go to school whenever you want, it just depends on how much you are willing to pay for it.

In CO you need your Green card to be able to go to school, unless you wanna pay like an International student but their fees are outrageous (about 3-4x more). After getting your GC, you need to have lived in Colorado for at least 1 year to be able to qualify for in-state tuition, which is the cheapest you can get; if you don't qualify for it you have to pay out-of state and it's about 2x more.

While I agree with most of this I would add that the cheapest way is to qualify for a Pell Grant. That is what I did to lower the cost. Slect the school, then go to see them about the different aid programs they have.

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How long after landing am I eligible to go to school [college]?

I am looking to attend community college for the first year at least, then we'll see. But I realize that tuition depends on whether you're a permanent resident or an international applicant, but what if I'm there, not yet a permanent resident, on a K-1 visa and married but awaiting my green card?

I don't know how any of this works... Ahhh!

Am I still allowed to study or do I have to wait to be a permanent resident and or/state resident to be able to benefit?

Any input on the matter would be appreciated!

Thanks!

:)

Are you talking CSU or CU?? Makes a difference actually. To begin with, check residency requirements. Keep in mind it's not in stone, I know this first hand.

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Filed: Citizen (apr) Country: Canada
Timeline

This sort of thing varies radically from state to state, and from school to school within a given state. The best place to get authoritative answers will be the admissions office of the school in question. They will have one or more employees who know all the ins-and-outs of how different immigration statuses affect their rates and eligibility.


DON'T PANIC

"It says wonderful things about the two countries [Canada and the US] that neither one feels itself being inundated by each other's immigrants."

-Douglas Coupland

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